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Old 06-03-2015, 08:57 AM   #81
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HolyBus... You make me think of food workers that don't wash their hands after going to the toilet.
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Old 06-03-2015, 09:10 AM   #82
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Yep, same concept. Flies don't wash their feet ever. The fungus issues they must have. Yuck. Try to keep flies out if possible.
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Old 06-03-2015, 07:33 PM   #83
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Not only that but they spit on food to dissolve it to liquid and drink the result.
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Old 06-06-2015, 03:22 PM   #84
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I'm going to be going with a bucket as well. It's cheaper, lighter, greener, and saves water.

As far as humanure goes though, I don't think you should spread it directly in the garden. It needs to cook in a compost bin for a couple of years, along with all of the other things you would compost. I wouldn't put any animal poop directly on my garden either, but plenty of the food we get from the grocery store is grown that way.
Yep, spreading it directly is a sure way to burn the plants. The only poop I know of so far that can be directly spread onto a garden is alpaca feces.. Perhaps if you followed an alpaca diet strictly you could spread your own immediately as well!
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Old 06-06-2015, 05:45 PM   #85
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Spread it & work into the ground before planting, Growing up my dad would make us clean out the septic tank with 5gal buckets on a rope & we spread it on the garden, side note Condoms dont break down in a septic tank
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Old 06-08-2015, 11:22 AM   #86
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Spread it & work into the ground before planting, Growing up my dad would make us clean out the septic tank with 5gal buckets on a rope & we spread it on the garden, side note Condoms dont break down in a septic tank

Though perhaps you don't know it, what you're actually saying is, "don't spread it immediately. Let it decompose for a year or more."

Septic tanks are something akin to a composting pile. You put the crap in and bacteria decomposes it. After the bacteria deals with the liquid, the liquid spreads into the septic field (underground). The solids go to the bottom of the tank where bacteria deal with them as well.

Nonetheless, I would NEVER spread wet, sloppy septic gunk directly onto the ground. The wet environment means that there could be unwanted pathogens still existing in the matter. Spreading directly is inviting the pathogens that you're body expelled (think an intestinal affliction, or the flu) back into the open where small hands can pick it up and bring it back into a body. If it's going directly into the ground, make sure that area is fenced off for quite some time. In my opinion, spreading directly is just bad practice.

In larger quantities our waste IS biohazardous waste.
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Old 06-08-2015, 11:24 AM   #87
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Buried is the best way to deal with poo. Just dig a hole, tip it in, cover over and in a few months it'll just be fertile soil.
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Old 06-08-2015, 11:26 AM   #88
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Buried is the best way to deal with poo. Just dig a hole, tip it in, cover over and in a few months it'll just be fertile soil.

Agreed. If you don't care about spreading it, then burying is the best (far away from a water supply!). As an alternative to spreading manure, you can rotate a garden over top of the buried fertilizer in due time.
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Old 06-08-2015, 02:54 PM   #89
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Used to be a business in Orlando that was treating human waste with worms. They were thin dark red worms. The worm excrement was then sold as fertilizer. That was probably 20 years ago. I remember when they started up because I called and they gave me a small bucket of the worms. I thought I had a great idea. I poured some into my septic and the rest over my drain field area. Big mistake. The excrement and worms clogged the drain field. I later had to have another put in because even having it pressure washed out from the inside didn't clear the perferations in the pipes. Doh! Expensive lesson learned. "when you think you have the answer, maybe there is a reason it is not done that way already"
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Old 06-08-2015, 03:16 PM   #90
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Ah yes.. The red wriggler (eisenia fetida), probably. They make quick work of processing compost (biologically speaking. it still takes months).
We use them for a composting worm bin indoors. I haven't looked into it, but I wonder if they could be introduced to an open, outdoor poop compost pile...
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