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Old 10-25-2015, 11:59 PM   #11
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Location: Eustis FLORIDA
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Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
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Very nice, solid looking bus for sure.
The fiberglass in the lower part of mine just lifted right out, some required the shop vac.
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Old 10-26-2015, 07:09 AM   #12
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Thank you! Part of the issue is just getting a hold of it. It starts 2"-3" down and I can only pinch off it a little at a time. I don't want to leave it but I don't see removing the outer skin to get to it either (obviously I'm leaving the chair rail in place). I wish I could vac it out for sure!
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Old 10-26-2015, 07:42 AM   #13
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stick a tool or a small hand in there to get it out.
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Old 10-26-2015, 09:23 AM   #14
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Very clean indeed!
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Old 10-26-2015, 01:05 PM   #15
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Thanks Tango!

EastCoastCB: Exactly, I'll just have to go after it harder, like with a crowbar or breaker bar, something stout and thin enough. It'll come out for sure!
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Old 10-26-2015, 04:02 PM   #16
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Year: 92
Coachwork: Thomas Built
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we used a shop-vac too, of course ours is taller than us and weighs 100lbs or so that they use in factories. try to fashion a tube about an 1 1/2" wide by however long you want and duct tape it to the end of your shop vac. We had a long metal attatchment that i just pounded down to reach all they way and it got every last bit. you'll probably have to bust up the batting with a long metal rod first though, as it may be too clumpy to get sucked up.
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Old 11-05-2015, 10:18 AM   #17
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Thanks for the replies guys! I was able to get the bottom pieces of batt insulation out with a 1x2 and just leveraging it out. No bigs....

I've been reading as much as time allows, mostly the Millicent project, and I have some questions.

1) I haven't yet seen any references to using the interior ceiling panels for exterior skin or other places once it's removed. Mine are installed with screws so it "should" be relatively easy to take them out.

Is there any reason not to reuse them for skinning over the openings for windows I'll remove? What about using them for storage boxes under the bus, that kind of thing? I see talk about using plywood or aluminum or plastic RV panels and wondered why go through the hassle and cost if the ceiling panels are just as good.

2) Should vertical framing members I'll add for the roof raise be run inside the window pillars all the way to the floor deck for structural integrity? I see Millisent stopped his short but I thought another project drove them all the way down.

That's extra material and cost that may or may not be necessary? If it is I'll do it but if not I won't. Either way, there will be screw threads inside window pillars that were left over from hacking off the heads to remove the interior wall panels that may prevent me from doing so.

3) Do most folks run electrical conduit through the window pillars? Do you drill through them and run the conduit along inside the wall or put them elsewhere?

I know these are pretty basic questions for most on this great forum, but while I've been reading and researching I haven't see these covered yet and have been noting questions as I proceed.

As always, ANY response is appreciated!

BTW, I have all the interior wall panels and insulation off now. Not a huge milestone worth pics but worth mentioning nonetheless!
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Old 11-05-2015, 11:41 AM   #18
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Year: 1992
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Chassis: TC2000 FE
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Hat channel / support rib splices cant run all the way to the floor due to the chair rail. Chair rail is structural and must stay. I over lapped my splices one foot on each end.

Unless your raising from the floor up. In that case the outer skin at the floor height must be removed, as well as the chair rail rivets must be removed.

Do not drill large holes through the hat channels. You will destroy their structural integrity.

Many of us "Strap" the inside of the bus with 2x4's running horizontal, every 16 inches starting from the floor up. This gives us a proper thermal break from the metal shell, and a place to run electrical tubes and plumbing pipes.

Later in the build, the 2x4 strapping becomes the Only mounting point for interior things like cabinets, counters, furniture, ect. At no point should any interior fasteners pass into the outer metal shell. This is a thermal bridge that will cause condensation and water buildup / mold rot.

Detailed pics can be found here.

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/th...ime-10138.html

And here.

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/ar...rust-8870.html

Nat
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Old 11-15-2015, 08:02 AM   #19
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Thanks nat_ster, all very helpful, the learning continues! Hadn't thought of framing out with 2x4's like that but I definitely will.

I FINALLY had some skoolie time. All interior panels and insulation are removed and I was able to do a thorough cleaning of all the debris. I'm going to have to pause there because the roof raise prep is next and I don't want to open her up as we head into winter.

For now it will be some rust remediation above the wheel wells and then boning up on the three service manuals I have and going through the 100k mile bumper to bumper service interval which is a biggie.

For now here are the progress pics:

Right side...


Left side...


First section framing, to be removed as the raise starts with the second rib...


Full view of the ceiling which is in perfect shape...and by perfect I mean there is the leaking section that roached out the wheel wells that I'll have to fix...more on that a little later.
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Old 01-02-2016, 03:27 PM   #20
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Merry Christmas/Happy New Year, blahblahblah...I hope all on skoolie.net are well!

Things have gone quiet on my project, I got her as close to the roof raise as I'd like to with winter setting in. I did score a free 7' base cabinet (the perfect length) for my galley kitchen out of a horse barn, will need some cleaning up and some Kilz primer but it's going to work perfectly. I also found a one man natural felled lumber mill where I picked up some really nice, and cheap, ash for the countertop - four pieces 2"x9"x9' for twenty five clams - not bad! However, one step forward ALWAYS requires one step backwards, right?

The one thing I did take on was removing the rear heater and looping the hoses as close to the forward heater bulkhead as possible next to the driver's seat. I got myself all set up with clamps and towels for the inevitable spill and was very happy with my approach.

Then I proceeded with my approach and managed to cut the first hose too close to the #$%^ heater wall to be able to both clamp it off on the engine side AND install the elbow fitting - F-up #? now?!!

So here you see my predicament. First off, the patch hose I now have to use is about four times as long as expected and bends closed (large red arrow), so it's no good and I need to pick one up pre-bent.

Second, and much worse, is the pipe on the left which I cut first and in the wrong place. I have a bar clamp with two pieces of small scrap angle steel keeping it closed right now. I'm not quite sure how to proceed. If I release the clamp it will immediately gush coolant.

My plan right now, in the absence of any other, is to do just that. Having premade the replacement loop I would release the clamp and install the second elbow while the pipe is gushing coolant.

I know that sounds ridiculous because it is but I can't get a clamp further towards the heater compartment and I can't think of another way to proceed.

Any ideas?


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