Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-30-2016, 01:08 PM   #821
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 3,079
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International S3800
Engine: DT360
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
oh yeah lookin good!! Looks a lot more like a camper now and lot less like a school bus!! seems to me thats the right direction!!!

-Christopher
cadillackid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2016, 02:24 PM   #822
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
Posts: 947
Year: 2000
Chassis: Blue Bird
Engine: ISC 8.3
It's looking fantastic. Having that base color finished must feel like a big milestone, and a big relief to have a lot of work now protected against the weather.
family wagon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2016, 03:50 AM   #823
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 648
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
Got the second color on.



Rub rails and wheel well fender strip get truck bed liner black.
aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2016, 09:10 AM   #824
Skoolie
 
Offgr1d's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 174
Year: 1998
Chassis: VanHool T945
Engine: Cummins M11
Rated Cap: 47,000
This is looking awesome!! Congrats Aaron!
Offgr1d is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2016, 09:47 AM   #825
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Indiana
Posts: 18
Your bus is looking really close to the drawings I have for mine.
T-Bolt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2016, 03:40 PM   #826
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 1
Just binge read all 83 pages of this. By far the most impressive build I've found so far. I'll be borrowing numerous design features from you and will continue to follow your thread.
Forts19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2016, 12:08 AM   #827
Skoolie
 
wunderhut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Farmington, IL
Posts: 147
Year: 1990
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: AARE 3903
Engine: Cummins 6CTA 8.3
Rated Cap: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsb View Post
Fix some of the bent luggage bay doors properly, stripping off thick layers of bondo and hammer/dolly back to straight and true. (There's a relatively easy way to do this, ask and I will explain)
I'm asking.

Looks awesome!
wunderhut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2016, 01:56 AM   #828
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 648
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
OK, so here goes. If you got questions just ask.

So I'm assuming you don't have completely destroyed doors, like no tears in the sheet metal or completely folded over. Bent, creased curved is what I started with.


Tools and stuff:

4x rivet gun with plenishing hammer

Sturdy solid saw horse, about the height needed to prop the door open horizontally.

A length of angle iron, probably 1.5x1.5x.125, and just short enough to fit one side in the inside groove where the bulb seal would go.

A bigass piece of flatbar, 6x.5x some length long enough to also prop the door about horizontal. This will be part of the strong back to keep things from bouncing around.

A gravel driveway, or some very solid surface to absorb impact.

Hammer and dolly set.

Straight edge.

Sorry I don't have pictures right now but I'll do my best.

Let's assume you have a concave bent door (where it has been pushed outward), with a bend about midline horizontal inward, and a crunched forward corner, as well as a large horizontal crease.

The first thing to remember is that the steel has stretched, and we will basically be shrinking this steel back together. I like to visualize sheet metal as a kind of very thin rigid clay.

You can mash it together and stretch it apart.

We will tackle the large concave bend first.

The side flanges will have poked out, so start by balancing the lower edge of the door against the saw horse, and find the peak of the bend on both ends. Lay your angle iron on the bend and press upon it (even sit on it) concentrating on the ends.

The middle sheet is flexible and most of the rigidity comes from the braked ends. As you press down, the front and back edge will bow in or out.

Get the door fairly flat(ish) then address the flanges with the plenishing hammer to return them to 90 degree angles. The door will pop back to a bent shape, but not as much. Repeat the process until you have diminished returns, and you'll find its pretty darn flat. Its easy to overdo this and bend the whole thing the other direction, so use little moves once its getting close.

You may need to use a large dead blow to knock the center of the panel a bit flatter, but be careful not to make a big dent the other direction. Use lots of small strong blows.

Next is the bent corner.

Prop the door up with an edge of your angle iron under it, resting on the saw horse, and the edge tucked into where the bulb seal would sit. This will be your hammer guide.

Note that it arches high towards where your inward bend is at. This is where you will work first. Use the plenishing hammer to smoothly apply blows back and forth over the arched section, against the edge of the angle iron below. You'll start to see immediate results, with the outside edge bowing in or out. You'd like to encourage it to bow outwards, so if its not going that way, hammer that edge a bit outwards first to give it a start in the right direction. If you let it bend inwards its a lot more work to accurately bend it straight again, so don't do that.

As you hammer the edge back to a 90 degree angle, the bow will form again. Like the first step, you need to repeat the process a few times until diminishing returns.

Now for the crease.

Use the bigass bar to place it under the crease, (inwards or outwards crease, doesn't really matter)

The bar will transfer the energy into the ground, backing blows from your dolly hammer or plenishing hammer. I highly recommended the plenishing hammer because I'd guess several thousand strokes are necessary to get it right (for all these operations)

Be sure you're not supporting the weight of the door only on that bar. The bar should just be there to resist the blows, and the saw horse to support the door. Otherwise you'll end up creating a large bullseye in the middle where youve been hammering at.

Anyway work back and forth on the crease, moving your bar with you to back the blows. Note that it may cause the metal to oil can if you just use a couple big strikes, if you use hundreds of small ones it tends to shrink the metal more. I haven't had to use a shrinking hammer, disc, or torch yet to remove oil cans when I use a plenishing hammer.

Finally, use the hammer (manual or plenisbing) and dolly,bar,or angle iron to continue to true the corners and faces until you're happy with it. You can over work it, so at some point its best to use a little body skim filler to finish it.

A little skim filler is 100 times better than a giant glob of bondo to fill a bent door flat. It just needs to be geometricly close.



Quote:
Originally Posted by wunderhut View Post
I'm asking.

Looks awesome!
aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2016, 08:14 AM   #829
Bus Nut
 
sojourner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 379
Year: 1995
Engine: DT408
Looks great!!

You said "Rub rails and wheel well fender strip get truck bed liner black."

We're doing the same thing but am also considering painting the entire bus in bed liner. We're not looking for a high finish vehicle on the outside but rather a more utility look since a school bus is basically already that. We're thinking the tough finish of bed liner will wear well boondocking and also quiet and seal the structure. Still looking in to how to spray it on to give a more smooth texture than the splattered orange peel so common with bed liner coatings. Any thoughts?
__________________
I am an sojourner in the earth; hide not Your Commandments from me. Psalm 119:19

Here is the patience of the saints; here are the ones keeping the commandments of YAHWEH, and the faith of Yahshua. Rev. 14:12
sojourner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2016, 10:11 AM   #830
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 648
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
Catalyst cured urethane paint is extremely tough. Its on our bus with a medium orange peel for just that reason, to resist scratching.

If you don't sand the vehicle, then remove dust and grease and wax, the paint will fall off. Truck bed liner will just come off in big sheets.

Also, the finer the grit of sanding, up to a point, the better the adhesion. I sanded just to 120 and called it done. The fleet color urethane cost $150 a gallon.

I used a Wagner flexio turbine sprayer, with the smaller finish sprayer. Mostly because my air compressor has lots of blowby and seems prone to moisture, so I would need a lot of expensive prefiltering to use a regulat hvlp gun.

This gave surprisingly good results. Shoot your first tack coat, then go back and apply your additional coats for coverage.

Like everyone else says, preparing the paint job is the most important part, so sanding, priming bare metal, then masking and cleaning everything.

I guess this is a roundabout way of saying I would not use bed liner on the sides, I think it will look like a giant marshmallow. I fully endorse it on the roof though!

Quote:
Originally Posted by sojourner View Post
Looks great!!

You said "Rub rails and wheel well fender strip get truck bed liner black."

We're doing the same thing but am also considering painting the entire bus in bed liner. We're not looking for a high finish vehicle on the outside but rather a more utility look since a school bus is basically already that. We're thinking the tough finish of bed liner will wear well boondocking and also quiet and seal the structure. Still looking in to how to spray it on to give a more smooth texture than the splattered orange peel so common with bed liner coatings. Any thoughts?
aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.