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Old 02-06-2016, 04:21 AM   #11
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: West Kootenays, BC
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Year: 2003
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Sweet! How are the temps in that bus with the stove? And do you have a dedicated fresh air intake on that unit? IF so, where? Thanks!
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Old 02-06-2016, 04:31 AM   #12
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Year: 1994
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i just put it in this afternoon so i don't have that data yet... it will have an outside air intake, haven't put that in yet tho
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Old 02-06-2016, 10:36 AM   #13
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Nice looking stove! Can the chimney easily be removed for travelling?
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Old 02-06-2016, 01:57 PM   #14
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yes, the 3 ft section connects to a 6" section that goes through the boot so the 3ft section can just be pulled off leaving just ~6" sticking out which I can put a cap on, should work fine.
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Old 02-06-2016, 04:11 PM   #15
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Please wear at a minimum a paper mask and use fans to exhaust the rust dust while using the grinder and wire wheel. Build for the climate you plan on spending your most time in. The flue pipe or smoke stack out of the roof in my opinion needs to have an elbow to turn the top away from the rain and double wall pipe is definetly needed and I would recommend something (in my world called a hot boot (by commercial contractors) I use them for steam vents and they are rated for 6-8000 degrees. A one time install from the roofer that has a 50-year warranty on the penetrations in there roof.
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Old 02-06-2016, 04:19 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolly Roger View Post
The flue pipe or smoke stack out of the roof in my opinion needs to have an elbow to turn the top away from the rain
This is poor advice for a chimney install. 90 elbows significantly reduce the chimney's draft. The appropriate solution is to use a chimney cap. It appears that one has already been installed.

I used an orange, flexible dektite seal (hot boot. I like it) at the roof and it has been holding up well.
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Old 02-07-2016, 02:57 AM   #17
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When I was grinding the rust I could only do it for 30 minutes tops at a time due to the batteries not lasting very long, I wore a mask/bandana and had the windows open but due to it being off grid I couldn't have fans running to vent the dust. I always did the grinding towards the end of my time so as not to be in the presence of that dust very long... it is definitely something you do not want to breathe in.

I agree with jatzy regarding the chimney, I read as much as I could find on this forum before installing and talked to the guys at the local woodstove/hardware store for a few hours before putting it in.
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Old 02-07-2016, 10:53 AM   #18
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Both Home Depot and Lowe's offer free ship to local store on many items they do not stock normally if you want a thinker or thinner size on the insulation .

I usually shop online to see whats available at my store and find what I want if not stocked and prepay to get it sent to the store . The contractors desk can help you even if you are not one too.
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Old 02-07-2016, 02:40 PM   #19
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I agree and disagree on the flue piping. I do commercial boiler installs for a living and of course the exhaust flue is not removed and capped when not used if I use a straight up hood then I have to turn an elbow within x-amount of distance into a tee with a drain because blowing rain, and just condensation in the piping from being exposed to the weather will drip back into the equipment when sitting idle. We have gone to using two elbows to make a turn down with a bird screen. It solves the problem of the blowing rain but not really the condensation so the new talk is the tee with drain for the outer layer and double elbows because double wall pipe does its job but the outer layer is what condensates. If the flue is sized for the install then it won't matter how many twist or turns you need. I know this was probably more info. Than needed for a wood stove but I try to build to last and never look back? And where I live it's freezing one day and 80's the next and I have seen a lot of boilers rusted out before there time because of the flue pipe including cast iron billion BTU's that cost the owners 800,000 to replace because of improper flue piping.
I can't disagree with your install or jatzy's advice all I can do is provide my experience with flue piping whether it is poor advice or not is up to each individual to decide there own path. If you can't figure out why the bottom of your stove rots out quicker than expected please think about this. I do government work and even with the new technology boilers that use PVC piping for exhaust we do elbows and tees with drains to get the condensation away from the metal heater whether it is fuel/oil, natural gas, propane and even coal fired that is fed 24/7. I just helped rebuild 3 out of 14 that provide steam for an entire base. Steam fitter/welder by trade and just trying to relay some experience until the residential world catches up
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Old 02-19-2016, 01:35 AM   #20
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Year: 1994
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I tried to move the bus today because it appears there is a seasonal creek quite close... anyways, the ground is too muddy to move it right now... should be fine. But when I went to shut the bus off I ran into some confusion, when I bought the bus the dude who showed it to me told me about how turning the key off doesn't shut the bus off... Okay... so he showed me how to basically kill the engine by what I seem to remember was turning some kind of throttle lever down stalling it out... When I parked the bus back in the fall I turned it off in this way, but when I went to turn that throttle lever down today I couldn't find it anywhere... I looked for a long time not sure what the hell to do, after 20 minutes of trying to read through the manuals and looking around I read in the trouble shooting part that some spring that triggers when you turn the key off might be loose, so I turned it off repeatedly and after 4-5 times of just turning the key off the engine shut down.

I'm wondering if anyone knows of the throttle lever? That I'm talking about. The floor is almost done, everything is looking good, I'll have some pics soon.
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