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Old 07-16-2014, 05:25 PM   #11
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Re: The Broccoli Bus

We went out for dinner last night, and all three girls were drawing their bus design ideas on the back of the kids menus. I hope they're this enthusiastic when I'm removing dry rotted plywood and a grillion bus seats.

After the comments about the insulation, I'm considering pulling one or two panels to inspect the insulation and either put it right back, or pull it all down and replace with foil backed hard foam. I like some of the other techniques I've seen replacing with wood paneling and whatnot, but I think that steel lends a lot of strength to the body. I am also most comfortable working with metal over other materials.

As for the lower cargo area, I'm pretty excited to have that, there is a ton of room in there for the utility closet/garage as far as water tanks and generators and whatnot go.

I forgot to add, it seems like it's got 5 speeds, and turns over about 1600 RPM @ 65 MPH indicated.
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Old 07-16-2014, 09:17 PM   #12
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Re: The Broccoli Bus

Welcome and NICE LUGGAGE BAYS!!

If you leave the headliner panels in and choose not to add insulation, you're going to be hot when it's hot and cold when it's cold. The inferiority of fiberglass batt is well documented. On top of that, the headliner panels (and their rivets) are in direct contact with the structural skeleton of the bus, which is in direct contact with the outer skin of the bus. Steel is an excellent conductor of heat, so despite the fiberglass placed in between each rib, hot/cold is going to "bleed" straight through the steel into the inside of your cabin.

If you choose to add insulation on the inside of the headliner panels (leaving them in), you're wasting headroom. Many people advocate a "roof raise" for skoolie conversions, but if you're willing to do a roof raise, you're willing to remove headliner panels anyway. So if you're not willing to chop your roof off, jack it up and rivet on some extensions, it's wise to conserve headroom where you can.

Whichever way you go, you have a great bus. Best of luck!
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Old 07-18-2014, 05:01 PM   #13
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Re: The Broccoli Bus

Ok, bus is now paid for!

I'm leaving it at the service dept. for a few days for some work - new batteries and a front left hub bearing and seal replacement. I stopped by the DOL and I need to get it weighed and emissions tested first before converting the title to an RV.
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Old 07-18-2014, 05:03 PM   #14
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Raised roof

I know it's probably been talked about all over, but I'm nearly 100% certain I'm going to lift the roof.

I can't remember which member I saw also did a lift, but I think I'd like to leave about the first 6' or so of the cab original, then add a ramp up to the higher section and leave the rest to the back higher. There appears to be a lot of benefits to a raised roof.
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Old 07-18-2014, 05:36 PM   #15
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Re: The Broccoli Bus

Nice bus. Mine is similar, except for the cool emergency door and luggage comp. Welcome to the place where all your spare time goes.
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Old 07-18-2014, 06:48 PM   #16
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Re: Raised roof

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsb
I know it's probably been talked about all over, but I'm nearly 100% certain I'm going to lift the roof.

I can't remember which member I saw also did a lift, but I think I'd like to leave about the first 6' or so of the cab original, then add a ramp up to the higher section and leave the rest to the back higher. There appears to be a lot of benefits to a raised roof.
Thats how I did mine

viewtopic.php?f=9&t=466636

Also lookup

The Journey Visvi 1999 Thomas MVPER, he did a very good job of showing how to lift a roof, maybe a little over kill but very good
Stuart
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Old 07-18-2014, 07:20 PM   #17
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Re: The Broccoli Bus

Ha! Spare time? I like you.

4 kids, a house we'd rather eventually downsize from, a side business rebuilding Unimogs, and an actual full time IT job. I think it's all about prioritization, and I'd like to make a large push to rearrange a few things in my life so my family becomes higher on the list. Not sayin' this is the means to an end, but I think it's a fundamental shift in the way my wife and I are going to be doing things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LandLubber
Nice bus. Mine is similar, except for the cool emergency door and luggage comp. Welcome to the place where all your spare time goes.
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Old 07-18-2014, 07:23 PM   #18
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Re: Raised roof

Yes, the profile you cut is nearly exactly what I intend to do. Except for the part that I don't have a crown chassis.
Quote:
Originally Posted by allwthrrider
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsb
I know it's probably been talked about all over, but I'm nearly 100% certain I'm going to lift the roof.

I can't remember which member I saw also did a lift, but I think I'd like to leave about the first 6' or so of the cab original, then add a ramp up to the higher section and leave the rest to the back higher. There appears to be a lot of benefits to a raised roof.
Thats how I did mine

viewtopic.php?f=9&t=466636

Also lookup

The Journey Visvi 1999 Thomas MVPER, he did a very good job of showing how to lift a roof, maybe a little over kill but very good
Stuart
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Old 07-23-2014, 12:32 AM   #19
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Re: The Broccoli Bus

I picked up the bus today, some new batteries and a hub seal and bearing replacement (the front left oil was water contaminated)

The DOL in Kent wants to see a Washington State Patrol inspection before they'll issue me a title change from bus to RV. I was thinking of "shopping" around to some of the other offices and see what they do. Previously they also told me that I needed to get the scale weight and emissions tested. I'm half expecting the next time I show up they'll tell me it needs to be retrofitted with air bags or an emergency parachute system.

Next step is disconnect batteries and pop on a tender, and remove seats.
Then windows
then make roof taller
then close the roof up
then put sheet metal on the walls
etc.

Does anyone have an opinion on galvanized sheet metal for the sides vs. plain? What thickness? I was considering 18 gauge galv. I don't mind welding small areas of galv metal, grinding or positive pressure respirator solves the toxic fumes.

Size comparison to a Unimog.


Getting the emissions tested in Renton. Yes, it passed.


It fits beside the garage! Level ground = roof raise. I am happy.
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Old 07-25-2014, 12:51 AM   #20
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Seats out

Took about two and a half hours. Started at 7 pm. It wasn't too bad.

Grossest part? Reaching between the seat and the wall to find the bolts.
Stinkiest? Setting dried up pine-sol on fire with the grinder.
Most satisfying? Popping out the bolts through the floor with the air chisel.
Hardest seat? The rear right seat next to the exit door.





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