Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-24-2015, 12:18 PM   #21
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,939
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
I use a cordless electric shaver. No water needed, and it charges while driving my car.

(I live off grid with no electricity)

My wife even gave me a shave in bed once.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 05:17 PM   #22
Bus Nut
 
M1031A1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Katy, TX
Posts: 910
Year: 1989
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner ER
Engine: 3208 CAT/MT643 tranny
Rated Cap: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post

My wife even gave me a shave in bed once.

Nat

Talk about TMI!!!!!
M1031A1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 05:36 PM   #23
Site Team
 
bansil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MNT CITY TN
Posts: 4,985
hahahahahahahahah... ...hahahaha...HA! ;)
__________________
Our build La Tortuga
Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.
George S. Patton
bansil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 07:09 PM   #24
Almost There
 
maggiemae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: CO
Posts: 91
Year: 1975
Coachwork: Ward
Engine: Ford 391 V8
Rated Cap: 72
Oh boy.

So.. I spend most of the day driving around trying to find someone that sells metalbestos. I kept getting sent along, and ended up going to five different places before saying screw it, I'll go with something else.

What came with the stove is 1 and a half foot single wall going into t.w. 3 foot metalbestos.
I know I'll need an extension, and I can't find anything here. And I hate ordering stuff like that on the Internet. Too worried the order will be wrong or damaged.

So I talked to a stove guy who sold me metalfab stuff. I drew a picture of what it will be set up like with the stuff I purchased today.
image.jpg
But after I bought it, this other guy that worked there came in and was like... "I really don't think you're going to need all this. Just get single wall and to through the roof." I said I was worried about the metal burning, (like some of you had said), and he laughed and said that it won't burn, I'm not going to have a fire much over 500 degrees, and I could really get away with just single wall stove pipe, through a cut hole in the roof, and sealed with silicone(high heat). He said that the protectors that they put around combustibles in the ceiling of homes is the same material as my bus.

So now I'm worried that I just dropped 250 for no reason. The photos of wood burners in busses almost all just have single wall going straight through.

Justin just picked up some fire grade insullation from his work today, so we have that too he says it's called rock wool. (Kinda silly that justin works for a company that has an insullation side, and only today he went in to talk to them. Lol. Men.)

So, what do you guys have in your bus? Single wall all the way thru?
__________________
Cheers!
-Kelsey and Justin
Thewolfbus.com
maggiemae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 07:11 PM   #25
Almost There
 
maggiemae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: CO
Posts: 91
Year: 1975
Coachwork: Ward
Engine: Ford 391 V8
Rated Cap: 72
Oh boy.

So.. I spend most of the day driving around trying to find someone that sells metalbestos. I kept getting sent along, and ended up going to five different places before saying screw it, I'll go with something else.

What came with the stove is 1 and a half foot single wall going into t.w. 3 foot metalbestos.
I know I'll need an extension, and I can't find anything here. And I hate ordering stuff like that on the Internet. Too worried the order will be wrong or damaged.

So I talked to a stove guy who sold me metalfab stuff. I drew a picture of what it will be set up like with the stuff I purchased today.
Attachment 6736

But after I bought it, this other guy that worked there came in and was like... "I really don't think you're going to need all this. Just get single wall and to through the roof." I said I was worried about the metal burning, (like some of you had said), and he laughed and said that it won't burn, I'm not going to have a fire much over 500 degrees, and I could really get away with just single wall stove pipe, through a cut hole in the roof, and sealed with silicone(high heat). He said that the protectors that they put around combustibles in the ceiling of homes is the same material as my bus.

So now I'm worried that I just dropped 250 for no reason. The photos of wood burners in busses almost all just have single wall going straight through.

Justin just picked up some fire grade insullation from his work today, so we have that too he says it's called rock wool. (Kinda silly that justin works for a company that has an insullation side, and only today he went in to talk to them. Lol. Men.)

So, what do you guys have in your bus? Single wall all the way thru?
__________________
Cheers!
-Kelsey and Justin
Thewolfbus.com
maggiemae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 07:26 PM   #26
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,939
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Single wall pipe is dangerous and will radiate to much heat to the surrounding ceiling. Single wall pipe also burns out in as little as a few seasons.

How do you know if your fire will never get hotter than 500 degree's?

This is one spot you do not want to take a short cut.

What is your bus worth to you, how about your life?

Is $250 saved worth losing the bus, yourself or a loved ones life?

I have lived with a wood burning stove my whole life. Single wall pipe is just not worth using now that we have double wall with a air space. The double wall pipe here has a stainless steel, seamless inner pipe.

Stainless can take the heat of a chimney fire.

A single wall will get red hot, distort, pop the seam, and burn your place down, asphyxiating anyone inside.

The guy that you talked to never asked what stove you had, where it would be installed, what fuel you would use ect. He won't be around the stove, so what did he care. He really need to keep his mouth shut if he is not going to do his research first.

I use single wall pipe on my stove in the shed, but coal fires don't run away like wood fires. I also have a baffle in my stove, my stove is air tight and can smoother a fire to death if closed down completely. last there are no combustibles within 5 feet of the sides of the stove, and no combustibles in the ceiling at all. My shed is a steel can inside.

So, what is $250 worth to you?

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 07:40 PM   #27
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,939
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Double wall pipe should come off the stove to a foot from the ceiling.

A foot from the ceiling the pipe should change to the stainless steel insulated double wall pipe.

Don't try to use a metal roof jack, they don't fit on bus roofs worth a $hit. Use a silicone flexible one that's made for metal roofing. They are good to around 1000 degree's.
Mine is laying by my bus waiting, I will snap a pic of it.

Pics of a proper wood stove chimney install can also be found in my thread called: "$hit I do for money". The mobile home I re roofed got a new chimney at the same time.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 07:48 PM   #28
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 258
I don't know about single-wall burning out in a few seasons. Nat, I think you chucking coal nuggets into your stove may have a wee somethin' to do with that. Around here it tends to rust out (stainless has only become common very recently). I've never seen it burn out.

But why return the double-wall? Yes, you can probably run anything you want. But the insulating factor is about more than just safety. As I noted in my long post above, it also greatly increases the performance of the flue (you should get better draft out of a shorter flue) and reduces creosote buildup.

Not to patronize but just in case nobody told you - you do know that with a chimney you want the "crimp" end of the pipe going DOWN into the one below it, right? That is, point each piece in the direction that "seems wrong because smoke might get out that way". It won't do that - the draft will keep the smoke in the chimney. But setting each upper pipe to go "down into" the one below it forces creosote to drip back down to the stove to be burned right away (as opposed to dripping OUT of the flue pipe which is incredibly dangerous).

With double-wall the crimp is actually a nesting ring that seals really well. I'm just saying this for any single-wall bits you may happen to use.
taskswap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 08:03 PM   #29
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,939
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Before I changed my stove from a side discharge to a top discharge and added the baffle, the first 90 at the side of the stove would only last a season. The second pipe up would get changed every second season.

However, the stove was also shooting flame 3 feet out the short 8 foot chimney. There was also secondary combustion happening inside the pipe from the air leaks introducing more oxygen into the flue. The baffle changed all that.

This is the stove that heated my family home growing up. Dad changed many 90's on that stove. The stove never saw coal till I got it around 8 years ago.

The jack pine was much harder on the stove than the coal. It would burn out of control hot. Dad scared himself a few times with filling the house full of smoke and hot embers.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 11:54 PM   #30
Almost There
 
maggiemae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: CO
Posts: 91
Year: 1975
Coachwork: Ward
Engine: Ford 391 V8
Rated Cap: 72
Absolutely, this is something we really don't want to short cut on. This and electrical wiring.
I guess it just got to me when he said that it was going to be unnecessary to spend the extra on the triple wall pipe (after I already bought it from the other guy).
__________________
Cheers!
-Kelsey and Justin
Thewolfbus.com
maggiemae is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.