Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-10-2015, 02:16 PM   #31
Skoolie
 
OMGIBoughtABus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: The Lovely PNW
Posts: 143
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner
Engine: Cat 3208
Rated Cap: 84 px
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooternj View Post
Have you tried using a #2 square bit? That's what holds the panels up in my Amtran. Took me about 45 minutes taking them all down
In the Thomas I have they are all rusty #4 Phillips head screws.
__________________
����
OMGIBoughtABus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2015, 02:58 PM   #32
Bus Geek
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 6,177
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
I had very good luck on the 70 year old Phillips heads that hold everything together on my Shorty using an old fashioned, hand held impact driver and a three pound hammer. Once they were broken free, my Milwaukee drill/driver did the rest. Had to use a cut-off blade on some but not many.

http://www.amazon.com/TEKTON-2910-2-...+driver+manual

Hints...buy several extra bits and do use safety glasses.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2015, 07:40 PM   #33
Skoolie
 
Stewzer55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: New Carlisle, Ohio
Posts: 131
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Fisher Body
Chassis: GM "B" Platform
Engine: 350 TBI Chevrolet
Rated Cap: 8
I have a feeling that the manual impact could quickly become a favorite tool, the hammer strike could jar the rust loose. Have you tried giving them a little bit of penetrating oil?
Stewzer55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2015, 07:43 PM   #34
Skoolie
 
OMGIBoughtABus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: The Lovely PNW
Posts: 143
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner
Engine: Cat 3208
Rated Cap: 84 px
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewzer55 View Post
I have a feeling that the manual impact could quickly become a favorite tool, the hammer strike could jar the rust loose. Have you tried giving them a little bit of penetrating oil?
That sounds like a good idea, thanks!
__________________
����
OMGIBoughtABus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2015, 08:52 PM   #35
Bus Geek
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 6,177
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
Most of my screws had 86 coats of paint and were just lumps...so there was no place for the penetrant to go. Whacking does indeed jar the rust and paint loose.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2015, 08:58 PM   #36
Skoolie
 
OMGIBoughtABus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: The Lovely PNW
Posts: 143
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner
Engine: Cat 3208
Rated Cap: 84 px
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Most of my screws had 86 coats of paint and were just lumps...so there was no place for the penetrant to go. Whacking does indeed jar the rust and paint loose.
Hmm I might have to try whacking instead of screwing.
__________________
����
OMGIBoughtABus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2015, 01:16 PM   #37
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Spokane Wa
Posts: 31
Year: 1989
Chassis: Thomas
Engine: 3208 CAT
Rated Cap: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by OMGIBoughtABus View Post
In the Thomas I have they are all rusty #4 Phillips head screws.
I used #2 square bit on all of my screws, you would probably get better grip with the square bit than with the #4 Phillips bit. that's just my opinion though
Cityratt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2015, 02:11 PM   #38
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
Posts: 1,328
Year: 2000
Chassis: Blue Bird
Engine: ISC 8.3
I've been known to stack adapters to reduce my 1/2" air impact wrench to 3/8, then 1/4, then put on a 1/4" hex socket to hold the screw driver bit..... It's perversely satisfying to hear that air wrench zipping sound while pulling out stubborn screws. Several driver tips have been broken by this gross application of way too much torque but often it gets the job done.

Really should pick up one of those manual impact drivers. I bet the thump along the axis of the screw combined with the simultaneous twisting would be very effective.

A chisel digging into the screw head, tangent to the head so that the blows from the hammer apply force in the "un-screw" direction, works well too. It's a nice fall-back when the heads strip out. Air chisel is nice for this; the vibration helps work things loose.
family wagon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2015, 02:53 PM   #39
Bus Geek
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 6,177
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
A torch can also help break nuts, bolts and even sheetmetal screws loose. Oxy, Blow, propane, whatever. But...you do have to keep up with which ones are hot...and which ones are OK to sit on. Ask me how I know.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2015, 09:41 PM   #40
Bus Crazy
 
ol trunt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,962
Year: 1935
Coachwork: Superior
Chassis: Chevy
Engine: 317 ci/tid / Isuzu
I also use the "Tango Tool" but I've learned to use an awl to pick some of the paint out of the slots before I use the tool. That way I can use a 1# hammer to work the tool and it doesn't completely flatten my thumb when I miss.
ol trunt is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.