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Old 02-10-2016, 08:35 PM   #11
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Old 02-11-2016, 05:51 PM   #12
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What exactly is wrong with the engine fan?

I would think that you should be able to find a fan that would work at almost any truck wrecking yard. The fans that Gillig used weren't anything very special.

IIRC they are standard Horton fans. Some may have had viscous drives so the fan didn't turn all the time. But the fan itself was usually pretty basic.

Windmaster Metal Standard Fans | Horton Engine Cooling Solutions
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Old 02-11-2016, 10:40 PM   #13
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Or you could just go with electric fans.
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Old 02-12-2016, 11:09 AM   #14
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I am going with electric fans on my 4BT. A., to make room for all the other cooling crap I have to stuff in the buses narrow little nose...and B., I have been told it will save nearly 10 horsepower.

I am, however, going to use a two fan system instead of one. That way if one goes south, I will still have some measure of cooling. And these engines don't really need that much 90% of the time.

PS...the tranny will have it's own separate fan combined with some passive, radiant coolers.
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Old 02-12-2016, 05:51 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
I am going with electric fans on my 4BT. A., to make room for all the other cooling crap I have to stuff in the buses narrow little nose...and B., I have been told it will save nearly 10 horsepower.

I am, however, going to use a two fan system instead of one. That way if one goes south, I will still have some measure of cooling. And these engines don't really need that much 90% of the time.

PS...the tranny will have it's own separate fan combined with some passive, radiant coolers.
There is a big difference between cooling a 4BT up front and any engine in the rear. Moving air through a radiator at the back of the bus has been a continual engineering problem for every bus OEM that builds a rear engine bus.

It is very difficult to move air into a radiator at the back of a bus and then out the back of the bus in large quantities. Kenworth Pacific buses used a scoop on the roof to help increase air volume, an option that became available on Gillig buses after Gillig purchased the KW Pacific Bus division.

Most rear engine Gillig buses have a problem with overheating when it gets hot outside and you start to push the speed. I honestly do not know if electric fans can move enough volume to keep things cool. The fans on most Gillig rear engine buses have blades that are 8"-12" long and at least six or seven blades.

Again, depending on what is wrong with the fan it might be a relatively easy fix or it could end up being an expensive fix.

One problem with the fans is some people insist on running the belt really tight. This tends to wear the bearing out on the fan shaft. If that bearing goes out that is not going to be cheap or easy to fix.
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Old 02-13-2016, 01:27 AM   #16
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Roger the cooling issues on rear engined buses. It is an historic and ongoing problem. Getting adequate airflow at the rear still seems to be the bane of engineers. One of the few buses that seems to have overcome the problem were Flxibles. They had these enormous scoops that directed the airflow down and over the engine and rad. Very art deco in appearance but they seemed to have worked.


Probably not the most aerodynamic solution but hey...it did look pretty cool.
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Old 02-13-2016, 09:18 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post

Probably not the most aerodynamic solution but hey...it did look pretty cool.


Tango scores a perfect 10 drooling smileys for this pic!!!! Matching fleet of Flxibles!!!!! I even love the colors!!!!!! Are the keys in the ignition?
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Old 02-13-2016, 02:07 PM   #18
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I am computer challenged as far as adding pics but why not fender intake or hide it under the body where there is free airflow? Even something like a 4-6" piece of sheetmetal under the bus hung down to catch air and add one or two big duct registers with screen of course or several smaller ones that will introduce forced/fresh air into the compartmentwhile on the road? I have only looked at 1 rear engine bus and said hell no I ain't gonna be the mechanic so I bought a front engine bus that I could put my hands on
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Old 02-13-2016, 04:05 PM   #19
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Depends on the make & model. There are some RE's that are easier to access than the typical FE. See M1031A1's engine bay.
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Old 09-19-2017, 05:16 PM   #20
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We have made so much progress since our last update. 2.5ft roof raise, insulated and installed sub floors, now onto feaming the walls. We are going wood to metal with framing for house windows and french doors, our Tiny Beluga is going to be a Tiny Home Skoolie hybrid. Pics and more at Tiny Beluga Bus and we post a lot on Insragram @tinybelugabus
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