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Old 06-16-2015, 10:54 PM   #71
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Looks like you're having great fun creating your own unique place. Keep up the good work.
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Old 06-17-2015, 05:06 PM   #72
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Great job on the bus, love all the wood, I used lot's of it in my bus but stained it. Take time to sit in the bus and just look and ask your self questions about size and space, how would it look over here?
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Old 06-21-2015, 11:52 PM   #73
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We're just going to clear seal the ceiling (say that ten times fast, lol). Since we got the couch in we have been doing a lot of sitting

So we are in the plumbing and electrical phase... Yay!
I have run into troubles trying to find an electrician. Licensed electricians won't touch our bus... They say the liability is too high. *groan*

So I have taken to the good old Internet and the library to solve the problem myself. I do have an issue though... I designed the bus to have all the outlets on one side, the drivers side, where the shore power and batteries will be located. The one issue is the refrigerator will be on the other side of the bus.
I was hoping I could get some ideas on how you guys think I could run a wire from the right side to the left for a power outlet. Going thru the ceiling is not an option. I could run it around the front of the bus, but then I have to deal with how to hide it, and how to go around the front door and then under the windows. We can't wrap it from the back because of the wood stove that is close to the wall. Justin suggested putting it IN the subfloor, but that just doesn't seem safe. We are thinking that our only option is to go under the bus, and use a tube to protect it. Ideas?
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Old 06-22-2015, 12:14 AM   #74
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Thanks again for all the positive feedback guys, it really means a lot to me! Here's a drawing to explain what I just said about the electrical image.jpg
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Old 06-22-2015, 12:31 AM   #75
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Pansy electricians. They're just jealous!

Going straight across the bus sounds good for simplicity, keeping the cable short, etc. If the sub-floor is thick enough you could cut a groove into it and lay a 1/2" EMT conduit (the thin metal kind) in there, then pull Romex or individual strands of THHN through. Some would say that Romex with its plastic jacket does not belong inside a conduit; remove the outer jacket and use just the conductors. I can't really speak to that. Or you could lay "BX" armored cable in a groove -- it might have a smaller diameter than the EMT has.

If it must go under the floor that's not so bad either. You might be able to bend and wiggle a length of 1/2" PVC conduit enough to weave a single piece under the floor, between the ribs, and over the frame rails without any couplers. There exist "L bodies" (probably type LB is what you'd want) and "pull elbows" which could come in handy for bringing the ends of the conduit up through the floor with a much tighter corner than could be achieved simply by bending the pipe or using pre-formed elbows. Those are easily found both in cast metal and PVC material. For use under the bus PVC might be nice because it can be easily sealed to keep road spray out.
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Old 06-22-2015, 08:43 AM   #76
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There were many wires pulled under my bus when I got it that had been run through about 15' of old, reinforced garden hose. It had been there at least 20 years according to the guy I bought her from and was still in excellent shape. Tough, flexible and easy to thread...I just may re-use it.
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Old 06-22-2015, 10:32 AM   #77
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I've done exactly what Family wagon as suggested. I used 1" pvc pipe, couplings and LB's. It works really well. I start with a hole saw in bus where I want it. Make sure you are in between ribs though. Then attach a coulping on a short piece of 1 inch pipe. That will keep pipe form falling through the hole. Then you can go underneath bus and get a good marking on your pvc for the next fitting. Here is one I used for the power inverter. Its just a coupling on the inside + 1inch pipe + coupling on bottom side since its just going straight down to batteries. Have someone stand on the top side when you glue the bottom on.
20150622_100852 by Hvbuzz, on Flickr

Doing this makes it easy to go from one side of bus to the other. I have a run that runs from the front to back and across. I just used EMT clamps, tek screwed to the bus ribs to hold up the pvc pipe.

20150622_100713 by Hvbuzz, on Flickr

20150622_100735 by Hvbuzz, on Flickr

If your just running one romex, 1/2" pvc would work, like Family wagon said.
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Old 06-22-2015, 10:53 AM   #78
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Another idea is to run it behind the baseboard on that side of the bus? I milled the baseboard in my bus as I did not like what I found at the box store. If you can you will be able to cut out a grove for the wire to lay in at the floor level and nail it to the wall board just above the wire securing it. This way you will not have to cut more holes in the bus.
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Old 06-22-2015, 11:06 AM   #79
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Wow those are all excellent ideas!! I really love the photos,too!! Makes it much easier for me to imagine.

Hm, I will really have to do some sitting and thinking. I do really like that baseboard idea... But I get worried about the wire heating up, especially if it runs to a refrigerator.
Family wagon, why do you remove the outer coating from the wires within a conduit? Does that mean the ground will be exposed to the conduit then? Would that be risky if the conduit is metal?
Hmm, if the wires are under/in the floor, it would make them harder to change, if need be. Although a conduit just makes a tube and it would still be easy to thread wires through. Hmm.

Hvbuzz, off topic, but the tank in your last photo, which tank is that? We are wondering if we can get away with our black water tank not sitting directly under the toilet.
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Old 06-22-2015, 11:21 AM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maggiemae View Post
Hmm, if the wires are under/in the floor, it would make them harder to change, if need be. Although a conduit just makes a tube and it would still be easy to thread wires through.
Changing out old wires in conduit is a helluva lot easier than not in conduit. One of the tricks that military radio maintenance guys use when changing out antenna cable on old installations is to tie off the new cable to the old and pull the old cable out, pulling the new cable through the conduit. Of course, a little pulling grease makes it a little easier.
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