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Old 12-28-2013, 06:21 PM   #11
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Re: "Terrapin" the 1989 Thomas

Why is it that you had to load the stove every 2 hours? ..was it not sealed?

..and do you think if we insulated just the floor with 3/4" iso foam board it would make a big difference, or do you think it's necessary to insulate the floor, walls, and ceiling?

By the way it's only getting down to 20-30 degrees F
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Old 12-28-2013, 06:47 PM   #12
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Re: "Terrapin" the 1989 Thomas

Whatever you do about insulation...please...if you get the stove...bolt that sucker down solidly. Like anything, (make that Everything), in a moving vehicle, it must be secured very firmly. Picture either having to slam on your brakes, or worse yet, slamming into something. Every item in and on that bus wants to keep moving forward. Two hundred pounds of cast iron doing 60 miles an hour could potentially do more damage than the crash itself. And it will unless you you secure it properly.

A few sections of something like 2" angle iron can be bolted through the floor and legs for example. Just keep the picture of that flying stove in mind every time you put something on board and you should do OK.
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Old 12-28-2013, 06:55 PM   #13
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Re: "Terrapin" the 1989 Thomas

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skip
Why is it that you had to load the stove every 2 hours? ..was it not sealed?

..and do you think if we insulated just the floor with 3/4" iso foam board it would make a big difference, or do you think it's necessary to insulate the floor, walls, and ceiling?

By the way it's only getting down to 20-30 degrees F
Ceiling first, then walls, floor last. Heat wants to rise. It will get trapped at the Ceiling, and after your walls get insulated, it will push the heat down further into your living space.

No hard wood here. Softwood burns fast. If we want a fire to last all night, we have to use lump coal. My stove back then couldn't handle the intense heat of coal.

Also sectioning off your sleeping space helps. I had 8 foot in one end sectioned off with a blanket.

Nat
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Old 12-28-2013, 07:07 PM   #14
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Re: "Terrapin" the 1989 Thomas

Thanks for the advice tango! ..I will be sure to get some angle iron and bolt 'er down nice and tight

..and about the shield, the wood stove comes with this brick hearth stuff..

How big of a gap should I have between the brick stuff and the wall of the bus, and should I also have a gap between the brick and the floor?
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Old 12-28-2013, 07:41 PM   #15
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Re: "Terrapin" the 1989 Thomas

Quote:
Ceiling first, then walls, floor last. Heat wants to rise. It will get trapped at the Ceiling, and after your walls get insulated, it will push the heat down further into your living space.
..well we have holes in the floor from where the seats used to be
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Old 12-28-2013, 08:15 PM   #16
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Re: "Terrapin" the 1989 Thomas

Holes should go through the support ribs in the floor or have a backer plate on the bottom.

Half inch to a few inches between heat shields. With that stuff you might only need one layer.

Nat
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Old 01-02-2014, 01:33 PM   #17
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Re: "Terrapin" the 1989 Thomas

So I've gathered up some funds and I'm going to insulate soon!


I'm just insulating the floor for now, I plan on using 3/4" iOS foam board, with 1/2" OSB on top, and I wanted some opinions from experienced skoolies..

1) Vapor barrier, is it necessary?

2) Attatching the OSB to the steel floor. I was thinking some floor joists (I guess that what they are called), but .75+.5=1.25 and I don't think they sell wood in that thickness.
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Old 01-02-2014, 11:52 PM   #18
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Re: "Terrapin" the 1989 Thomas

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skip
So I've gathered up some funds and I'm going to insulate soon!


I'm just insulating the floor for now, I plan on using 3/4" iOS foam board, with 1/2" OSB on top, and I wanted some opinions from experienced skoolies..

1) Vapor barrier, is it necessary?

2) Attatching the OSB to the steel floor. I was thinking some floor joists (I guess that what they are called), but .75+.5=1.25 and I don't think they sell wood in that thickness.
What will your finish floor surface be? Hardwood, laminate, vinyl plank, lino, or porcelain tile?

IMO yes Vapor barrier is necessary. Vapor barrier stops the air leaks, and drafts. Insulation stops radiant cold / heat.

Saws make wood any thickness. Rip a 2x4 on edge with a table saw. Turn it over and run it through again as your saw will not have enough depth to cut the whole face of the 2x4 off in a single pass. Now its the thickness you need.

Nat
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Old 01-02-2014, 11:55 PM   #19
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Re: "Terrapin" the 1989 Thomas

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango
Whatever you do about insulation...please...if you get the stove...bolt that sucker down solidly. Like anything, (make that Everything), in a moving vehicle, it must be secured very firmly. Picture either having to slam on your brakes, or worse yet, slamming into something. Every item in and on that bus wants to keep moving forward. Two hundred pounds of cast iron doing 60 miles an hour could potentially do more damage than the crash itself. And it will unless you you secure it properly.

A few sections of something like 2" angle iron can be bolted through the floor and legs for example. Just keep the picture of that flying stove in mind every time you put something on board and you should do OK.
After bolting my stove to the floor, I used 1/2" EMT as a shield around the threads, I will paint it stove black later.
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Old 01-03-2014, 11:08 AM   #20
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Re: "Terrapin" the 1989 Thomas

Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster

What will your finish floor surface be? Hardwood, laminate, vinyl plank, lino, or porcelain tile?

Nat
Hardwood floors... eventually
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