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Old 03-03-2010, 11:49 AM   #11
Skoolie
 
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Re: Sinclair

I just read up about radiant barriers and it doesn't say anything about blocking the cold. I would like to use it on the floor of the bus because it would allow for a couple of inches more headroom. Did you find anything about this when you were looking at what ever site you used?

Thanks,

Jackie
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Old 03-03-2010, 04:38 PM   #12
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Re: Sinclair

Yes funny man I do have the right post. The question was posed with the long text
When you coming to Utah and work on a bus for me????
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Old 03-03-2010, 04:40 PM   #13
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Re: Sinclair

Hey Smitty how are you getting more wall space if you will be filling it with insulation?

Aww shucks, you don't have to say how I'm the brightest crayon in the box
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Old 03-04-2010, 12:50 AM   #14
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Re: Sinclair

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seeria
Can anyone give me the pros and cons to this idea, please?

On the siding, rather than removing the metal and replacing the inside insulation, how about leaving it be and putting insulation board over the length of the bus wall (not windows) then covering with a walling material (not even sure what that is called).

I understand that the inside might be rusty, the insulation inadequate. My problem is time. Once the bus is here I have maybe 4 weeks to get her in good enough shape to hit the road so time (and to some extent money) is my biggest obstacle.
Smitty you must be going senile in your old age, so thought I would bring the post up for you
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Old 03-04-2010, 01:25 AM   #15
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Re: Sinclair

Minus... The factory installed insulation isnt very good. You could remove the panels and put in much better insulation into the factory wall cavity, then do what you intend.
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Old 03-04-2010, 09:50 AM   #16
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Re: Sinclair

Okay on Radiant Barriers
Deal with them is not to give R value, they are not insulation, they are a barrier. To work, they require air space, so sandwiching them btwn things is a waste of money.

Gent from radiantbarrier.com says this about my above questions:
In your current configuration, you would apply our Super-R Plus Perforated foil as described below. Hopefully, the foil will have a bit of air space on one side or the other. The performance will be lessened if it is sandwiched tightly against both surfaces.
∑ Here is the extreme answer. Remove ALL the useless fiberglass. Attach our Tempshield Double Bubble Double Foil Insulation to the furring strips leaving a space between the insulation and the metal skin. This will provide a 97% heat barrier and eliminate any condensation.


Guy from an ebay store selling barriers says:
That is a good question, and probably one that I can not answer. In southern climates we recommend using perforated products in that application as it will breathe and not trap moisture on either side of the foil. In northern location, they will typically use the Non-perforated so as to act as a vapor barrier in the winter time.
If you are unsure as to which product to use, I generally recommend using the perforated as there is less risk of trapping or holding moisture on either side of the foil.


Some detailed info on how it works installed can be found here: http://www.doityourself.com/stry/installradiant/

From what I can see, it would be handy to put on the ceiling if you're not planning on covering it up. There are also reflective barrier paints on most radiant barrier company sites.

Over all, the process of putting in the bus is too time consuming for my needs, but for those bus conversions I've seen with them, the slipping them btwn walls (suspended for air space both sides) seems to work great! A lot of work, rather expensive.
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Old 03-04-2010, 09:52 AM   #17
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Re: Sinclair

As for the question about insulating and paneling over the existing wall materials...

I asked that and later updated the post by removing that one.

Still a good question though. Some of us simply do not have the funds or time or talent or tools to do a huge conversion, removing walls, making new ones, etc. For me, tossing up extra air space and paneling is a solution to keeping condensation off my blankets when the touch the walls. *shrug* We'll see.
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Old 03-06-2010, 08:40 AM   #18
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Re: Sinclair

Smitty... yup, you caught me. I get a prize now right?

Researching the roof situation--heat! eek I came across this information on white coating roofs

http://eetd.lbl.gov/coolroof/coating.ht ... 20coatings

Basically, the higher the albedo the less energy absorbed so the cooler the inside becomes.
Problem I see with a lot of the listed coatings is they are that tar, rubbery type coating. Not what I want on the bus, makes for horrible start gazing.

What did everyone else here use?


The Henry's mentioned on this site here and there, I found this info. Doesn't list the albedo rating though.
White Roof Coating Title 24
280DC White Roof Coating
* 10 Year Warranty
* Meets California Commission Title 24
* ASTM D-6083-05
* Miami-Dade County, NOA 04-1027.01
* UL Classified A and B and Fire Rated
* Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC)
* LEED requirements
* Coverage: On smooth surfaces: approx. 2 - 3 gallons per 100 sq. ft. depending on porosity and roughness of surface

Henry also makes:
SolarFlex 287 SF
* Specially formulated to resist mildew in humid climates
* Rich, top-quality, non-fibered elastomeric
* Reflects up to 80%
* Brush, roller or spray application
* Excellent UV resistance
* Coverage: 2.0 gallons/square in 2 coats
Sizes available:
5 gallon
55 gallon
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Old 03-06-2010, 06:08 PM   #19
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Re: Sinclair

Reflectix: works great as a heat barrier. We installed in our 1970's era pop-up roof. Dropped temps down so much that it went from burning (red mark) skin from touching the interior steel roof bows to the whole roof was completely cool to the touch. The barrier was laid between the ABS roof cover and the crappy white styrofoam "insulation". You must allow for an air space for it to work at it's best. That said, we have used it extensively in our current RV. There isn't any airspace. It does work as a radiant barrier still. I also use it as window covers. You will realize benefits from using it in addition to the foamboard. Just not to the extent that you would if you allowed the airspace.

Roof coatings: I push Snow Roof Products (I bought mine thru Ace Hardware). http://www.snowroof.com/catalog.asp
In 2006, on my Class C (1977 with aluminum roof) I patched all seams with Contouring Polyester Seam Tape for Rough Surfaces (embedded in the ElastoSeal Primer). Whole roof was then coated with ElastoSeal Primer. That was then top coated with 2 coats of Snow Roof.

Before we left NM, I started patching the roof on the Blue Bird with the Seam tape (leaky seam and an antenna hole) and covered the tape with ElastoSeal Primer. When we get back to NM, I will finish scraping the silicone caulking off the rest of the seams, taping them then I will prime the whole roof with the primer and roll on a couple of coats of Snow Roof. the Ace hardware store in Socorro carries the Snow products. It is amazing how much just one coat of the Snow roof will drop the temps. Even after applying just the primer, we could feel a difference in the interior temps (and this was in S GA).

I can't really say anything about the products mentioned above but I do have experience with the Snow Roof. I wore long sleeved shirt and long pants. I was barefoot (no sense getting the stuff on my good shoes since it doesn't come off... tossed clothes afterward). The Snow Roof reflects so well that I was sunburned on my legs up to my knees. And it looked good (no washing) 2 years later. I haven't did anything to it (not even cleaned the roof) and it still looks pretty good. And it's much quieter when it rains. The roof is sort of "rubbery".
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Old 03-06-2010, 07:00 PM   #20
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Re: Sinclair

Lorna,

Do you think you could paint the whole bus with the snow roof. I was thinking about it because my bus will be white, and figured it would do the same for the sides of the bus, as it does for the roof.

Does it go on like paint.

Jackie
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