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Old 12-07-2017, 12:43 PM   #1
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Location: Tracy, CA atm
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Year: 1991
Coachwork: Crown Supercoach Series II
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC
6v92 Crown mystery knob

It might be super obvious or who knows, it might be obscure since this model had alternative fuel. Name the knob. No not me, in the pic.

There are more but this one worries me the most atm.IMG_20171207_102720(1).jpg

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Old 12-07-2017, 02:22 PM   #2
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Why do those buses never come with manuals?

Welcome to the site. The Crown experts will be along shortly.
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Old 12-07-2017, 02:48 PM   #3
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push it.
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Old 12-07-2017, 04:43 PM   #4
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You might look in the engine compartment and see if there's a a canister that looks like a propane torch cylinder. Some older Detroit's had a starting fluid canister with a button to activate it for cold weather starting. Or see if there's a glow plug in the intake never know.

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Old 12-07-2017, 08:14 PM   #5
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Most likely a starting aid. Yes could be for the starting fluid canister.

Another cold starting method although more rare but I did have one, that had a spark plug in the air chamber and a fuel injector that would spray fuel into the the engine for preheat. This did not spray into the cylinders as a normal fuel injector would but rather into the air space around the bottom of the cylinders where the intake air is fed.
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Old 12-07-2017, 11:31 PM   #6
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Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 632
Year: 1990
Coachwork: integral
Chassis: Crown Supercoach II (rear engine)
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC, DDEC 2, Jake brake, Allison HT740
Rated Cap: 37,400 lbs GVWR
I'm guessing your bus was never originally a methanol-engined bus, otherwise it would have had switches for the fuel cooler or fire suppression system in the two positions between the three start switches and the gauges. My Super II has the Quick Start ether injection system, but its push-switch is next to the ignition key switch up front. If you have a Quick Start system, there will be a small injector nozzle with a 1/4" MPT threaded into the driver's side (engine's right side) of the air horn between the turbo and the blower, between the cylinder banks. There will also be an orange ether bottle with a feed tube running to a temperature-controlled valve in the driver-side thermostat housing. Do you have that?

I'm curious what the extra wires to and from the 100-amp fuse are for? They are not Crown's original factory wiring, so who knows? Also, what's that ribbed aluminum housing on the right of the photo?

On my bus I put a toggle switch and lamp in the two spaces for the methanol switches, and they are for my small electric fuel pump that's for priming (6V92s don't self-prime) and plumbed between the Racor primary and the secondary fuel filters. If I ever get air in the fuel lines, I just turn on the pump for a minute or so, and instant engine start. Easy! I also changed from Crown's whacko three-switch rear start system to a much simpler two-switch arrangement, grounding the front junction box's ignition solenoid via a 50-foot length of 10AWG wire all the way back to the push-pull Ignition switch and then to a good ground near the engine. This way, if I push in that switch I cannot inadvertently start the engine from the front or back, useful if I'm working on something critical. I never understood why Crown used such a complicated three-switch arrangement for the rear start function. And when I moved my start batteries to the empty space between the air dryer and right rear wheels I also moved the Cole-Hersee battery master switch to the right side of the rear start panel - this saved many feet of the 4/0 battery cables for other use elsewhere! I now have a fuel pressure gauge, oil pressure gauge, ammeter and Racor primary fuel filter restriction gauge on the rear start panel, and I've put three new coolant temperature gauges (left bank, right bank and radiator out) on a new panel where the Cole-Hersee switch used to be. With eleven (soon to be fourteen) gauges up front and another nine in the engine room, I know exactly what's happening! So, lots of changes from original, all to make it easier for me.

John
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Old 12-07-2017, 11:38 PM   #7
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Location: Midwest
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Year: 2003
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: TC2000
Engine: 5.9L Cummins
Rated Cap: '00
push it.
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Old 12-08-2017, 12:05 AM   #8
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Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 632
Year: 1990
Coachwork: integral
Chassis: Crown Supercoach II (rear engine)
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC, DDEC 2, Jake brake, Allison HT740
Rated Cap: 37,400 lbs GVWR
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin97396 View Post
Why do those buses never come with manuals?

Welcome to the site. The Crown experts will be along shortly.
Every Crown came from the factory with its own unique Service Manual and Parts Catalog, a Driver's Manual, and full electrical schematics and wiring diagrams, plus specific information on any other custom-installed equipment (e.g. sanders, automatic chains, Webasto heaters, air conditioning, etc.). It's well worth you looking for them. Maybe the PO still has them? I can't imagine not having mine that have helped me immensely during my bus's renovation and conversion.

John
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Old 12-08-2017, 07:43 AM   #9
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Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Tracy, CA atm
Posts: 69
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Crown Supercoach Series II
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC
The bus has plates so today I will move it. This weekend I will add some jpegs of the pressurized bottles and and and anything to uncover this mystery.


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Old 12-08-2017, 08:12 PM   #10
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 632
Year: 1990
Coachwork: integral
Chassis: Crown Supercoach II (rear engine)
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC, DDEC 2, Jake brake, Allison HT740
Rated Cap: 37,400 lbs GVWR
Whether or not your bus originally had a methanol engine is easy to determine - look at the VIN plate above the driver's side window, and if the 2R-40N-552 model number has an M after the 552 it originally was methanol. If so, those two switch positions between the three rear start switches and the gauges are for the original methanol switches (fuel cooler and fire system, I think?), and if not the left mystery switch is an add-on, maybe by the school district? Methanol buses which were all subsequently repowered with diesel 6V92s, such as Ventura's and Rialto's, will still have the small engraved labels for their two original switches there.

John
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