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Old 07-07-2016, 07:38 PM   #201
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You're looking at approximately 30-35 4x8 panels for a 40' flat-nose (it really depends how much of the original window area you'll be insulating). Not sure what your ultimate use scenario is for Transcendence, but I'd recommend you also consider using polyiso panels, especially in the ceiling/roof. The extra 60% gain in R-value (R-13) may prove worthwhile. You could probably get away fine with R-8 in the walls/floor.
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:05 PM   #202
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Originally Posted by BusFiend View Post
You're looking at approximately 30-35 4x8 panels for a 40' flat-nose (it really depends how much of the original window area you'll be insulating). Not sure what your ultimate use scenario is for Transcendence, but I'd recommend you also consider using polyiso panels, especially in the ceiling/roof. The extra 60% gain in R-value (R-13) may prove worthwhile. You could probably get away fine with R-8 in the walls/floor.
I plan on living in it full-time for a very long time. I've done a roof raise and deleted pretty much all the windows.....Check out a couple links in my thread for my YouTube updates if you'd like to check it out. I'll definitely look into the polyiso for the roof. I definitely want this to be well insulated. Thanks for the info!
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:40 PM   #203
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Originally Posted by MuddaEarth View Post
I plan on living in it full-time for a very long time. I've done a roof raise and deleted pretty much all the windows.....Check out a couple links in my thread for my YouTube updates if you'd like to check it out. I'll definitely look into the polyiso for the roof. I definitely want this to be well insulated. Thanks for the info!
I've actually followed your entire awesome build here and on YT. I just couldn't remember if you planned on full-timing and in what climates. You're probably looking at 40 panels for your bus.

If you can afford the investment, spray foam insulation is really the way to go; much higher R-values, structural rigidity, vapor barrier, etc. Costs between professional installation and DIY kits are a wash. Save yourself the hassle, chemical exposure and clean-up by hiring a company to do it for you. Guess-timating a cost for your build between $2-3k. So, not cheap. But those who have done it say it's definitely worth it.

I'm sure others will chime in here.

Good luck!
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Old 07-07-2016, 09:03 PM   #204
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My memory is that some folks on this forum have reported getting professional spray foam quotes and perhaps jobs for ~$650-900. Don't take my word; see if you can turn them up. 30 panels x $15 is $450; which is the better bang for the buck I don't know but the two costs aren't worlds apart.
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Old 07-07-2016, 10:47 PM   #205
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Originally Posted by BusFiend View Post
I've actually followed your entire awesome build here and on YT. I just couldn't remember if you planned on full-timing and in what climates. You're probably looking at 40 panels for your bus.

If you can afford the investment, spray foam insulation is really the way to go; much higher R-values, structural rigidity, vapor barrier, etc. Costs between professional installation and DIY kits are a wash. Save yourself the hassle, chemical exposure and clean-up by hiring a company to do it for you. Guess-timating a cost for your build between $2-3k. So, not cheap. But those who have done it say it's definitely worth it.

I'm sure others will chime in here.

Good luck!
Thanks for following along!! I've posted pretty much this same question to some fb groups also. After talking to a couple folks...I'm definitely going to check into spray foam. I'm going to call around tomorrow and see if I can find a contractor around here that can do it and get some estimates.

Thanks everyone for the responses! I'll keep you up to date on what I find out.
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Old 07-08-2016, 12:12 AM   #206
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About a grillion of them.


I went with 1 and 2 inch boards. 2 inch first, then 1 inch for a 3 inch total on walls and ceiling. The floor got 2 inches and plywood. I faced the foil out on both sides where there was 3 inches.

The strapping boards were pivotal in aligning and holding in place with HVAC tape.

The envelope was completed with poly plastic sheeting held to the strapping boards with frp rivets, but otherwise allowed to float.

Things I learned:

Great stuff sucks, don't bother except for the occasional gap fill near the wheel wells.

Buy a hot knife, heck buy a few from harbor fright. Just tape the momentary button to on and rest it on something that won't set on fire.

Pave right over holes and cut them out after.

Get the thin mylar tape and the knife will cut thru it. Aluminum HVAC tape sucks for this purpose.

Use your knife to cut radius serrations through the boards to match the curve of the roof the best you can. Try to balance the number of cuts to the least possible.

You can use strips of foam like chinking in a log cabin.

The 2" boards fit between the chair rail inner wall and outer wall, it helps a lot with draft.

Carpet adhesive tape, the pressure kind not the heat kind, from home depot, works fantastic to bond the foam blocks together. Its got peel backing on both sides, and some thin reinforcement thread in the adhesive. Once applied its basically straight adhesive and a couple threads. It will gum up everything you cut it with, eventually. I use a new utility blade and slice it ever so gently and it cuts. Its really great at bonding.

I feel the foam block approach is superior to spray foam but there is more labor. When I picked some walls apart for a test, they were bone dry after rainstorms, snow, condensation, and general abuse of the environment for several months.

I think the slight air gap between the steel skin and the outside facing silvering on the foam is actually desirable, and tends to happen on the arc of the ceiling steel.

Whew long post. Look thru my project to get more foam ideas if you want.

Oh yea the only reason I picked polystyrene vs the fancier higher r rating foam was the cost difference. The higher r value would be nice but because of the way it is installed I think the finished r value is not much different for the same 3 inch thickness.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MuddaEarth View Post
I'm brain storming on different types of insulation to purchase for Transcendence. I originally was considering spray foam, but upon further research, I decided to go another route. I'm considering using 2" polystyrene rigid foam insulation with an R8 value. For those of you that have insulated this way.....How many sheets did it take to do ceiling, floor and walls? What are your thoughts on this?

Here's a link to what I'm thinking about......
https://www.menards.com/main/buildin...05025382820645
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Old 07-08-2016, 12:46 PM   #207
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What gauge steel are you using on the sides?

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
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Old 07-09-2016, 03:56 PM   #208
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsb View Post
About a grillion of them.


I went with 1 and 2 inch boards. 2 inch first, then 1 inch for a 3 inch total on walls and ceiling. The floor got 2 inches and plywood. I faced the foil out on both sides where there was 3 inches.

The strapping boards were pivotal in aligning and holding in place with HVAC tape.

The envelope was completed with poly plastic sheeting held to the strapping boards with frp rivets, but otherwise allowed to float.

Things I learned:

Great stuff sucks, don't bother except for the occasional gap fill near the wheel wells.

Buy a hot knife, heck buy a few from harbor fright. Just tape the momentary button to on and rest it on something that won't set on fire.

Pave right over holes and cut them out after.

Get the thin mylar tape and the knife will cut thru it. Aluminum HVAC tape sucks for this purpose.

Use your knife to cut radius serrations through the boards to match the curve of the roof the best you can. Try to balance the number of cuts to the least possible.

You can use strips of foam like chinking in a log cabin.

The 2" boards fit between the chair rail inner wall and outer wall, it helps a lot with draft.

Carpet adhesive tape, the pressure kind not the heat kind, from home depot, works fantastic to bond the foam blocks together. Its got peel backing on both sides, and some thin reinforcement thread in the adhesive. Once applied its basically straight adhesive and a couple threads. It will gum up everything you cut it with, eventually. I use a new utility blade and slice it ever so gently and it cuts. Its really great at bonding.

I feel the foam block approach is superior to spray foam but there is more labor. When I picked some walls apart for a test, they were bone dry after rainstorms, snow, condensation, and general abuse of the environment for several months.

I think the slight air gap between the steel skin and the outside facing silvering on the foam is actually desirable, and tends to happen on the arc of the ceiling steel.

Whew long post. Look thru my project to get more foam ideas if you want.

Oh yea the only reason I picked polystyrene vs the fancier higher r rating foam was the cost difference. The higher r value would be nice but because of the way it is installed I think the finished r value is not much different for the same 3 inch thickness.
Thanks for the lengthy post....Some great info there!! I'm still a bit undecided whether or not to use spray foam. I've heard so many different stories, good and bad....I just don't know what to do!

I've checked out your thread pretty extensively....thanks for posting good stuff and keep up the great work!
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Old 07-09-2016, 03:59 PM   #209
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What gauge steel are you using on the sides?

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
I used 20 gauge....If I had to do it again, I probably would have used something just a bit thicker. I was trying to keep weight down, but the panels are just a bit floppy. Once insulation is in though, it'll help stabilize it better.
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Old 07-09-2016, 04:01 PM   #210
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Ok guys and gals, people of all ages......I have just finished another update video. Grab a soda and some popcorn....this one is a bit lengthy....enjoy!
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