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Old 04-18-2016, 03:57 PM   #141
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Swamp coolers work in DRY climates.. similar to the effect you have when you get out of the shower and instantly any air (even the hair dryer) seems to feel cold.. when water evaporates from your skin a mat, etc.. it MUST ABSORB HEAT.. (thermodynamics) that heat is absorbed fro mthe surroundings..

I was told swamp coolers got their name because when they are used heavily, the space in which is cooled feels cool and clammy.. if a unit is used when its too humid.. it ends up warm and clammy and "swampy".. they also can develop odors if not maintained properly..

Misting units like seen at patios in warm climates use a similar technique as swamp coolers.. for those that say misters are only used in "humid" climates like florida.. compare the difference.. yes that misted air feels good in florida, because despite the temperature that may be 95 degrees. wit ha dewpoint of 75 (feels quite oppressive).. you can theoretically mist that air down to a temperature of 75 (plus some addituonal cooling as the water itself may be cooler).. your body perceives that to be quite nice N cool compared to the 95..

now go to tuscon where its 120 and a dewpoint of 35.. those misters will make you nearly freeze despite that temperature.. oh and with a lot less water usage than in florida..

many swamp coolers are simply a platen that gets wetted and then air blows over it making that air because the water going into the air must absorb heat to become a gas.. thus cooling the air.. the ENERGY in the air is the same.. it just is a lower temperature even though its specific heat is higher.. you feel cooler..

mini splits are not swamp coolers nor do they operate on the same principle on the outside..

Mini splits are simply identical to central A/C systems, just instead of having ductwork.. all of the air is blown out right where the indoor unit is..

Mini splits CAN and ARE ducted.. (mine are..) unlike typical Large central A/C systems minisplits typically have variable speed compressors and are smaller capacity.. because of generally lack of ductwork and the variable speed compressor they are typically much more efficient than large A/C systems.. esp since they can be set up in zones or you only turn on the minisplits for the spaces in your home or business you are occupying...

Portable A/C units like mentioned in this thread. .are also a standard mechanical Air conditioner.. however they are contained in one package similar to a window unit.. unlike a window unit they dont need a large weight-supporting window to be operated. . the bulk and weight of the unit is inside the space with 1 or 2 hoses that fit in a special plate in which the window closes on the plate..

single-hose portable A/C units are good at temporary spot cooling however are quite inefficient in the fact that you are blowing hot-air out the window.. if you are exhausting air and not bringing any in.. then that air is being made up in the form of sucking HOT HUMID outside air in through the cracks and crevices of your home (or in this case.. bus)...

two-hose portable A/C units make up the deficiency of single-hose units by sucking in air from outside.. blowing it over the hot condenser and then exhausting that air... this increases efficiency because you are not sucking HOT AIR into your space so that it can be exhausted with your COOL AIR!. . you are bringing in the air, using it and exhausting it without disturbign the cool conditioned air in the space...


why is Humidity a nemesis to air-conditioners? just like when you evaporate water it must ABSORB heat (making the air cooler.. ala swamp cooler)... when you CONDENSE water on your cold evaporator (indoor) coils.. the EXACT AMOUNT of heat Must be EXPELLED as that gas turns to liquid water.. that heat is given off to the coils.. making them effectively warmer or making the compressor work harder to keep them cold... not to mention when that water goes down the drain it is cold.. lost-energy..
in areas which Lack significant humidity you dont expend energy condensing thatwater out of the air thus not using electricity..

some units like window units and portable units attempt to utilize that water and attempt to recover lost energy by slinging that water on the outdoor coil.. hoping to cool it down some and minimize the energy loss.. these units typically have a "slinger wheel" on the edge of their outdoor fan blades.. split-type systems do not sling-water on the coils....

hope this convoluted long post hopes to clear things up...

I'll measure the size on a couple of my Mini split A/C units when I get home..
-Christopher
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Old 04-18-2016, 08:18 PM   #142
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And now I'm educated. Thanks CK!!!
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Old 04-28-2016, 04:39 PM   #143
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First, wanted to thank everybody for all of the excellent HVAC input, I'll be referring back to it often.

I have two new topics, painting and registration/insurance.

Is it necessary to first prime the bus prior to repainting the traffic yellow? I'm reading up on auto painting and the typical priming options available (etching and epoxy) but I'm not clear if I absolutely must prime it to begin with and if so what to use, or if I don't have to prime it, how I should prep the yellow and what kind of paint to use. Anybody care to weigh in?

Just as an informational item, my insurance agent says I can mock my skoolie up very simply in order to qualify it as a basic RV to get it insured. That is, with the seats and walls out I can lay down an area rug, a couple of camping beds, camping sink, porta-potty and a couple of beanbag chairs and voila, you got yourself a basic RV.

Then, the DMV (Virginia), in their special infinite wisdom, essentially echo this saying I'll need to send them pics, receipts, and a couple of pieces of paperwork and they'll send out a local rep to inspect it. If it seems satisfactory then I'll get my plates.

My question is, does the forum have a feel for how these registrations typically go and if such a minimalist approach in the name of expediency will likely succeed? My story would be that it's a very basic fishing camp type of RV to take to my friend's river front lot on the Shenandoah (which is true enough). I definitely have the intention to build it out fully and comfortably with amenities but definitely like the idea of minimally "staging" it to get it insured and registered. Any thoughts?

As always, thanks in advance!
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Old 04-28-2016, 08:09 PM   #144
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jman6631 View Post
...

Just as an informational item, my insurance agent says I can mock my skoolie up very simply in order to qualify it as a basic RV to get it insured. That is, with the seats and walls out I can lay down an area rug, a couple of camping beds, camping sink, porta-potty and a couple of beanbag chairs and voila, you got yourself a basic RV.

Then, the DMV (Virginia), in their special infinite wisdom, essentially echo this saying I'll need to send them pics, receipts, and a couple of pieces of paperwork and they'll send out a local rep to inspect it. If it seems satisfactory then I'll get my plates.

My question is, does the forum have a feel for how these registrations typically go and if such a minimalist approach in the name of expediency will likely succeed? My story would be that it's a very basic fishing camp type of RV to take to my friend's river front lot on the Shenandoah (which is true enough). I definitely have the intention to build it out fully and comfortably with amenities but definitely like the idea of minimally "staging" it to get it insured and registered. Any thoughts?...
Your timing is excellent. Today I spoke with the Virginia DMV, the DMV Law Enforcement folks, and the DMV Branding Work Center (the folks who turn a bus title into a motorhome title).

The law says you must remove seats such that you plus passengers will be no more than ten people (I'll post the reference tomorrow when I retrieve the link), and that the vehicle must be designed for human living quarters. They do NOT define what constitutes living quarters.

I explained to the nice lady that I wanted to retitle as fast as I could, to get insurance and to take my minimally-converted RV on the road to determine what I could live with and what needed upgrading. I said, "There are 'Martha Stewart' living quarters and then there are..." She finished with "...Larry the Cable Guy living quarters!" She understood.

Evidently they aren't interested in how livable the living quarters are: the strong impression I got is that one wants to have in place SOMETHING to meet bedding, toilet, cooking, water, 110v, and heating needs, or enough of that to be a plausible RV.

The big reason for the inspection is to ensure that you aren't dealing with a stolen chassis or stolen parts to go on the chassis. They'll check the VIN, check the parts you put on, evidently merely tip the hat to your amenities, and be on their way.

And on an earlier call I verified with the DMV that removing the stop sign and flashy lights and blacking out the lettering would suffice: in Virginia you don't have to repaint the entire bus. It would be good to do so if one plans to ever go out-of-state, as some states get real excited about schoolbus yellow on a private vehicle. But the law reads 'Only a school bus may be that color, have the special safety gear, AND have 8" high black letters saying it's a school bus.' If you knock out one or two of those you've killed the AND structure and would not be violating the law to have a yellow bus with no signs or flashy lights.

AND if one is driving a bus (even a heavy one) for one's own personal purposes, such as recreation, one does not need a CDL in Virginia.
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Old 04-28-2016, 08:50 PM   #145
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THANKS Dapplecreek,

Your research is deeper than mine and very helpful. The one (minor) hang up I have is the 110. I don't have that and would rather not make a provision for it, at least not yet. Is it your understanding or interpretation that such hard wiring is required?

What about some battery powered push lights and some candles? I'm a reenactor and have a couple of nice 18c lanterns that work great. Who's to say that can't be my light source in a bus when it is in the field at reenactments?
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Old 04-28-2016, 09:19 PM   #146
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Yeah, you're a minimalist.

They only said lighting. I don't think there's any requirement that it's 110 volt. You have 12 volt light already, but you could class it up a little with some new led lights.

Now I'm visualizing some 18th century mural on the side of your bus.
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Old 04-28-2016, 09:33 PM   #147
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Originally Posted by Jman6631 View Post
THANKS Dapplecreek,

Your research is deeper than mine and very helpful. The one (minor) hang up I have is the 110. I don't have that and would rather not make a provision for it, at least not yet. Is it your understanding or interpretation that such hard wiring is required?

What about some battery powered push lights and some candles? I'm a reenactor and have a couple of nice 18c lanterns that work great. Who's to say that can't be my light source in a bus when it is in the field at reenactments?
The VA DMV says only "human living quarters" - which in my opinion includes 110v and internet. I would go your direction rather than sweat the 110 - I included that as an option which would support "this is an RV", not as a requirement. But a deep cycle battery ($90) and an inverter ($40 for tiny) would do that if you wanted 110.
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Old 04-28-2016, 10:49 PM   #148
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The ceiling lights in a bus can be turned on when the key is off, or mine can anyway. That means you could put something that looks like a real light on the 12 volt system. I think they want to be able to see you turn on a light. Probably no ohm meter involved. I could be wrong. It's happened before.
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Old 04-28-2016, 10:55 PM   #149
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With some of us living numerous states away, free advise is just rattling your cage anyway. Most states have reasonably similar rules. I think this state says you need four of six items or systems they say makes a RV and RV.

So non-human living quarters don't count? Whyyyy? My bus is designed around the needs of a ferril cat.
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Old 05-08-2016, 08:45 PM   #150
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Quick question, and an unfair one probably, but can anyone diagnose this starting issue from a distance?

It sounds like the starter (batteries are fine), does anyone concur?

Thanks in advance!

https://youtu.be/HURbYoOk4ck
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