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Old 07-09-2009, 04:06 AM   #41
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Re: Scotts first bus

Hello all!

Felt it was time to get back online. Sitting on my butt recovering from kidney removal surgery.
They assure me they got all the cancer, but I will be out of action for quite some time. Not allowed to lift anything heaver than my big butt!

Good news is that I can still cruz this forum and steal some more of the great ideas found within.

Scott
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Old 07-09-2009, 01:10 PM   #42
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Re: Scotts first bus

My family has added you to our prayer list for a full and speedy recovery, glad you can cruise the forum again!
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:52 PM   #43
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Re: Scotts first bus

Here's hoping you have a speedy recovery! Congrats on a successful surgery too!!!
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Old 07-16-2009, 12:43 PM   #44
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Re: Scotts first bus

I thank you all.
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Old 08-17-2009, 02:02 PM   #45
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Re: Scotts first bus

Quote:
Originally Posted by newbusser
cool!

I am understanding everything except the inverter issue. should I run two separate sets of 110 wires? one from shore power and one from inverter and keep them away from each other?

If I understand everything else, I am going to run all 12 volt wires down one side of overhead chase, all audio type wires down the other side overhead, 110 wires coming from shore power under windows on one side and 110 wires from inverter down other side under windows..? or can I use the same wires for 110 and just use transfer switch?

I just went through the great "stranded vs solid" debate in the how to wire up the bus tutorial and here's where I stand on the issue: I don't know the technical part of the issue, but I have a few stranded wire extension cords that have been put through the ringer a few times and never failed, so I think I will go to home depot and spend a couple hundred bucks getting a good supply of 50' and 75' extension cords. I will get a few real heavy duty and get two different colors so I can separate the 12v from the 110 shore power and the inverter.

I am also thinking of getting two or three transfer switches (expensive, but i think vital.) to run one set of 110 wires and just be able to switch from shore to inverter power.

once I get all this figured out i get to start to work out the audio and video wiring mess

thanks

well i paid $130 for a 100' 10 gage extension cord in june.
i think home depot or some thing like it might have it
cheeper by the foot for just the wire with no ends!

camo-monster
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Old 08-19-2009, 08:34 PM   #46
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Re: Scotts first bus

Thats a nice bus . I hope you get as much enjoyment out of it as we have our little Thomas shorty .

The best thing is the saftey ,imo . The way people drive , you need all the protection you can get .

Also we no longer get blowed all over the road when trucks pass like we did in our motorhome or pulling camper . Good Luck and happy camping.
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Old 08-19-2009, 08:48 PM   #47
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Re: Scotts first bus

Yes,
Safety was the main thing that attracted me to a schoolie as opposed to finding a good used motor home and going from there. It seems like a lot more work to convert a bus into a rolling home, but then that is a huge part of the fun for me.

I used to drive long haul, and have seen two motor home accidents, one right in front of me, and the mess was scary. Aluminum and little 2x2 sticks of wood everywhere. The thought of my family inside one of those if i get it on it's side is unacceptable. The safety of the steel bodied schoolie is just too much to pass up.

And they just look cool anywhere you go
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Old 08-20-2009, 12:13 AM   #48
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Once again, looking for information



I need to, once again, tap into that vast amount of knowledge that is housed here on Skoolie.net. (Feeling very eloquent tonight

The Wiring diagram above is one I Borrowed (stole) from someone else, and if I knew who, I would give a very big "thank you" to for allowing it to go out.

The level of my knowledge in wiring is speakers and stereos in 4 wheelers, and some automotive electrical classes a long time ago. So... I have a few questions:

1. Is there a book or place online where I can get basic information about the functions and necessities of some of the items shown in the diagram, and gauge sizing requirements or recommendations for these items?

2. Is the "Charge Wizard" just a monitoring device to display the level of battery charge?

3. What is meant by "Battery Brain"?

4. I am seeing an Alternator inline between the Inverter and a battery brain. do you think this is an extra? or is this meant to represent the main vehicle alternator?

5. Is the purpose of an inverter to change 12v battery power into 110 volt?

6. Would it be wise to place an additional transfer switch between the shore power and the Gen sets to keep from back feeding the gen when hooked up to shore?

7. When Battery banks are hooked up, are they hooked positive to negative, or positive to positive? I want to maintain 12volts with increased amps but cannot remember how to do it.

Thank you all for the information that i know will be flooding in. And thanks again to the artist that came up with this diagram, it helps me a lot.
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File Type: jpg Adams-Wiring-Diagram.jpg (34.6 KB, 317 views)
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Old 08-21-2009, 12:11 AM   #49
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Re: Scotts first bus

Once again, amazing.

I just printed out enough stuff to keep me busy reading and learning for a week!

Thank you!
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Old 08-28-2009, 03:14 PM   #50
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Re: Scotts first bus

I finally healed up enough to work on the floor some more, so here is the update.

Whoever puts these sheets of ply down at the factory must get paid by the number of nails he shoots thru the floor and the pounds of goopy glue he uses on the edges!

This is the result of six hours working off and on. I would just leave it down, but there are some nasty rust spots that means it all has to come out.

There is a method to the madness however! These two pics show the best way I have found to remove the plywood from floor.


The skill saw is set to just barely go thru the ply without hitting the metal (much), and the scraper is a home made thing that helps pry it up.
This is a couple of pieces of plate steel welded on to the end of a piece of 2" water pipe with a bend in it. A trailer hitch ball welded into the end makes it easier to hold and slide. Heavy, but effective.

More to come, I am back in the saddle.

Scott
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File Type: jpg IMG_2292.JPG (87.1 KB, 406 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_2293.JPG (104.7 KB, 406 views)
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Old 08-31-2009, 10:23 PM   #51
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Re: Scotts first bus

Scott,

I just registered on this site tonight, but have been on here several times over the last year. I've owned a tailgater for about 1-1/2 years and still enjoy toying with it. I have a 91 ford Carpenter 44 pass. I have 3 partners in it, but soon to own it myself because we're the only ones to use it. Stay positive with the work ahead of you on the bus, and it will be a labor of love.

Mark
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Old 09-04-2009, 01:25 PM   #52
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Re: Scotts first bus

well it nice to hear from a professional bus driver and watch them work im sure your general bus knowledge is just heads over most others
so you have the practical now time for theoretical {new college class bus theory}
hope your pee making system is better.....
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Old 09-04-2009, 02:09 PM   #53
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Re: Scotts first bus

Oh! If it were only so...
The extent of my knowledge is driving them, have learned a lot here and still have a long way to go.

This is the latest version of the plumbing I want to create for the ends of the black and grey water tanks.

I need to find a better drawing medium...

If I got the correct formula, 231 c.i. = 1 Gallon, then they should hold close to 105 gallons each. I just have to go weigh a gallon of water to see what the approx weight will be and then probably reinforce the stuffing out of my cargo holds, since this is where they will go.
I also have to come up with a floor plan I like to allow the terlet to be located amidships, since the plumbing to the black water tank has to run between the frame rails to avoid the fuel tanks mounted outboard.

Any ideas?
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Old 09-09-2009, 03:01 PM   #54
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Re: Scotts first bus

WOW! Thanks Smitty!

Anyone happen to know the rated weight capacity of the cargo bays under a 1984 Blue Bird All American 40 footer?
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Old 09-21-2009, 12:05 AM   #55
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Re: Scotts first bus

Can't find anyone that knows weight limits on my cargo bays, so will err on the safe side and reinforce them. My local PUD gives away the empty wire spools and they have REAL long bolts holding them together. I am going to drill down thru the floor, thru the bay top, and into the bay bottom. this will let me hang the tanks on a frame made from angle iron and not sit them on the cargo bay floor. At least, that is the plan.

Will follow up with pics when it happens, or when it fails, either way.
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Old 09-25-2009, 02:34 PM   #56
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Re: Scotts first bus

OK, finally got the rest of floor out, almost. I still have by front steps and under drives seat area.

I got a flash idea the other day (scary thought) and wondered if anyone had ever used truck bed liner on the floor before putting down insulation?

the idea being it is thicker than rust-o-leam and would give some measure of sealing. just roll it out with a regular short nap roller instead of the textureing one that comes with kit.

Any ideas?
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Old 09-25-2009, 07:29 PM   #57
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Re: Scotts first bus

Might also look into Rhyno-lining... Spray in, never have to worry about it again. And, they can spray it thin or thick.

Down side, its a little expensive. But as an idea, its worth looking into. I have thoughts off spraying the outside of a bus instead of painting it. Never have to worry about scratches or repainting, and it is claimed that it even works as a minor insulation.
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Old 09-25-2009, 09:45 PM   #58
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Re: Scotts first bus

Dont use bedliner, it isnt that durable and make it hard to get your subfloor level. After sandblasting, I used a good epoxy primer and a cheap 2 part urethane paint. It is tough as nails. In hindsight, I would have not used any rustoleum (or any air dry paint) on the bus. My ceiling is rustoleum and took awhile to harden and still scratches relatively easy where as the cheap 2 part urethane took quite a beating before it scratched. Not to mention, the rustoleum doesnt hold a shine very well.
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Old 09-26-2009, 01:27 PM   #59
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Re: Scotts first bus

I had a buddy rhino line the outside of his jeep. It was perfect for rockcrawling the desert in New Mexico. No scratches. It has a little bit of texture to it, but actually looked pretty cool. Only problem would be if you ever wanted to change the color I would think. If you wanted a really really tough finish on the outside and were ok keeping the same color forever....it works really well. They can even make it have a semi gloss to it. Its not gonna be shiny and clear coat looking, but it is a different way of doing it, and it looked pretty good. Would be a giant pain to take off though I think if you wanted to do a different color.
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Old 09-26-2009, 06:55 PM   #60
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Re: Scotts first bus

Yeah, its a permanent solution... But then again, As far as I know, so are the standard "Stick and Staple"s. Once sprayed on, its there till you scrape it off as it kinda binds onto the metal. I could be wrong, but I believe that on most "S&S", the graphics are part of the panel instead of a decal...

But on the upside, You can rinse the dirt and bugs off of it with no problems, it supposedly works as a minor form of insulation (external, at least a couple degree drop, nothing major), and it would seal up most of the body pretty well. And the best part, it comes in a bunch of colors. So you can have them spray several colors for your graphics...Replicate the graphics from a "S&S" on your skoolie for urban camo. ^.^

I like the idea cause it would mean never having to re-apply paint to the bus, ever. Quick cleaning, just hose it off. Durable, no scratches, minor dent resistance, UV protected. They even have a color rejuvenater that they can apply, or you can just buy it from them to do it yourself.
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