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Old 07-15-2015, 02:25 AM   #41
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Join Date: Aug 2011
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Originally Posted by allwthrrider View Post
Are you saying it was a bad idea??
No, I think its a great idea.

Im going air cleaner on the passenger side, and stack on the drivers side on my 8.3 Cummins rear engine. Strait in, and strait out.

If I could find a spare hood for my 86 Trans am, I would mount a bus air cleaner element on top of the carb, sticking 2 feet through the hood.

I like big air cleaners.

Nat
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Old 07-15-2015, 08:15 AM   #42
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Location: Houston, Texas
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Year: 1946
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I'm with you on the "big air cleaner" plan Nat --- I have been looking all over for a stainless steel housing I can mount on the outside of the cab like the 18 wheelers do. Can't go nearly as big as they do but want something a whole lot larger and better flowing than the typical Dodge Ram under-the-hood set ups. Will probably have to fabricate my own can/container around the largest filter that I can put in that area.

Just what I need...one more "one-off" project to build. But diesels can live or die by how well they breathe. Likewise on the exhaust side.
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Old 07-15-2015, 10:55 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
Sure you can, right through the roof.

Nat
Like Nat said.
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Old 07-17-2015, 03:36 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allwthrrider View Post
Like Nat said.
Working at the bus shop, I wish we were allowed to do that while the bus is still on route moving kids on dirt roads. It would save so many repairs caused by dust and dirt.

But the department of transportation says the the buses moving kids must stay stock. We're not even allowed to turn the engines up.

Nat
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Old 09-15-2015, 01:41 PM   #45
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Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 196
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freightliner HDX
Engine: CAT 3126B250
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I can hardly believe it's been 2 months since I posted something, and it really feels like I haven't done much. I've worked more than a few 60+ hour weeks, but when I get to the shop, I just want to sleep. I have made some progress including:

I removed the rear window and had a piece fabricated to cover it. The cover will remain off with the fan in place until the floor is completely rust and hole free, so a few years. HA! I use the fan to vent out the dust and fumes from working on the inside. Weight savings: about 40 pounds.



I finished installing all of the metal panels over all windows except the driver's window, the windshield (of course), the side door window, and the 2 mini windows at the rear. All panels overlap and are fastened to the ribs with 16 screws per rib, perhaps a few more or less at the ends. Total weight savings: 52 pounds (2 pounds per window)


Of course, when drilling the pilot holes through existing holes on the ribs from the inside, there are a few places that didn't line up as I had hoped. I'm not satisfied with the result from an appearance aspect, but then I remind myself that I'm sure any buses in Mad Max land aren't perfectly constructed either. I'm not worried about the panels becoming loose, or leaking, so that's the main point.


.
While exploring the ribs and body panels from the inside, I noticed that the side panels are only rivetted every 4th rib. This bothered me since I don't want to hear the panels rattling as I go down the road, and I don't want flexing to dislodge the spray insulation when applied, so I took the liberty of fastening the body to those other ribs using existing holes in the ribs in 10 places per rib. If you're keeping count, that's 780 or so screws pilotted, drilled and screwed for the windows and sides so far.


The end result will look pretty heavy duty, and I may continue the screws all the way down the rib to the bottom, not sure just yet. The white haze is Ospho treatment on the screws, existing rivets and panels.

As for the interior, at each location where a rivet or screw penetrated the body, whether installed by me or the manufacturer, I applied Ospho, at least 1 coat of rust reforming primer, and 3 coats of Plastidip to prevent corrosion and water intrusion.

Also, when the butyl caulk dries at the top and bottom, more Plastidip will be applied as a last effort in case any water wants to make it through. I am also in the process of caulking the exterior. At the top of the panels where they duck under the rain gutter, it's taking about 1 tube of caulk for every 3 windows. I bought out the local store and am waiting for restock.



I have also ordered my fridge and it will sit in the shop, a much welcomed addition to my living arrangement. I will also get to MadMaxify the fridge before installation. I selected a Whirlpool WRT134TFDW after literally a month of research. The price ($500), the energy usage (336kWh/yr) and the dimensions all played a part. I really wanted a stainless steel look, but since I'm going to decorate it anyway, why waste the money.

Additionally, I designed and ordered some custom made 18ga louvered panels that might be nothing more than for show on the exterior, but may serve as vent covers, light diffusers or anything else I can think of.

I've been looking seriously at getting a set of these wheel covers as well, again, for looks, since I doubt I'll realize any mileage efficiency improvement on my bus.


I'm going to wait to do the insulation until I know I won't need any wiring, venting or other holes that pass through the roof or sides. That way, I can block them all off, and in the future, if something goes wrong, I won't have to dig out the insulation.

My next big design elements are going to be the under-bus supports for water, propane, battery, grey water and storage areas, as well as the roof rack. I was thining about drilling through the rib flanges at the roof and running about 8-12 bolts through to a steel plate on the outside as a foot, but closer to the edges than the middle. Any suggestions? Advice? It won't be a full length rack since the solar panels will be up there, 6 of them, and I'd like it strong enough so that, if I decide to later, I can put some planks up there to serve as a deck if I'm not hauling anything.
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Old 09-15-2015, 07:43 PM   #46
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Join Date: Aug 2011
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Thanks for swinging in to give us a update.

I hear you on the work getting in the way. Story of my life. Years go by sometimes between changes.

I think I posted this before, but will say again how much I like the way you bent the profile at the bottoms of the new sheets. It turned out great.

You also got the sheets nice and flat, with nice even rivet installation.

Nat
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Old 09-16-2015, 08:26 AM   #47
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Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 7
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Vista 3600
Engine: Navistar DT-466
I'm going to be following your thread with rapt attention as I have similar design hopes and ideas for my own build. (doesn't hurt mine is also a Thomas, albeit a shorty Vista model)

I'm also aiming to do a half roof rack with solar so i'm very keen on seeing how you do that with yours. I'm planning on doing the rack in fairly heavy gauge aluminum square tube with built in storage boxes and wide spaced wood plank decking.

I do have some welding experience and training from classes at the local community college, so feel free to bounce ideas off me. (and know a few who are actually employed for their welding and fabricating skills, unlike myself)

Good luck and keep us updated!
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Old 09-16-2015, 10:41 AM   #48
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Join Date: May 2015
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 385
Year: 92
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Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DTA360 5.9L
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Just want to say great work on your bus, looks like its coming together. I hear you on the 60+ hours a week and then just wanting to sleep when you go work on it. Mines 45 minutes from where I live so many times I get in the car and just like "**** I am exhausted, would I even get much done if I go work ono it?"
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Old 09-16-2015, 11:15 AM   #49
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For a mad max type exhaust, use the rear stack that is used in cold climate areas. Nothing major, just a stack that has expanded sheet metal around it for a heat gaurd.
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Old 09-28-2015, 08:02 PM   #50
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Location: Arkansas (For Now)
Posts: 26
Year: 2001
Chassis: Thomas
Engine: 3126b CAT
RHOMBUS, did you ever figure out what was causing your electrical issues? The gauges on my Thomas HDX we're dropping whilst driving down the road. Sometimes they would work, but often they would stop working and not work again until I restarted the bus. I made it within 300 miles of home and the bus died on me and has not started back since. I was thinking bad ground somewhere, but I can't be sure. Just wondering if you figured yours out or have any ideas for what it could be? Love the progress you have made on yours so far and it gives me hope for mine!
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