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Old 04-17-2015, 03:02 PM   #451
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Or just use scaffold jacks to lift the roof like I did.

Nothing to build, Safe, and scaffold can be rented anywhere.

Nat
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Old 04-17-2015, 05:33 PM   #452
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
Or just use scaffold jacks to lift the roof like I did.

Nothing to build, Safe, and scaffold can be rented anywhere.
Been thinking about that, too. My dad has two pairs of 6 ft scaffold and two screw jacks, and for some reason I also have one screw jack but no scaffold to go with it, so I'd need to rent five more. Not sure how much vertical travel they have though. It's really a tough call. I also have two pairs of cheap light-duty scaffold which I wouldn't use for doing the lift, but may set up inside to catch the roof should it fall.

aaronsb, I was headed down a similar path thinking about modifying the design you pictured, and it was primarily driven by a desire to get the threaded rod into a tension arrangement. Here's what I came up with (thanks to PDBreske for encouraging us all to give SketchUp a whirl!). The threaded rod has to be longer than the required lift by at least the thickness of two nuts, a washer, and the two brackets -- maybe an inch and some change? I drew this with 1" tube for the guide post, 1.25" for the trolleys (each 14 ga/0.083" wall) and an 18" by 3/4" threaded rod, but of course it can scale.


The upper nut is welded to the rod, so the roof goes up when the upper nut is turned. With a hex socket to electric drill adapter, in theory.
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Old 04-17-2015, 06:13 PM   #453
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You only need two scaffold frames and 4 jacks.

Scaffold is more than strong enough. It's made to stack to unreal heights.

All the pics are in my thread.



Using the threaded rod lifters has only one advantage over the scaffold. I was constantly climbing through the scaffold moving around the bus. Lifting from the pillars with the threaded rod leaves the interior wide open to move around.

The roof is not nearly as heavy as you think.

Nat
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Old 04-17-2015, 06:19 PM   #454
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I raised my 40' BB with a single barn jack that I moved from corner to corner. Of course I had some "guides" tacked in place, but my ex and I took it up 19" in a few hours.

Nat is right, the roof is big but not really that heavy.
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Old 04-17-2015, 06:23 PM   #455
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I like the design you put there, it seems like it would work great. Something to consider on your choice of height recalibration tool is accuracy afforded by different mechanisms. With the jacks bolted to both ends on four corners, I had very precise control of the height.

Scaffold jacks work for this too, if attached in a secure way.


Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
Been thinking about that, too. My dad has two pairs of 6 ft scaffold and two screw jacks, and for some reason I also have one screw jack but no scaffold to go with it, so I'd need to rent five more. Not sure how much vertical travel they have though. It's really a tough call. I also have two pairs of cheap light-duty scaffold which I wouldn't use for doing the lift, but may set up inside to catch the roof should it fall.

aaronsb, I was headed down a similar path thinking about modifying the design you pictured, and it was primarily driven by a desire to get the threaded rod into a tension arrangement. Here's what I came up with (thanks to PDBreske for encouraging us all to give SketchUp a whirl!). The threaded rod has to be longer than the required lift by at least the thickness of two nuts, a washer, and the two brackets -- maybe an inch and some change? I drew this with 1" tube for the guide post, 1.25" for the trolleys (each 14 ga/0.083" wall) and an 18" by 3/4" threaded rod, but of course it can scale.


The upper nut is welded to the rod, so the roof goes up when the upper nut is turned. With a hex socket to electric drill adapter, in theory.
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Old 04-17-2015, 08:02 PM   #456
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I am new around here, but I wanted to take a minute to compliment the excellent work you've done so far. She's looking great! I really like how you are using the metal framework. I'll be passing that tip along to my hubby! Well done, and I can't wait to see how she turns out!
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Old 04-18-2015, 08:15 AM   #457
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I'm a little surprised I don't see more fiberglass used. Is it because of the difficulty in working with it, cost, or something else? Fiberglass would never oil-can or buckle in this way.

Another option would be to take a lesson out of the RV industry's book: a layered sheet. An 1/8" or 1/4" sheet of H45 or H100 would add a huge amount of rigidity to a sheet of aluminum or galv. and you can just bond them together with adhesives. They're both reasonably cheap, you can still attach with rivets (just need a longer one, and use normal break rivets, not high-strength), and you get an unexpected but maybe cool advantage: it's a lot harder to dent. It's also a thermal break.

It's not free but the thinnest sheets might only add a couple hundred bucks. I'm seriously considering this route myself - if I do, I'll report back here on the results.
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Old 04-18-2015, 11:58 AM   #458
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One concern I have about using the threaded rod method.

If the weld attaching the threaded rod lifter to the hat Chanel breaks, the roof falls on you.

Using the scaffold jack method, there is nothing that can break, so the roof can't fall.

If using the threaded rod lifters, I would still have something else there to keep it from crushing you in a worst case scenario.

I also used my new hat chanels splices to guide the roof up strait. I slid them over the vertical support rib hat chanels that I cut, and clamped them only on the bottom, below the cut. This forced the roof to stay strait as it slowly raised.

As the roof went up inch by inch, I would also raise the hat chanel splices, always reclamping below the cut line. This way if the roof fell, the new hat chanel splices would take the full weight of the roof.

On the right you can see the blue camp holding the bottom of the new hat chanel.



Nat
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Old 04-18-2015, 07:18 PM   #459
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I has to dig around for a photo, I did not take many when lifting because I was too excited to get it back together.

You can see how the jacks sat and the strap holding the halves together.
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Old 04-18-2015, 10:26 PM   #460
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Sorry man, but that looks scarey as hell.

You have no safety measures in place to keep that roof from crushing you.

The entire roofs weight is being held by the few small welds where the lifters attach to the ribs.

Even a simple 2x4 frame would have been better than nothing.

Remember fellow skoolies, even when we get excited, we still need to keep working safely.

Nat
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