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Old 03-27-2016, 12:17 AM   #1
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seats out

Finally got the seats out, man all that iron looks tempting, anybody out there ever used that metal, if so suggestions would be appreciated. So the seats are out what next, floor or walls what's the best way to proceed the walls have these connectors that are rounded with no Phillips holes looks like rivets but no center indent how do I handle these. Please advise
By the way thanks for advice so far really help with seats, I have to tackle a quick paint job before they will let me tag any ideas on this.
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Old 03-27-2016, 09:21 AM   #2
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I would pull all the windows out. Then use a grinder and get the walls and ceiling off. Tear up the floor then put the windows back in.

If I were to do it over that is how I would approach it.
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Old 03-27-2016, 09:28 AM   #3
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I saved the windows for last so that my bus and tools don't get exposed to the weather.
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Old 03-27-2016, 10:35 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
I saved the windows for last so that my bus and tools don't get exposed to the weather.
Ya, If you had like 2-3days in a row you could work straight just grind it out. (pardon the pun lol )

Only reason I would pop the windows out would be for when you are grinding you wouldn't have to worry about the sparks. But I totally agree with EastCoastCB on needing the windows to protect from the elements.
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Old 03-27-2016, 10:48 AM   #5
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The wind gets so bad here sometimes, I have free access to plastic sheets from my landlord's greenhouse I'm going to use temporarily when the windows do come out. It won't hold long, so I'm hoping for the best.
Last year the wind literally ripped off my emergency exit hatches and blew them to pieces. Patched with pieces of what used to be the ceilings, for now. Gotta rivet on some 16 or 18 gauge patches.
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Old 03-27-2016, 11:07 AM   #6
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Oh wow! That's crazy!!

Free plastic sheets is a score though.

Ya I think I only ended up having mine out overnight. Wish I would have done all of the needed grinding when they were out though.
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Old 03-28-2016, 12:47 PM   #7
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Exclamation Please advise!!

I am curious, how many replace the bus windows? I would like to keep them, but I have some that do not want to stay closed (although I think removal, cleaning and resetting will fix) but I am curious as to that lack of insulation? and or sweating.
Any opinions? I could use some good advice, because replacement/covering going to be a costly/more detailed redo that I am not sure I am qualified for.
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Old 03-28-2016, 01:03 PM   #8
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Lots of folks choose to keep the original bus windows but it is necessary to do a lot of serious sealing if you plan on living with them. They leak. They ALL leak. A LOT. Many replace them for that reason alone. It's one thing to have water dribbling all over a rubber floor. It is an all together different tune when you have built out lots of wooden cabinets, bunks, storage and such into the same space.
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Old 03-28-2016, 01:04 PM   #9
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Lots of people remove the windows. Lots of people don't.

Personally I like the windows as does my wife hence why we got a school bus.

Like you said after taking them out and cleaning them they might work. Or you could always seal them shut permanently. Also Jake Von Slatt has a video on dissembling the windows and reversing them. Might be able to clean them better that way as well.

As far as insulation/sweating goes I would insulate the bus as best you can in every other spot. Then get a good black out curtain to cover the windows. That is my plan and I think it will work out quite well.

I mean the windows are single pane bus windows they will never be fantastic. My goal is to over compensate in other ways to hopefully counteract them. hope this helps.
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Old 03-28-2016, 01:55 PM   #10
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Those windows seem to radiate cold during the winter, and yes they really sweat if you're using propane. You've probably noticed certain areas where the metal sweats worse than the windows.
Many of us like the windows and the visibility to the outside that it gives us. However you've got to put a lot of heat in there to feel warm during the coldest winter months, depending on where you live.
Several people on this site advised me to get foam insulation board from a home supply store and cut pieces to fit the windows. Sounds reasonable, and even 1/2" insulation over some of the windows would certainly make a difference. Beyond that a wood stove or pellet stove would drastically help you avoid the sweating problem. The bus, not you. Have you noticed that the floors will sweat also? Carpet seems to avoid about 90% of floor sweating.
It's a process and we all seem to have slightly different goals. Good luck.
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