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Old 06-22-2015, 12:36 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by maggiemae View Post
Family wagon, why do you remove the outer coating from the wires within a conduit? Does that mean the ground will be exposed to the conduit then? Would that be risky if the conduit is metal?
The reason I'd read for removing the NM jacket and the paper, ie pulling only the two insulated and one bare conductors into the conduit, was self-heating. I haven't looked into it to convince myself whether it's really necessary or not. A single refrigerator is a fairly light load -- surely under 200 watts running, and probably closer to 100 watts -- so you probably don't need to worry about removing the jacket and paper.

Technically, in the case of metal conduit the conduit system should be securely connected to the ground wire. Accidental contact is only bad in that it should have been intentional contact instead.
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Old 06-22-2015, 12:53 PM   #82
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Maggiemae,
That is just my gray tank. The only thing on it, is the kitchen sink. I think you are better off trying to have your toilet emptying directly into the black. Not saying it couldn't be done, but you might end up with problems later on. 18 years ago, I lived in my little 24ft travel trailer for a year. I found out real quick about how rv toilets are alot different then household. You don't have the water volume as a household. I found out that you really do need to use rv toilet paper too! Household paper will clog up the black tank to the point it is all paper in there. That is a pain in the a$$ to get back out. I guess what I'm trying to say, if you did a run of 3" pipe to a black tank, I'm not sure it wouldn't plug up before it got to the tank, because of lack of water.
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Old 06-22-2015, 02:18 PM   #83
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Hi, love your build so far, I've seen this idea for a convertible sofa online as well, are you still happy with your choice, I'm wrestling with whether to build one of these or purchase a jack knife sofa?
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Old 06-24-2015, 02:34 AM   #84
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Ok. It just hit me. We need to be ready to LIVE in here in 38 days. Oh boy. There is still so much to be done.

Good point with the black water tank. It just doesn't fit if I were to put it directly onto the underside. I suppose I could drop it down a bit... I'll have to make a support for it or something.

The couch... We have yet to fully use it, but it was really easy to do, I recommend it! I love how easy it is to pull out and how the only hardware I needed was four hinges.

I worked on the countertops today, using some pine panels that we will cover in epoxy once it is sanded to perfection. I didn't want to buy huge vices so I made some using wood and angled nails that sucked the homemade vice tight. Worked pretty well!image.jpg
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Old 07-14-2015, 10:12 PM   #85
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(From our website


We have had three panels of beadboard-like paneling sitting in our garage for awhile, now. We got them on super-sale at Home depot, they were normally about $40 for a 4’x8′ sheet, and we got them for $9 each. We had selected them to use on the walls, and now we are finally installing them!

Before we could install them, we had to run wiring. I ended up running the wire around the bus(instead of under), for the refrigerator/wash machine. I threaded it under the hearth box we made(over the wheelwell). We also had to run a rail, right below the windows, even in depth to the metal railing that the seats used to sit on, so that the paneling would sit level against the wall. This was an interesting task, because I used recycled and warped 2×4’s and a table saw. I was sure to wear eye protection!

I then used a big drill bit, and drilled out about half of the depth of the newly made wooden rail for screws to sit in. I screwed the wood rail onto the wall, right under the windows, using the same wood to metal screws that we used on the ceiling!

Then we installed fiberglass insulation. Previously, I had used metal screws and a piece of cardboard (to act as a big washer) to place the insulation. This time, however, we just used duct tape.

After the insulation was in, it was finally time to place our paneling, Yay! We cut it to size, 31″ tall, and secured it to the bus wall. For securing it onto the top wooden rail, we used finishing/trim nails. We pre-drilled the holes, of course. We used plenty of nails for this, because they are small and will be easy to hide once we paint the walls.

To secure the wood panel to the bottom metal (former bus seat) rail, we sparingly used metal screws. These screws aren’t the prettiest, but they do the job, and will be painted over, too.
After I installed a few panels, I decided to work on the trim to see what the finished product would look like. I did this also because I wanted to know if there would be any problems securing the trim to the boards… and if so, I could change my approach to the wall panel installation. Fortunately and surprisingly, the trim pieces secured wonderfully to the wall panels! The nails we were using almost acted like a screw, joining the trim to the panel very nicely. Also, the fiberglass batting behind the wall panel created rigidity, because we really packed it in there.

For the trim, we are using the same pine planks that I love (and used for our couch)! They are just little 1×3 pine wood pieces. You can’t beat $1.80 for 8 feet of “trim”!! I also created a little railing/shelf below the windows, to help hide the wooden rail and the top of the wood paneling.

Then I put a piece of trim on the end of the ceiling panels, to help hide the uneven-ness (see our other post). It came out superb, I think. Again, securing it using the trim nails.

To finish the windows, we framed them with the same trim, this time only using one wood to metal screw (the same kind that we used in our ceiling).

We will still need to paint the walls and trim white. I usually like to paint BEFORE installing something, but we are in a bit of a time crunch, so I want to reserve painting until the very last minute, where we can paint everything all at once!
---------------------







It's been awhile since I last posted here... sorry guys! Just been in high gear getting this bus ready!




I got the electrical almost all done last week, except for a couple boxes... it was surprisingly easy (after researching it for weeks, lol). Just running 120 off 30 amp... no battery bank/ inverters, etc. for now. Later, we will set that up, but not right now... no time. We have one extra battery we picked up that we will use for the 12v water pump, but that's it for 12v.



Today we switched gears and are working more on the plumbing. The toilet is in, and we got the black water tank cleaned out (we pulled it with poop still in it.., had to use a 5 gallon bucket and run the waste inside to our house toilet). We dropped it down to clear some mechanical things in the way, and created "brackets" using punched steel. It's currently raining, so we are going to finish the toilet-to-tank connection tomorrow. The only drawback of dropping it down is that you can see it from the side of the bus, hanging under. Eventually we are going to put skirts on, but for now it looks just slightly trashy. oh well.



Still working on figuring out the stink stack. I figured all along we had to do it the tried and true way... through the roof. Thought maybe I could run it on the outside of the bus instead, going up. But again, that might not be to aesthetically appealing. We even have a 2" pvc stink stack ready to go... I just really HATE making holes in the roof. Justin thought we could use an air admittance valve directly on the tank, but my sense tells me that would leave the smell of rotting poop under the bus... yuk. Not to mention risking splashing or leaking if it gets too full. Anyone had experience with AAV's REPLACING the black/grey water tank vents? Ayah.. maybe we will invest in a composting toilet in the future. Why is human waste so difficult!?! LOL.


17 days till move in. Can you tell I'm getting a little bus-crazy? Not to mention.. the place that we had arranged to live since wayyyyy back before we bought the bus (in APRIL), fell through last week. All the RV parks are full ('tis the season), wont allow dogs, or won't allow our "old" bus. Here's to hoping that we find a spot to park, here in the next two weeks!!!
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Old 07-14-2015, 10:19 PM   #86
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Lookin' good guys. And I LOVE bead board paneling! Have the same thing in my bath at home. Nice feel to it.
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Old 07-15-2015, 02:02 AM   #87
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Lookin' good guys. And I LOVE bead board paneling! Have the same thing in my bath at home. Nice feel to it.

Thanks!! I love the feel of it too, I think I will like it more when we paint it white, though. We have wood on wood on wood on wood right now, lol.
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Old 07-15-2015, 12:18 PM   #88
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Anyone had experience with AAV's REPLACING the black/grey water tank vents?
I don't have experience with it, exactly.. but I think a close consideration of what an AAV is supposed to do will lead to the answer. It's supposed to admit air -- let air into the plumbing system. Not out. But when the system ends in a holding tank rather than a sewer or septic system, there needs to be an air path going both ways. Air must be vented out of the tank as water goes in, and air must be allowed into the tank as the tank is drained. There'll be air movement as temperatures change too. I don't think AAV is a good fit here.

Sounds like the "light at the end of the tunnel" leading to moving in and hitting the road is becoming brighter. That's exciting!
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Old 07-15-2015, 12:57 PM   #89
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I don't have experience with it, exactly.. but I think a close consideration of what an AAV is supposed to do will lead to the answer. It's supposed to admit air -- let air into the plumbing system. Not out. But when the system ends in a holding tank rather than a sewer or septic system, there needs to be an air path going both ways. Air must be vented out of the tank as water goes in, and air must be allowed into the tank as the tank is drained. There'll be air movement as temperatures change too. I don't think AAV is a good fit here.

Sounds like the "light at the end of the tunnel" leading to moving in and hitting the road is becoming brighter. That's exciting!

Ahh, makes sense. Didn't much look into it, because I figured it wouldn't fit the application anyways. Along the idea, however, I wonder if a carbon based "vent" would work as a solution to a small vent under the bus. Perhaps using fish tank filters, or even ones found in indoor growing operations. A simple Google search returned this: http://m.instructables.com/id/Activated-carbon-odor-killer-filter-for-RVs-and-b/

Might be worth a try... For science :P
If it doesn't work, I won't be at much of a loss. Activated carbon media is relatively inexpensive.
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Old 07-16-2015, 07:16 AM   #90
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Watching this closely as I do not plan a vent tube or any other opening in the roof. I am using a composting toilet and plan a two fan vent to the underside. I don't want air, bugs, flies, coming in when the fan is off. I also prefer something that might help kill the odors. I'll try your link. Thanks.
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