Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-08-2005, 10:57 AM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Anniston Alabama
Posts: 37
Send a message via Yahoo to phillip266
Air Idea

I was looking at my bus the air tank looked like it was prety good size i had a idea tell me if you think it will work.
I was looking at puting a tap so where on the tank or line near it
so that i could have air power on the road side like in case it had a Flat something i hope that dont happen but just in case i try to be ready for things in case thay do
anyone done this or is thire resions you cant do it
thanks any help i will be greatfull for
__________________
Cool things happen when Great Minds come togather :)
phillip266 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2005, 01:43 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
Steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Central Iowa
Posts: 1,838
Send a message via AIM to Steve
Yes there are many people have a tee in their air line for utilities.
__________________
View my 1972 Ward: Topic from the Build : The Picture Gallery
View my 1986 Blue Bird: Topic from the Build : The Picture Gallery
View my 1960 GMC: Topic from the Build : The Picture Gallery
Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2005, 04:30 PM   #3
Bus Geek
 
lapeer20m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: near flint michigan
Posts: 2,653
That's one of the big advantages to having air brakes. I just used an air cut off wheel powered my by skoolies air system the other day. I also use the air to open and close my front door, as well as the flaps that surround the jacuzzi.

One thing you'll notice is that the a/c on your bus doesn't produce much cfm, unless the engine is really revved up. My compressor spins at about half engine speed. Since the engine already idles about 600 rpm's, it takes a long time to create pressure at idle.

I've put air in skoolie tires, car tires, ran air tools and launched potato's from my pumatic potato launcher with the air supply from my bus.

It's been recomended that you install an inline filter to help keep any of the gunk from your air system from entering the air tools/lines.

You can easily install a "T" into one of your air tanks using standard pipe threaded connectors. Another advantage is that if your bus won't start, and you absolutely had to move it, you can use a compressed air supply to charge the brakes on your bus.
__________________
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes (who will watch the watchmen?)
lapeer20m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2005, 07:09 PM   #4
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New England
Posts: 1,009
Year: 1993
Coachwork: Ward Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/MT643
Rated Cap: 77
I plan to use a 12V ARB or Currie air compressor on my conversion (hydraulic brakes). Onboard compressed air is a wonderful thing.

With the stock compressor, I suggest a fast-idle switch to spin the engine to ~1400RPM for faster tank filling.
__________________
Jarlaxle
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Optimism is a mental disorder.
Jarlaxle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2005, 10:27 PM   #5
Bus Geek
 
lapeer20m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: near flint michigan
Posts: 2,653
I use an alluminum stick to press down on the accelerator for high idle mode.

shhhhhhhhhhh......Don't tell anybody, but I also use the same stick for "cruise control" while driving down the expressway. It's easily removed from the accelerator by tapping it with my foot, or by removing it with my hand.

The bus only cruises at a max speed of 57mph on flat ground, and that's on a good day! The throttle return spring is really stiff, my foot gets tired of pushing on the pedal after a half hour or so.
__________________
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes (who will watch the watchmen?)
lapeer20m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2005, 12:25 AM   #6
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New England
Posts: 1,009
Year: 1993
Coachwork: Ward Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/MT643
Rated Cap: 77
Dang...either you need an OD tranny, or you need a SERIOUS power upgrade! 57MPH around here will get you run over.
__________________
Jarlaxle
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Optimism is a mental disorder.
Jarlaxle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2005, 02:26 PM   #7
Skoolie
 
Firearm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 243
Send a message via ICQ to Firearm Send a message via AIM to Firearm
It's all in the gearing of the rear-end.
Firearm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2005, 08:32 PM   #8
Bus Geek
 
lapeer20m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: near flint michigan
Posts: 2,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firearm
It's all in the gearing of the rear-end.
Actually, i'm not convinced that the motor/trans has enough power to go any faster, even with a different rear end. A manual transmission would certianly help get more power to the road. The 6.6 liter ford is one of the wimpyest engines you can get in a skoolie, but it lasts and lasts.

How fast does your full size skoolie go?
__________________
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes (who will watch the watchmen?)
lapeer20m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2005, 10:17 PM   #9
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New England
Posts: 1,009
Year: 1993
Coachwork: Ward Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/MT643
Rated Cap: 77
I backed out just above 75.

If you have an AT545...well, that's your culprit right there.
__________________
Jarlaxle
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Optimism is a mental disorder.
Jarlaxle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2005, 08:53 PM   #10
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Anniston Alabama
Posts: 37
Send a message via Yahoo to phillip266
air cutoff tool

thats a great idea about the air cutoff tool one good thing about my new bus is that it hit 120 pis in the tanks quick in like 3 min from start up max the compreser was rebuilt at the same time as the motor and with only 20k miles on it should laste me a long while.
__________________
Cool things happen when Great Minds come togather :)
phillip266 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2005, 09:18 PM   #11
Bus Geek
 
lapeer20m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: near flint michigan
Posts: 2,653
a cheap although rather labor intensive idea for those that do not have air brakes: You could go to the scrap yard and buy a compressor from a truck or bus that had air. It would be simple enough to fabricate a bracket to mount the compressor to your engine. My bus has one or two extra pulleys for accessories, hopefully you'rs is the same.

The most difficult part of the puzzle is the fact that most compressors require full pressure oil lubrication, and engine coolant to keep itself from overheating. The compressor utilizes oil and coolant from the engine. It's not too complicated if you're realatively handy.

I bought a compressor in perfect working order for $10 bucks.

Then you can run air tools or whatever you want.
*note: I'm not suggesting changing your brakes from hydrolic to air.
__________________
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes (who will watch the watchmen?)
lapeer20m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2005, 09:37 PM   #12
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Anniston Alabama
Posts: 37
Send a message via Yahoo to phillip266
Air front door?

one thing that got me thinking is what you sad about front door how did you rig that up?
was also woundering does your air bleed down when your bus has been off for a few hours like say the next morning after a trip resion i ask is mine does.
__________________
Cool things happen when Great Minds come togather :)
phillip266 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2005, 10:11 PM   #13
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New England
Posts: 1,009
Year: 1993
Coachwork: Ward Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/MT643
Rated Cap: 77
Quote:
a cheap although rather labor intensive idea for those that do not have air brakes: You could go to the scrap yard and buy a compressor from a truck or bus that had air. It would be simple enough to fabricate a bracket to mount the compressor to your engine. My bus has one or two extra pulleys for accessories, hopefully you'rs is the same.
An easier way would be with an electric compressor. Currie & ARB (also sold as Old Man Emu) make reliable, rugged, continuous-duty 150psi compressors that will (with a tank) run air tools. I'm planning a Currie compressor.

These are durable enough that the military uses them.
__________________
Jarlaxle
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Optimism is a mental disorder.
Jarlaxle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2005, 08:29 PM   #14
Bus Geek
 
lapeer20m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: near flint michigan
Posts: 2,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarlaxle
Quote:

An easier way would be with an electric compressor. Currie & ARB (also sold as Old Man Emu)
EAsier yes, cheaper...NO.

Anyhow...Yes, the air pressure in my bus is pretty much gone in 24 hours or less. That's normal with most vehicles with air brakes. How fast is too fast to be loosing air when parked? That's a discussion for another topic. Even new trucks loose most of their air in a day. Some vehicles keep air for a week or longer, it just depends.

The front door on my bus was pretty simple to rig up. Basically, i replaced the stock bar that opens the door with a pair of air cylinders i got for free from some UAW employee. I isolated the air circuit for the door with a check valve that allows air from the bus system to feed the door, but the air from the door cannot leak back into the bus system. Then i installed a cheap 12 volt air compressor (less than 20 bucks) and a pressure switch that will keep the door system up to pressure and thus keep the frond door secured with a minimal amount of electricity. The compressor runs for a few seconds every 4 or 5 minutes. I turn the compressor off if the bus will be parked for more than a week to keep from draining the battery. Where i live, we dont' even lock our house doors, so leaving the bus unsecured at home is not a big deal. I conected the air cylinders to some electric solenoid valves that are operated with a remote keyless entry setup. I use the remotely operated door for the impression it makes more than I do for security.
__________________
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes (who will watch the watchmen?)
lapeer20m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2005, 05:55 PM   #15
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Winnemucca, NV/Reno NV
Posts: 181
Year: 2003
Coachwork: 2003 Thomas E-350 shorty
Chassis: E350
Engine: 7.3 Powerstroke
Rated Cap: 24
On board air

Another alternative is to use an Air Conditioning compressor- the piston types found in many pick-ups (I think they're called Worthington??) work great. Filter on the intake, pressure to a tank, add a pressure regulated on-off switch (my 120 volt version works fine), a relief valve and you're in business. Just check the oil level periodically- I believe they are an oil in sump type, but some may also rely on lubricity of the original freon. The GM rotary style compressors fry from lack of lubrication too easily- I think they expel the oil with the compressed air. This set-up is is a staple with the serious 4x4 crowd.
__________________
If it isn't grown, it has to be mined
http://weathersticker.wunderground.c...Winnemucca.gif
elkoskoolie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2005, 11:04 PM   #16
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New England
Posts: 1,009
Year: 1993
Coachwork: Ward Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/MT643
Rated Cap: 77
An A/C compressor can be converted (I used one from a Wagoneer on my old Jeep J-20), but won't hold up to long-term, continuous use pumping air. I considered that for my bus, but will go with a 12V compressor instead.
__________________
Jarlaxle
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Optimism is a mental disorder.
Jarlaxle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2005, 11:42 PM   #17
Bus Geek
 
lapeer20m's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: near flint michigan
Posts: 2,653
a/c compressors are very impressive indeed when it comes to the volume of air they generate, but as you said, they don't hold up long term.

I've been told the reason is that lubrication for the compressor comes from the freon under normal circumstances. Perhaps an oil supply that could drip into the inlet would help...i don't know.
__________________
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes (who will watch the watchmen?)
lapeer20m is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I need help? Any idea shortbusshorty Titles, Insurance, Registration and Money Matters 1 12-30-2011 05:13 AM
Anyone have an idea of value for BB All American? phillbus914 Conversion General Discussions 13 03-27-2009 01:01 AM
Idea of my next conversion bikevision Skoolie Conversion Projects 1 01-21-2009 01:08 PM
New to the bus conversion idea KC10Chief Everything Else | General Skoolie Discussions 13 05-07-2008 09:32 AM
Skoolie Idea bgrimm05 Conversion General Discussions 25 10-23-2007 06:45 PM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×