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Old 05-03-2016, 08:39 PM   #1
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Accessory air line from main tank?

Was crawling around under the bus today and got to staring at the main pressure tank for the brake system. It has a half-inch female thread fitting midway up the tank wall that is plugged with a square-headed pipe plug.

So here is the question: any harm in removing that plug, threading-in a quality ball valve and putting a standard shop air coupler on the end?

My idea is to use the tank as an emergency compressed air source for tires, etc. Is this a common or acceptable configuration or should I leave it alone?
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Old 05-03-2016, 08:44 PM   #2
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My idea is to use the tank as an emergency compressed air source for tires, etc. Is this a common or acceptable configuration or should I leave it alone?
M-939 series 5 tons has an airchuck on an accessory fitting. So it shouldn't be a problem, although I'd use the accessory tank instead of the main tank
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Old 05-03-2016, 09:31 PM   #3
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M-939 series 5 tons has an airchuck on an accessory fitting. So it shouldn't be a problem, although I'd use the accessory tank instead of the main tank
Good input!

I only find a single air tank, under the drivers side just a foot or so aft of the driver. Any idea wherethe secondary tank is located on a 3800 International conventional 71 pax?
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:32 PM   #4
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It may have a divided tank. if it has 3 drain valves than it has 3 tanks in one.
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Old 05-04-2016, 06:57 AM   #5
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Bingo!

It does indeed have three drain valves on the single tank, so that solves yet another mystery.

Thanks to all for the help!
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Old 05-04-2016, 09:46 AM   #6
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Bingo!

It does indeed have three drain valves on the single tank, so that solves yet another mystery.

Thanks to all for the help!
But you still have to find out which section is which in the tank. Where is the location of the plug at? Wet side would be safest, secondary is so-so, but I would absolutely not run it on the primary. So figure out which section is which and go from there.
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Old 05-04-2016, 09:55 AM   #7
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Ouch. Good point. I was thinking the tank was simply baffled, and the air was shared between compartments and the drains were for draining each compartment, but apparently that is NOT the case.

The proposed location was at the end of the tank that produces almost nothing in the way of liquid, ie, the dry/primary end.

I'm going to go stare at the undersides of my bus for a bit. It would really be useful to have a compressed air source on-board, but not at the expense of stopping 30k lbs of metal!

There is also another lessen here for me: "Sorcerers Apprentice". We complete NOOBS buy these things and think we know what we are doing, but "shade tree" mechanics based on automobile experience may instill a false sense of security. The truth is, these are very different beasts, and the learning curve could be steep and even fatal.

Thanks for taking the time to Elmer me a bit. Its appreciated!
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Old 05-04-2016, 10:45 AM   #8
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Ouch. Good point. I was thinking the tank was simply baffled, and the air was shared between compartments and the drains were for draining each compartment, but apparently that is NOT the case.
Nope, each section is independent of one another internally and fed by a line on the outside.

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The proposed location was at the end of the tank that produces almost nothing in the way of liquid, ie, the dry/primary end.
IIRC all the ones that I've seen like that, the rearward tank was the primary side, with the secondary in the middle, and the wet side being about 1 foot long on the opposite end. I haven't seen a current bus have that style tank in a long time.

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I'm going to go stare at the undersides of my bus for a bit. It would really be useful to have a compressed air source on-board, but not at the expense of stopping 30k lbs of metal!
Good choice to look it all over, you might find something doing that from time to time. You can buy a brass T fitting at a parts store and T off of a connection that is already there if you so desire an air source. Just make sure it's not on the primary.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyCoyote View Post
There is also another lessen here for me: "Sorcerers Apprentice". We complete NOOBS buy these things and think we know what we are doing, but "shade tree" mechanics based on automobile experience may instill a false sense of security. The truth is, these are very different beasts, and the learning curve could be steep and even fatal.

Thanks for taking the time to Elmer me a bit. Its appreciated!
Not a problem, I always try and help when I can, where I feel comfortable. Light duty vehicles are pretty different compared to medium and even heavy duty stuff. Most people have minimal experience with a car, so they're completely out to lunch when it comes to a bus.
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