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Old 10-09-2016, 12:29 PM   #11
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Georgia
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Year: 1987
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Chassis: IH
Engine: IH 9 Liter
Rated Cap: 66 + driver
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
im thinking a 350 would handle that little 24 PASS superior fairly well.. finding a 366 in good shape these days and getting parts for it seems pricey... if it were a full size us id definitely not run a 350 in it.. but a shortie (5 or 6 row) superior id run an RV cammed 350 all day...
-Christopher
Mind you, GM still builds a version of the 366 to this day - the 6L engine commonly available in pickups (not sure if it's the same block, but it's my understanding it is).
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Old 10-09-2016, 12:49 PM   #12
Bus Geek
 
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Year: 1991
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Chassis: International S3800
Engine: DT360
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
I thought the 6.0 was built on the same technology as the Vortecs...

4.8 / 5.3 / 6.0 .. arent those all aluminum or are they iron block?

I just think for a short bus theres more expense and effort involved in trying to build and install a towanda style truck block than there is in just dropping a 350 in and being done... you'll get 150,000 miles out of a 350 easily which is probably more than this bus will see in 20 years unless they plan to run the wheels off of it..

-Christopher
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Old 10-09-2016, 08:25 PM   #13
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I have driven smaller buses with the small block.

Empty they were not bad. Put any passengers on board and they had no go.

Granted they had carbs and points instead of EFI and HEI which really helps drivability. But at the end of the day, they are still small blocks.

In regards to new engines, I think the 8.1L is the closest relative to the Tonawonda high head big block engines.
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Old 10-09-2016, 08:36 PM   #14
Bus Geek
 
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Year: 1991
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I know a small block isnt ideal... was just trying to think how to get the OP on the roasd the simplest..

I dont know what Block the 454 I had in my original bluebird was... obviously end of the day it was a big block vs a small block.. i did a mild build on it but never touch the bottom end so i have no idea what the bore and stroke was on it...

cam, intake, lifters, headers and such for a regular 454 all fit it...

I know in a 5 window bluebird it screamed after i did a few bolt ons

-Christopher
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Old 10-09-2016, 11:14 PM   #15
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I owned a 61 ford b600 bus a long time ago, 292 v8, had adequate power and torque. The stock carb on it was a 350 holley 2 barrel, every gas powered medium truck I ran into during my truck driving career had a 2 barrel carb so if you stay with a gas engine, use a 2 barrel carb, you will save gas and your engine will last longer
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Old 10-10-2016, 08:21 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kubla View Post
I owned a 61 ford b600 bus a long time ago, 292 v8, had adequate power and torque. The stock carb on it was a 350 holley 2 barrel, every gas powered medium truck I ran into during my truck driving career had a 2 barrel carb so if you stay with a gas engine, use a 2 barrel carb, you will save gas and your engine will last longer

if you spend a lot of time learning your driving habits you can tune a 4 barrell to be more efficient than a 2, and still have the extra Power when you need it.. Holley excluded.. I worked and worked to get a holley be efficient but its tough..

edelbrock I could tune down to a science that would run nicely... most of the big truck motors came with only 2 bbl as they were brute engines in which 2 large barrels are needed for good Low-end torque.. a 4 barrel fails miserably at the low end..

if runnign a bus with an AT545, a 4 barrel is perfect because the TQC stall speed is much higher thus allowing a V-8, even a smaller block to run up into its power band of RPM's when pushed..

I believe thats why AT545's never really were preferred in diesels because the stall speed runs up too high past the maximum torque of the motor..

-Christopher
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Old 10-10-2016, 02:19 PM   #17
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Year: 1996
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Chassis: 9 window conventional
Engine: International 466/ Allison 545
As said by others, this is a GMC V-6 not a chevy V-8 Thirsty heavy slugs, throw it away!

Just a thought, it would be far cheaper to find a modern wreck and transplant a newer GM LS engine. 4.8,5.3,6.0 or 6.2 they have far more power and reliability. The transmission is a lock-up 4 speed overdrive. Look for a 2wd pickup or G van. The salvage yards are full of them now. Do not be afraid of the fuel injection. Conversions are easy.
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Old 10-10-2016, 08:09 PM   #18
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Join Date: Oct 2016
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Thanks for all the information guys. I found a site which has lots of parts (body and engine) for this bus. It's called Classicparts.com. They even have disk brake conversions and rebuilt carbs. I think the way to go is to get the problem with the current engine diagnosed first before contemplating an engine swap. I looked on some GMC VIN decoding sites and could not decipher its VIN 3505 F10612D. I found a few VINs starting with '2505' but none of them ended in 'D'. I think this bus may be a 1965 registered in 1966.
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Old 10-10-2016, 08:21 PM   #19
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
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Year: 1991
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Chassis: International S3800
Engine: DT360
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
its common for the chassis to be built a year before the bus... if you happen to hit near a model year break it very well may have been a 1965 chassi and a 66 body... im not sure how that was handled that long ago..

I know when I looked up the components on my latest bus its chassis was built in spring 1999 including its engine.. and the bus was sold as a 2000.. my VIN chases down correctly however things may have been different long ago.. they may have used the chassis year code and not updated it for a later model bus..
-Christopher
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Old 10-10-2016, 09:51 PM   #20
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Honestly, if I had a vintage bus (regardless of make), I would be highly tempted to drop in a more modern engine and transmission. For a smaller bus, I'd snag a fuel injected/TBI small block GM like a 350 ... for a larger bus I'd consider a 5.9 Cummins or DT466 (if there was room for it). If I had plenty of room, I'd even move up to a larger diesel engine such as an L10 or M11 Cummins with a 10-speed behind it. At that point, I'd be considering axle swaps and air brake conversions ...
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