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Old 01-24-2015, 05:20 PM   #191
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Plus no extra noise from the back while traveling, no rattles , sqeaks or engine noise from the rear
Yup! My sentiments exactly.
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Old 01-24-2015, 09:49 PM   #192
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I too have been planning a partition and door just behind the "cab".
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Old 01-25-2015, 03:39 AM   #193
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Yes, absolutely worthwhile. Raising 18 inches gave me roughly 400 cubic feet of additional volume.
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So far it sounds like 2 votes for "It's not necessary" and no votes from anyone who's raised their roof. For those who've raised their roof, was it not worth the trouble?
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Old 01-25-2015, 03:42 AM   #194
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The metal work to fabricate the transition is really easy. The trick is to make a template from a material that "acts" like sheet metal. A large sheet of thick card stock works perfectly. Just keep trimming it down until it fits.

The curved roof of a school bus makes it even easier, because the curve automatically gives it rigidity when attempting to fit the template into the space.


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Hey allwthrrider, thanks for the insight. I've been inspired by your mod. What I was thinking is, framing the bridge between the lower and upper sections with tubular steel much like you did. Then gluing and screwing 1/4" or 5/16" Okume plywood (marine grade) with epoxy to the frames. This would give me more of a flat transition rather than the radiused one like you did (looks correct on a Crown (love the classic look of those things) but on an AmTran I think it would be just too curvy). The corners would be made the same way but with kerfs cut to allow the plywood to form into place. I would then do a couple 4oz cloth and a couple mat layups with epoxy over both the metal and plywood with filler to blend it into the sheetmetal top. I agree metal would be way cool but I don't have anyone around here that can do that kind of work (might be another skill I nee to teach myself). The top would only have a 12" rise over the distance between two ribs making for a very shallow transition (somewhere in the mid 20's angle). My wife would love windows there but I personally think that shallow a slope will be prone to leaking. The inside would be filleted and laid up as well sealing in the plywood.
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Old 01-25-2015, 06:16 AM   #195
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The metal work to fabricate the transition is really easy. The trick is to make a template from a material that "acts" like sheet metal. A large sheet of thick card stock works perfectly. Just keep trimming it down until it fits.

The curved roof of a school bus makes it even easier, because the curve automatically gives it rigidity when attempting to fit the template into the space.
Thanks aaronsb for the reply. I noticed in your thread you left 2" inside the transition of the original roof to attach the pieces to. I was thinking the same thing before reading about you doing it. Did you bend the bottom up and the top down to make a lip to attach to? Also, I have both Mig and Tig welders here. Was wondering if you welded the entire thing (slowly and gently stitch weld to prevent warping) or end up riveting and then sealing the joint with other means (epoxy and filler)?
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Old 02-01-2015, 07:22 PM   #196
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Started doing some basement framing today. Finally beginning to see what the side profile's gonna look like.



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I am an sojourner in the earth; hide not Your Commandments from me. Psalm 119:19

Here is the patience of the saints; here are the ones keeping the commandments of YAHWEH, and the faith of Yahshua. Rev. 14:12
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Old 02-03-2015, 10:15 AM   #197
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Reply to post #177

Walter Wade runs the shop, and drive for the county school system so you have to catch him between runs. Let me know exactly what you are looking for and I can have a look and take some pics, I live right around the corner from his place and go their quite often, as you might imagine.
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Old 02-03-2015, 03:21 PM   #198
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I stitch welded the transition to the flange on the top and bottom. Technically, you could remove the rivets from the middle ans adjacent high and low roof panels and take the whole piece off in one part.

Because it is relatively thin on a curve, the risk of permanent deformation is low if you stitch it properly. My favorite pattern is thirds, from alternating sides: left to right, right to left, then middle outwards.

The only critical fit is the lower curve. The upper you can cut approximately, then shape with a flap disc to get your edge to join. Along the lower "ear flaps" its just a matter of clamping flat and trimming to match.
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Old 02-03-2015, 07:47 PM   #199
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Got the propane rack finished and on to the right rear next.





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I am an sojourner in the earth; hide not Your Commandments from me. Psalm 119:19

Here is the patience of the saints; here are the ones keeping the commandments of YAHWEH, and the faith of Yahshua. Rev. 14:12
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:04 AM   #200
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Hi Sojourner,
Could you describe the straps and bolts that you used for the tanks?

Thank you
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