Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-21-2016, 08:16 PM   #681
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 648
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
Yes, insulation will eventually find it's way into the door. I basically have to fabricate the "inside skin" of the door. I'll probably insulate door with 2" foam.

It's technically an auto UNlock, so you don't slap the door open pneumatic switch and just stress the hell out of the door and it's hinges. The way it will work is air goes to unlocker ram first, once it engages the latch and releases, air switch allows air to flow to opening side of double acting ram for the door hinge actuator.

The door must "bump" open first to open the valve for the pressurized air to physically reach the door swing ram.

On closing, the latch is open, and captures the pin.

If you open the door manually from the outside or the inside by pulling the lever, the valve is just sort of floats, acting as if you flipped the "emergency release" switch above the door in an unmodified bluebird bifold pneumatic door.

At some point in the future I may replace the double circuit pneumatic switch on the dash with an electronic one, so I can push a keyfob button to open and close the bus door.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Docsgsxr View Post
I'm going to assume you are waiting to get everything on the inside of the door completed before you insulate and add the panel for the inside?? And yeah, the auto lock sounds like a great idea. maybe you can get a remote actuator to use a key FOB with it.
aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2016, 08:26 PM   #682
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 446
What are you using to cover the wall framing and how are you going to attach it to the steel? Sikaflex..............self drilling metal screws.........rivets.....? Inquiring minds want to know Awesome build!
dgorila1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2016, 08:28 PM   #683
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 648
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
Don't have any more pics right now, not done. Note that the door handle does NOT have a lock built into it. I have a flush mount 5 pin mortise lock on the outside, which is attached to an additional dead bolt in the door frame.
The dead bolt and mortise lock are attached via linkage to the bear claw lock so it's a double lock setup. (bear claw won't release unless it's unlocked too)

If the cylinder lock and deadbolt are engaged, then the pneumatic unlock actuator will fire but not unlock, and it won't pop the door, and then the air for the opener ram will just make an angry loud hissing sound because it's vented through the air switch.

I suppose I could put some party whistles, a wig wag, or maybe some streamers on the air outlet. Maybe an inflatable balloon with the words "unlock me printed on it". (I mostly kidding)



Here's a parts list.

Momentary pneumatic pin switch with spring return I already had. Air routes out one port or the other. Unlocker ram plumbed to the normally closed position. When door is closed on pin switch, it's open, allowing air to open ram and prevent from getting to door actuator. Once door opens via mechanical release, pin switch routes air to door hinge actuator ram.

Robot Check

Robot Check

Robot Check

Amazon.com: Crown Automotive 55076222 Right Outside Door Paddle Handle (Black): Automotive


Quote:
Originally Posted by dgorila1 View Post

Looking great aaron! Can you provide more pics of the door latch and opener and what parts are needed to construct it. Neat looking setup.
aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2016, 08:29 PM   #684
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 648
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
I'll probably be using a mix of materials, thin ply, foam, plastic. Most likely I'll use stainless blind rivets to attach the panels and materials to the steel tubing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dgorila1 View Post
What are you using to cover the wall framing and how are you going to attach it to the steel? Sikaflex..............self drilling metal screws.........rivets.....? Inquiring minds want to know Awesome build!
aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2016, 01:35 AM   #685
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 648
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
Cabinet progress

One of the kitchen cabinets coming together. This is the largest unit by volume. Designed to hold dishes, tools, other kitcheny things.

Next up is a full height pull out pantry and some wall and overhead cabinets.

Drawer clamped in "for illustration". I'll paint the frame before the slider installation.

aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2016, 07:26 AM   #686
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 3,114
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International S3800
Engine: DT360
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsb View Post
One of the kitchen cabinets coming together. This is the largest unit by volume. Designed to hold dishes, tools, other kitcheny things.

Next up is a full height pull out pantry and some wall and overhead cabinets.

Drawer clamped in "for illustration". I'll paint the frame before the slider installation.

kitchen cabinet looks cool!!

one of the things im looking at for a cabinet in my bus is one of the Computer Server Rack cabinets.. your cabinet reminds me of one of those..

they can be had super cheap on the liquidator market and came in all different heights.. or if you are making your own door you can easily cut them down and reinstall the top portion.. most times they come with the nice slides already installed and you can add shelves or tubs as you have done with yours.. I realize yours is done.. just posting for others who may want to use the idea..

I like the steel inside.. big challenge to me seems is how to keep it from rattling a lot on the road.... though wood can creak, steel loves to rattle.. but I like the idea of it!

also like the door mechanism.. what happens in an emergency situation / panic.. ie fire. . can the door be opened easily without having to flip a switch, or say all the air lines have gone flat.. how does the door act? does it unlock? or lock and easily openable by lever on the inside?

-Christopher
cadillackid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2016, 09:53 AM   #687
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 648
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
Yep, definitely server rack inspired. I'll put a little adhesive damping material in the sheet metal mounting strips to keep the vibration down. Standard server racks I found were too deep, and telecom racks inadequate.

The drawer sliders all have elastic buffers to keep things tight.

The front door will have a red handle just like the original emergency doors on the sides and rear. Due to the mechanical nature of the air system, it will default to a slack mode as soon as it is mechanically operated. Even if all the air system failed in the pressurized mode, it is possible to just push the door open against the full air pressure.

Additionally, the glass can be pushed out of that door. I may make a mechanism to quick release a security screen from the inside.

The extra deadbolt lock presents an obstacle, but I think some clear instructions (1: unlock deadbolt 2: lift lever) ought to be enough.

I have seen people drill and install deadbolts locks and latches (on the outside, through the handles!) on schoolbus emergency exit doors in far more immobile ways. I feel pretty secure that my 5 year old can easily get out unassisted. We have practiced safety drills a few times.

The 2 year old still needs a little help but that is intentional.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
kitchen cabinet looks cool!!

one of the things im looking at for a cabinet in my bus is one of the Computer Server Rack cabinets.. your cabinet reminds me of one of those..

they can be had super cheap on the liquidator market and came in all different heights.. or if you are making your own door you can easily cut them down and reinstall the top portion.. most times they come with the nice slides already installed and you can add shelves or tubs as you have done with yours.. I realize yours is done.. just posting for others who may want to use the idea..

I like the steel inside.. big challenge to me seems is how to keep it from rattling a lot on the road.... though wood can creak, steel loves to rattle.. but I like the idea of it!

also like the door mechanism.. what happens in an emergency situation / panic.. ie fire. . can the door be opened easily without having to flip a switch, or say all the air lines have gone flat.. how does the door act? does it unlock? or lock and easily openable by lever on the inside?

-Christopher
aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2016, 10:54 AM   #688
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 3,114
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International S3800
Engine: DT360
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsb View Post
Yep, definitely server rack inspired. I'll put a little adhesive damping material in the sheet metal mounting strips to keep the vibration down. Standard server racks I found were too deep, and telecom racks inadequate.

The drawer sliders all have elastic buffers to keep things tight.

The front door will have a red handle just like the original emergency doors on the sides and rear. Due to the mechanical nature of the air system, it will default to a slack mode as soon as it is mechanically operated. Even if all the air system failed in the pressurized mode, it is possible to just push the door open against the full air pressure.

Additionally, the glass can be pushed out of that door. I may make a mechanism to quick release a security screen from the inside.

The extra deadbolt lock presents an obstacle, but I think some clear instructions (1: unlock deadbolt 2: lift lever) ought to be enough.

I have seen people drill and install deadbolts locks and latches (on the outside, through the handles!) on schoolbus emergency exit doors in far more immobile ways. I feel pretty secure that my 5 year old can easily get out unassisted. We have practiced safety drills a few times.

The 2 year old still needs a little help but that is intentional.
I think unlocking a deadbolt and pulling a lever is more than sufficient for egress.. its no different than being in a house and having to unlock a lock and turning a knob to get out. I wasnt sure how the air doors worked, if they were against a spring or not.. mine are standard manual bus doors... the kind that have the cool "school bus door squeak" when you open them.

im planning to lock both of my doors with house locks.. the simple way seen on here with a deadbolt key lock on the outside and on the inside a turn knob then can pull the OEM handle.. and im not going to remove the roof hatch.. though my roomate thinks I should make it a bubble skylight like the 70s 'Leisure vans' had...

I got lucky and got hold of a nice little security camera rack.. which will work perfect for what im doing, and im definitely stealing your idea of plastic bins for drawers!, Love it.. I was trying to retrofit kitchen doors inside the cabinet.. using the rack's OEM door latch will keep the drawers closed when im rolling.. I may end up taking the sides off and making my own as the sides on the rack are crazy heavy.. adding lots of weight..

-christopher
cadillackid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2016, 10:27 AM   #689
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Maple Ridge BC Canada
Posts: 191
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: TC2000 Rear engine
Engine: Cummins 8.3; MD3060
Rated Cap: 84
It is great to see someone building EVERYTHING from steel. Most people will go wood way because it is easier for them. You choose steel because it is easier for you. Somebody will build everything from aluminum because he is a good TIG welder....

This is why we start this kind of projects because we want it to be built the way we want and like....

The whole point of sharing info is to help each other. I found many great things in aaronsb build and will use some. I do have some usefull ideas and everyone is welcome to use them.
__________________
Here is my conversion thread:
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/98-bluebird-tc2000-conversion-2-feet-roof-raise-3-slideouts-9728.html
Vlad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2016, 04:37 PM   #690
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 648
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
Welding more sticks together.

Full height slide out pantry

aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.