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Old 10-02-2015, 12:13 AM   #51
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One note on the driveshaft splines, make sure you mark the two pieces
of the drive shaft spline assembly so you reassemble them into the same
splines they came out of or you will change the phasing of the u-joints and
possibly the balance on the driveshaft. They are balanced as an assembly
by the manufacturer and will vibrate badly if not assembled correctly.
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Old 10-04-2015, 11:11 PM   #52
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Year: 1991
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charles_m View Post
Does your bus really have over a million miles on it?
I did the roof raise on the whole roof, I think it's the best way to go, and I put a big ass window in my buses forehead. Maybe it looks silly outside, but it kicks ass inside!
To the best of my knowledge it does have over a million. I do not know whether it's ever had it's engine swapped out. Apparently, the mechanic that sold it to the PO snatched it up when the county put it up for sale. He knew it to be one of the best body and engine of the fleet. Apparently, they contracted out the maintenance of the county school buses to him, so he knew it well. There was a few other vehicles on the guy's lot that had older international engines with over a million as well. But... I heard all of what I just typed second hand...

What I was trying to say is that doing a partial raise like the broccoli bus or journey (bailey's build) would look awfully silly on a dognose style bus. The flatnose can pull it off, though. I really don't mind the big forehead, and I think I will put a window up front, too- kind of like a third, eye, haha!

Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
Scaffolding breaks down to just the square-ish end frames and the cross bars. The end frames would be 5 or 6 feet tall and... I don't actually know... about the same width. If that doesn't fit the roof rack nicely on whatever you've got, then tie down a pair of 2x4 to the roof rack and put the scaffold frames on top of those.

Did you see the bunks aaronsb built on The Broccoli Bus? They sound similar to what you might be thinking of.
Thank you for reminding me of his thread. I hadn't realized I didn't make it all the way through yet. I really like his, they are very slim, I would like to achieve the same profile when stowed. I am no fabricator, though. I may have a go with some wood joinery- something that interests me, but I haven't really gotten into it. Maybe this will be my opportunity.

I have settled on buying some scaffolding and threaded jacks from home depot. It will only cost me about $190 and I can get the 31" tall jacks. I don't want to pay that much, but it really will come in handy even outside the raise.

So, now that I have made a decision, it has been continuously raining for the past week. Some of you may have heard that central SC is flooding. I am in one of the counties that has been hit the worst. It has rained at least 19 inches over the last three days. Luckily, I live on a slope. Bad for roof raises, but good in this situation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonpop View Post
One note on the driveshaft splines, make sure you mark the two pieces
of the drive shaft spline assembly so you reassemble them into the same
splines they came out of or you will change the phasing of the u-joints and
possibly the balance on the driveshaft. They are balanced as an assembly
by the manufacturer and will vibrate badly if not assembled correctly.
Thanks for the reminder! I haven't done driveline work like this, but have read about the importance of that.
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Old 10-05-2015, 12:58 AM   #53
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How about adding a taller windshield VS the big forehead?

As long as they are flat glass, any good glass shop can cut and fit taller pieces into the new opening, using a gasket that is sold by the foot, or gluing it onto the flange that used to hold the gasket.

Then you have a nice size view for looking up at the mountains while driving, or looking out the front of your bus from the standing position.

I feel the larger windshield makes the conversion look much more professional than the big forehead.

Nat
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Old 10-05-2015, 10:57 AM   #54
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Nat,

I totally get the appeal. I remember reading about your plans to do that in your build thread.

I intend to raise much like broccoli bus did in the rear, and done the same way in the front. This seems like the simplest way to achieve the full raise and keeps the heavy structural bits intact. I am not 100% sure on the differences between Bluebird and Carpenter's structural framework. But, it seems Carpenter used some fairly heavy members and lots of welding.

I drew up how I was originally going to raise the back, which would be cutting at the angle right below the rear windows. The amount of steel added and cutting to extend seems unnecessary.

I am not sure if I've mentioned it, but for the first five years living in my bus will be stationary 98% of the time. Though, we still have an itch to do some travelling with the bus once I finish school (going back under the grace of the federal government).

I'll go back and look where you cut in your front. Are you planning on welding in the new surface for your window seal to bond?
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Old 10-06-2015, 09:11 PM   #55
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I don't do well with computer renderings. Here are a few drawings of the rear bed structure and how it will sit, the front cap and how it will be raised and built up. Also, there are two interior prespectives. One of the 'living area' with the beds down and one of the kitchen, with the beds up. They are not perfect but help me think of the space as we start planning.

The water heater will be right behind the driver, in that little corner you can see, where the beds and kitchen cabinets meet. ~30 gal with two elements, one for electric, one for gas. It will sit in a ventilated compartment that is sealed off from the living space.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 20151005_002959.jpg (175.0 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg 20151005_003029.jpg (191.2 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg 20151006_103706.jpg (141.1 KB, 8 views)
File Type: jpg 20151006_103724.jpg (98.8 KB, 5 views)
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Old 10-06-2015, 11:28 PM   #56
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Wow, good job on your drawings.

I cut the windshield pillars on both sides at the half way point. Yes, I will be welding the 1/4 inch thick tubing extensions into the old pillars. Then I will add a new portion of lip for the windshield to glue to. That lip is called the pinch seam. Pinch seam will also be welded to the new metal.

Most things in a bus body should be riveted. However this is one place that needs to be welded.

Nat
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Old 12-25-2015, 06:52 PM   #57
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The wife found this website, floorplanner.com we found pretty useful for quickly shuffling objects around in the space.

We really didn't want to do this to the bed, but the amount of space saving that happens we found worth it. We will have 2 little girls roaming around, and they need the space.

Also, we have re-assessed the headroom. There is about 6'5" from floor to outer skin at the center. We placed some plywood on top of scrap wood to simulate the calculated headroom once flooring and insulation is done.

Based on this we have decided to not raise the roof. Time and money is the inhibiting factor. We have enough on our plate and feel confident in what the end product will be without the roof raise.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg floorplan.jpg (78.3 KB, 52 views)
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1991 International. DT360. Spicer 5-speed manual transmission. Work in progress; spray foam, wood stove, etc...
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Old 12-25-2015, 09:26 PM   #58
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How did you copy/paste that image? I'd love to show my design wifie and I have been working on for almost five years on our thread.....
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Old 12-26-2015, 09:06 AM   #59
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That website has an export option but I chose to just press the "print scrn" button on my keyboard and open MS paint and paste that screen capture then crop and save.
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1991 International. DT360. Spicer 5-speed manual transmission. Work in progress; spray foam, wood stove, etc...
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Old 12-26-2015, 10:59 AM   #60
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Thanks! I was trying to do something like that last night. Between culling all the junk out of our apartment and taking care of the wifie-do list I was a bit tired.
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