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Old 03-14-2016, 07:20 PM   #1
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Air Suspension For Leveling

I have rear air suspension and would like to get your thoughts on individually connecting to each airbag So when parked I can manually adjust them to correct any leveling issues we may have.

I will either tap into the existing air system and put in individual controls for each bag. Or put in an additional compressor and tank system (connected to house batteries) then tie that into each bag individually as well as the door.

Does anyone see any issues with using the airbags to level the bus when parked? in advance.
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Old 03-14-2016, 07:34 PM   #2
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There are off the shelf systems designed to do just what you are describing. I believe the only tricky part for a DIY might be getting back to a properly equalized balance for on road use. As I recall, the systems I read about have two modes. One for road equalization with balanced controls, and another circuit that allows for extreme differences at each wheel.

Let us know how it goes. Just wish I had room down below for such a nicety.
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Old 03-14-2016, 07:56 PM   #3
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Try hooking up with some low-riders. They run hydraulics to all four corners.
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Old 03-14-2016, 08:46 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
There are off the shelf systems designed to do just what you are describing. I believe the only tricky part for a DIY might be getting back to a properly equalized balance for on road use. As I recall, the systems I read about have two modes. One for road equalization with balanced controls, and another circuit that allows for extreme differences at each wheel.

Let us know how it goes. Just wish I had room down below for such a nicety.
Cool, will have to take a look at those. I figure since I have them, might as well use them.

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Originally Posted by CaptSquid View Post
Try hooking up with some low-riders. They run hydraulics to all four corners.
I didn't think of that. Going to check some forums now. Thanks.
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Old 03-14-2016, 11:34 PM   #5
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The load on a motor coach stays fairly constant unlike a semi, so a simple valve and gauge for each airbag would let you set the pressure (and ride height) wherever you like.
When parked you could use that system for leveling.
I think this is fairly common on bus conversions.
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:48 AM   #6
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Personally, I would not waste my time figuring a way in which to use the air suspension to level things out.

In the first place, the bus will need to be relatively level at the start--there isn't that much up over normal ride height you can go.

In the second place, very few buses have air systems that don't leak down. Some will do it in less than an hour. Some will take several days. Unless you have an additional way in which to recharge the system you will find yourself on the bottom sooner or later.

And lastly, whatever sort of movement you have when you are going down the road will continue when you are parked.

The best sort of leveling system takes some of the load off of the suspension so you have the frame directly in contact with the ground. That way you won't have much of the wiggle of the suspension and tires transmitted into your "house" when you are parked.
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Old 03-15-2016, 11:03 AM   #7
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If I am remembering right (which rarely happens) the high end coach arrangement used the airbags only to achieve level, then drop down locking leg supports carried the weight. As noted, air systems are notorious for leaking.
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Old 03-17-2016, 11:36 AM   #8
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If I end up doing it I would have an alternate compressor and tank that ran off of the house batteries or geni. That way I would also be able to use that system for the air door as well.

It will all come down to how hard will it be to set up. The bags do hold air well for about a week without any additional air added.

Also will be taking a look at other leveling systems as well but this would be so simple if I can get it to work properly.
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