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Old 08-07-2006, 10:03 AM   #21
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the ideal solution would to make the little cabinet that you keep the cylinder in (ie: under the sink) vented to the outside. A cylinder that is in a cabinet that is vented to the outside isn't really in the living quarters anymore. That's how large oxygen cylinders are in all of our ambulances. Just remember that propane is heavier than air and the vent holes should be in the floor.
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Old 08-23-2006, 11:21 PM   #22
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I have two BBQ tanks (20lbs) stored inside our bus. They are in metal cabinets that are vented outside, with acess doors outside and they work great. If there is a leak (which there isn't) it will leak outside. I do however have a very pricey LP detector, as well as a CO2 detector near the tanks and all the gas appliances in case.

I think it's safer than outside the bus, a rogue rock or crash and they will puncture, however inside the bus they have the protection of the bus's frame. Although I do have a 300 litre tank hanging from under the bus that powers the engine, so...

-Richard
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Old 11-08-2006, 09:53 AM   #23
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Moveable stove

You CAN make the bus stove moveable!
Propane supplier-type places sell quick-disconnect fittings for propane systems.
Place the tank outside or in a well ventilated compartment that vents outside. Then run your permanent propane lines to the location of the stove INSIDE, and a branch running to where you want to mount it OUTSIDE. I did something similar for a friend; the RV stove was built into a box with good handles, and it could be moved in or out as desired.
There are flexible hoses in lengths up to 12 feet to accomodate this.

The stove was then hung with heavy-duty shelf brackets....one other advantage to this is that it's adjustable in height if needed.
So, again; the RV stove/oven was built into a nice ply box with handles for portability, and mounted using heavy-duty shelf brackets and standards. The propane was hooked up using quick-disconnect fittings.

Unplug from the inside line, lift out the stove and move outside. Hang it there, hook up, and you're good to go.
Kinda like having a 'summer kitchen', keeps the heat out of the bus.

Just look at some of the newer Pop-up trailers, and some of the other RVs with the external stovetop feature. You'll see what I mean.
If you have a Coleman-style propane camp stove, again, you can use shelving components and a propane line hooked to your system to do the same thing. Just make sure the correct regulators etc. are installed to prevent over-pressurizing the stove......

BTW, I came up with this idea 11 years ago, nice to see the multi-billion$$$ RV industry is catching up with some of our ideas
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Old 11-08-2006, 09:54 PM   #24
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Last thing I want to do is crawl under the bus to install tanks, call it age if you like...but I've decided to go a different route. I just got my tank structure in place last week, I put right in the side of the bus....





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Old 11-09-2006, 07:50 AM   #25
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Those supply hoses from the tanks to regulator look a little short!
You can get longer ones for less than $15 each (probably MUCH cheaper)at an RV dealer or through a catalog.
Just keep in mind that they are a 1/4 inch REVERSE flare where it screws into the brass connection on the regulator.

BTW, if you get an extra-long supply hose for the tank-to-regulator setup, you can place an extra tank on the ground when parked for a while; no need to place the tank up in the bottle rack that way. Saves lifting a heavy tank at an awkward angle.......
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Old 03-19-2010, 02:46 AM   #26
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Photos of the new paint are up

In the Gallery section, under the Lucinda gallery.

I worked with local graffiti artists to do a piece around the entire bus, with all sorts of Mexican revolution, labor, and women's history iconography. It's, um, spectacular. Matamuros is the name of the troop, there are three of them, and while they're now scattered bi-coastally, they hail from Seattle.

It's Montana (Spanish) paint, in case you wanted to know. Rattle cans.
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Old 03-20-2010, 07:03 AM   #27
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Re: The Lucinda Lowdown

Wow, that must have been a lot of work! Looks neat!
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Old 03-27-2010, 01:42 AM   #28
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Mural details

Emma--mural close ups now posted in the gallery...lots of them!
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Old 12-01-2010, 11:01 PM   #29
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Radiator and oil leak/black smoke questions...

For the mechanically inclined. I'll also post in Cummins mechanicals. I posted to SkoolieConversions, too. Looking for mechanical answers, and estimates on the damage to my wallet I'm about to incur.

Hi Skoolies,
First the fun: I took Lucinda (1981 BB AA FE) from Seattle to Nevada for her 5th Burning Man this year, as well as a couple weeks in Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming for summer fly-fishing. We made the West Yellowstone paper, what with her sweet murals and my standard poodle traveling companions...skoolie travel is awesome!

Now the backstory: she's an old bus and has been slowly but steadily leaking oil, and it's gotten worse. The last trip in September was the final straw (1 gallon down to Nevada, one back, 1500 miles total). She was also putting out some MAJOR clouds of black smoke (on the previous trip to Montana) when highway driving and letting off the accelerator (say, down a grade) and then stepping on it hard. I attributed it to low oil and new diesel fuel treatments. Maybe-it had somewhat cleared up with an oil add/change. By the middle of the Nevada trip we had to put cardboard under her anytime we stopped--she leaked a tablespoon in ten minutes or so of sitting. Once shut down and cool, though, no more leaking.

But wait, there's more! In the last 150 miles home, an unlabeled red light on the dash came on, with associated scary buzzer, for the first time in my ownership (5 years). It started coming on in the passes of I-5, particularly when going from slogging up to cresting and heading down. We thought it was likely the automatic transmission fluid. The dipstick is a bear to read, so I'm not clear we were perfectly correct in our assessments of levels (very low) but the light went off when we added two quarts. After 75 miles, it all happened again--light, buzzer, refill transmission fluid. We went through TWO GALLONS of automatic transmission fluid before we got home. About 75-90 miles was all we went before lights and buzzing!

Some additional info: the radiator has been (now) diagnosed (with a heat sensor) to be only moderately functional. 40% of it has some amount of blockage and is not heating/cooling the radiator fluid. Up until the last 50 miles of the trip, the engine temp (water) and oil temp gauges were reading fine. Hot uphill, but cooled off right away. The last bit of the trip, though, the oil temp went near redline zone, I don't recall the number but I think around 390. I was able to keep it low enough (below redline) to get home and it's been in the shop on their back burner ever since.

The oil is a leaking valve gasket, easier than expected. The tranny fluid problem, though, is a bit mysterious. Transmission shifts fine, and there are no signs of fluid leaks according to the mechanic. The theory is that the radiator is not working well enough to keep the tranny fluid cool, and it is vaporizing--this idea is supported by some amount of vapor leakage evidence in some seals or something.

So now the question(s) at hand:
The radiator is too old to rod out without damaging it, so I'm thinking of having it replaced. It's a little unclear but it seems like this is basically the only solution (or the band-aid solution of a transmission cooler). The question is, does this sound like the right thing to do, and what should I expect this to cost in rough figures? The mechanic happens to have an old "new" radiator from the same bus, but I don't know what he wants for it, nor a reasonable price. The old radiator is off (to fix the oil leak) so that part of the job is done.

The other question is about the amazing black clouds of smoke. They're not the normal cold-engine smoke, nor are they light gray, or blue. They're black, and full of soot. Enough to cover the back of my bus. Maybe the two problems are related, and I'm burning vaporized transmission fluid? The smoke clouds have mostly gone away, but I hate to not mention useful symptoms...

Ideas GREATLY appreciated. Will share the outcome of the mechanic visit as well.

Drive on,
Branden
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Old 12-02-2010, 09:46 PM   #30
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Re: The Lucinda Lowdown

You might want to try another mechanic's opinion. Sounds like you have a couple unrelated problems. First of all, I HIGHLY doubt tranny fluid is vaporizing in the radiator. These radiators are not priced like car radiators. They are VERY expensive. Make sure that radiator is bad before you replace it. Sometimes they can be re-cored which would be cheaper than a new one. I would be very interested in that "new" old radiator he has sitting around.

I would have another mechanic take a closer look at all the tranny lines and hoses and see if there is some evidence of a leak. It might only be severely leaking while you are driving and the pressure in the lines is higher than if the bus was just idling.

The heavy black smoke sounds to me like a bad injector or possible injector pump problem. Is the engine running rough?
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