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Old 12-08-2011, 10:56 AM   #51
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Re: The Camel Conversion Project

wow! thats a clean engine!!
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Old 12-08-2011, 11:03 AM   #52
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Re: The Camel Conversion Project

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wow! thats a clean engine!!
My neighbor used to be a long-haul trucker and he gave me some advice: Clean the engine and keep it clean.

He kept his engine bay immaculate and would find notes on the driver's seat when he would get the vehicle serviced: "Thank you for having such a clean truck!" He also felt they would do a better job when working on it because they figured he was the kind of guy who might check the quality of their work after it was done.

I intend to follow my neighbor's advice.
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Old 12-08-2011, 11:17 AM   #53
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Re: The Camel Conversion Project

Quote:
keep some dry ice in a bottom corner, replenishing it every few days
I think you'll find that to keep everything cool the ice needs to be at the top, since cold travels down. Is dry ice available the places you go? I don't think there
has been any around here for years, although I haven't really looked.
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Old 12-08-2011, 11:19 AM   #54
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Re: The Camel Conversion Project

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After reading this thread, I'm inclined to set up an ice box rather than the full-sized refrigerator that came with the bookmobile. I figure I can build a cabinet and insulate the heck out of it, then keep some dry ice in a bottom corner, replenishing it every few days. The dry ice is very cold and should keep a supply of standard items cool in a well-insulated chest. The best part: It uses zero electricity.

Any thoughts on this idea?
I thiink it's a brilliant idea - of course, it's my thread
If you want to use the formula I gave there for calculating the the box size and insulation amount with dry ice
the latent heat of dry ice is about 246 btu/lb versus the 144 per pound of 'regular' ice.
A little arithmetic up front helps alot. Good to know when you start that you're using enough insulation for the box size to achieve your desired result, rather than just throwing a bunch of material at the problem and hoping it works out OK.

Tom
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Old 12-08-2011, 11:31 AM   #55
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Re: The Camel Conversion Project

Quote:
Originally Posted by somewhereinusa
Quote:
keep some dry ice in a bottom corner, replenishing it every few days
I think you'll find that to keep everything cool the ice needs to be at the top, since cold travels down. Is dry ice available the places you go? I don't think there
has been any around here for years, although I haven't really looked.
I figure the coldest air will pool at the bottom and I can keep the items that need it on a lower level with the items that can stand it a bit warmer on a higher level. With a top-opening door, the cold air won't just spill out when the box is opened, so it should maintain a temperature pretty well. This is why freezer chests are so efficient.

My local grocery (Publix chain) sells dry ice, and when the dry ice is unavailable, regular ice will suffice. I've read dry ice is widely available at grocery stores.
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Old 12-08-2011, 11:33 AM   #56
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Re: The Camel Conversion Project

Quote:
Originally Posted by wtd
Quote:
After reading this thread, I'm inclined to set up an ice box rather than the full-sized refrigerator that came with the bookmobile. I figure I can build a cabinet and insulate the heck out of it, then keep some dry ice in a bottom corner, replenishing it every few days. The dry ice is very cold and should keep a supply of standard items cool in a well-insulated chest. The best part: It uses zero electricity.

Any thoughts on this idea?
I thiink it's a brilliant idea - of course, it's my thread
If you want to use the formula I gave there for calculating the the box size and insulation amount with dry ice
the latent heat of dry ice is about 246 btu/lb versus the 144 per pound of 'regular' ice.
A little arithmetic up front helps alot. Good to know when you start that you're using enough insulation for the box size to achieve your desired result, rather than just throwing a bunch of material at the problem and hoping it works out OK.

Tom
I'll keep that in mind when (if) I start to build it. Thanks for planting the seed of the idea!
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Old 12-08-2011, 11:41 AM   #57
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Re: The Camel Conversion Project

Glad it helped.
Looking at your engine makes me want to buy a pressure washer ...

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Old 12-08-2011, 01:08 PM   #58
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Re: The Camel Conversion Project

Quote:
Originally Posted by wtd
Glad it helped.
Looking at your engine makes me want to buy a pressure washer ...

Tom
If you do, also invest in a full-body, waterproof coverall with a hood and a face shield. Trust me on this.
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Old 12-08-2011, 01:46 PM   #59
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Re: The Camel Conversion Project

I need to plug an unused hole in the firewall under the dash. It's 1-3/4" diameter and it looks like this: MOCAP LDPE Sheet Metal Hole Plugs.

Anybody know where I can buy one of these in a single pack? The online sources that I've found sell only huge packs of 25, 50, 100 or much more. I tried locally at Harbor Freight, NAPA, Carquest, AutoZone, etc.
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Old 12-08-2011, 02:14 PM   #60
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Re: The Camel Conversion Project

I've used these in various places around the bus, metal, not rubber, don't meet any bizzaro specs or anything that I know of but they work fine and are inexpensive -


Both came from Ace - the one on the left from the hardware 'drawers' they have a bunch of different sizes and as you can see just pop into the hole - probably not waterproof if that's a concern, but a little bit of RTV would fix that. Cost less than a buck.
The one on the right is just an 'extra hole' plug from the plumbing aisle. Cost a couple bucks, come in a coupla sizes, are usually installed in sinks and made waterproof with a bead of caulking.
If you want rubber, Ace would most likely have them, I know they have rubber 'corks'.

Tom
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