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Old 08-05-2015, 11:23 PM   #21
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Location: South Carolina, but headed back to Michigan
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Year: 1991
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Leaks are fixed from the outside, not the inside...
What about the ability to address the damage that new leaks may cause? I don't know how hard it will be to recognize the new leaks, but I'd like to be able to remove a panel of insulation, allow it to dry out and treat any rust. Maybe I am overly paranoid about potential mold and rust there.

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...You need a alternator with a higher duty cycle.

Using your alternator to charge your house battery's is the worst, and highest cost method of all options available.


Nat
Until I am at a point where I am more off-grid capable, I'll be using the grid to charge for smaller excursions. Sounds like I have some reading and learning to do. Most of the electronics I read on this site goes right over my head.
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1991 International. DT360. Spicer 5-speed manual transmission. Work in progress; spray foam, wood stove, etc...
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Old 08-06-2015, 01:58 AM   #22
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Once you paint the outside of the bus with elastomeric paint, you should have no new leaks.

In a house you don't need to open walls, why would you in a bus?

Nat
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Old 08-06-2015, 09:56 AM   #23
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If it is extra juice you are looking for while driving...check out the electrical systems on board fire trucks & EMS units. They run monster alts (sometimes 2-3 of them) and power a long list of critical equipment including a/c's.

But as Nat noted...trying to use the engine as the power source while stationery is just pi$$ing dollars down the the drain.
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Old 08-06-2015, 10:45 AM   #24
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Maybe I am overly paranoid about potential mold and rust there.
Once you've replaced the original fiberglass with with something not fiberglass (spray or rigid foam), treated the existing rusts and leaks you should be fine.
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Old 08-07-2015, 09:13 PM   #25
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Got my riveting tool in the mail today. Seems like decent quality. An air setup would be nice, but just isn't in the cards for me right now. This one got good reviews from people who do fabrication for a living. I know the bus will not be the only place it is used.

I will be having a friend or two over tomorrow to help finish the gutting. Windows, panels and insulation will be removed. I believe the way the wall panels are made on this bus, I have to take the windows out, unless I wish to cut the panels out. I figure, the windows are coming out anyways. I will have to buy a tarp or two to keep the rain from getting inside.

With it gutted, I can begin work on rust removal and order panels to patch over 11 windows. One side will get 3 and a half (a small window for the bathroom), the other will have most of the windows so we can park the bus for some solar heat gain in winter months.
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Old 08-09-2015, 09:38 AM   #26
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The demolition is nearing it's end. Still some work to be done. But, a friend from work who is interested in doing his own bus in the future (though, a shorty, as he is a single guy) came to help out.

It was interesting to see how this bus is held together. There are these supports running the length of the bus that I hadn't seen before on anyone else's build.



In order to get the side panels out, I had to remove the windows and take out six screws holding the outer skin to the inner skin. I already had the chair rail screws out.



We suited up in 3M painter's suits, masks and goggles to bag up the insulation. Then as he took an old broom to the walls and ceiling, I came in behind him with a shop vac and got everything off the floor and still hanging on.




These window openings are roughly 24 by 28 inches.



Overall, I am feeling optimistic about the headroom. We are going to place some scrap wood underneath a piece of plywood to simulate the finished height of flooring and ceiling materials and see how we feel. The current headroom must be at least 6'1".

When I get time, I am going to try and edit that last post with the link to the album. I used google photos for these ones, I'd like to embed images. I know I like seeing posts with plenty of embedded images.
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Old 08-09-2015, 10:20 AM   #27
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The bus for us

Looks like you're going all out... That's a heck of a demo job!!

The build should be nice.

I have four wheel wells my two aft wells have a sink and portion of my bed over one and a closet over the other. My toilet is in front of my driver side well and full size shower in front of the other.ImageUploadedByTapatalk1439130135.112920.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1439130320.548170.jpg
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Old 08-09-2015, 10:54 AM   #28
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Looks like the bus is in great shape.
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Old 08-09-2015, 02:46 PM   #29
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Chassis: TC2000 FE
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Originally Posted by ii_amnt View Post
There are these supports running the length of the bus that I hadn't seen before on anyone else's build.
Those supports are standard on bluebird coachwork

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Looks like you're going all out... That's a heck of a demo job!!
That's not all out.

That demolition is standard on any bus build that is more than a slapped together pile of crap.

If you don't demo the inside, your bus will always stink, have condensation on the walls in cold, and unbearably hot in the summer heat. Also the fiberglass will keep grabbing and holding moisture, rusting away at the inside of your walls.

Nat
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Old 08-10-2015, 05:55 AM   #30
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Looks like the bus is in great shape.
It's been great so far, it's what helped sell the bus to me.

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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
Those supports are standard on bluebird coachwork
Show's how much attention to detail I have! The only downside will be if I go with polyiso board, then I will have to cut out channels to accommodate them.

The one thing I am not totally sure what to do with is the piece of sheet metal that seems to be holding the walls to the floor. The one that makes up the bottom half of the chair rail. I am going to want to at least cut off the ledge. I don't recall seeing anyone totally remove it, but I'd have to double check. I just want to be able to treat any rust hanging out in there. If it must stay, I will definitely add a layer of insulation over it. Maybe I could do a 3" polyiso board in the walls. I would use 2" boards to fit in that channel, then add 1" board to the inner side to help make it flush.
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