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Old 04-19-2015, 08:04 PM   #11
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No worries Dave!

Just emphasizing extra volume is good with big air hogs ;) and Evan train horns need a little extra ...lol
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Old 04-20-2015, 01:17 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
I'm about to do the same thing for the opposite reason. I need to fill the tanks with a house compressor to release the air brakes.
I had assumed.. perhaps too generously.. that it would be common for air-braked vehicles to have a shop air connection standard for just this purpose. Mine does, but of course there's no telling whether it is original or not! It's a male fitting hanging down so I can push the line from the electric compressor right onto it.

I also assembled a female-to-female gender changing adapter so that I can plug in the male end of a hose and draw air off the bus (it was easier than plumbing in a tee, and I don't have to worry about the female piece getting road grit inside and ruining the seal). It's good enough for re-inflating that one tire that leaks air, and for running a 1/2" air impact wrench on the side of the highway when I had to go replace a shredded ST trailer tire. For little "emergency" jobs it's more convenient than packing up a generator and electric compressor.

Of course Nat you'll already be aware of this, but to others: if you're going to plumb in a fitting for filling the air system from an external compressor, remember that there are two sections to the air system (primary and secondary) and make your tap upstream so that from one hookup you can fill both sides of the air system. Otherwise it'll be kind of like patting yourself on the back after hooking up the water to a new toilet in the house.... and then realizing you accidentally plumbed HOT water to the toilet.
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Old 04-20-2015, 06:27 AM   #13
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remember that there are two sections to the air system (primary and fill both sides of the air system. Otherwise it'll be kind of like patting yourself on the back after hooking up the water to a new toilet in the secondary) and make your tap upstream so that from one hookup you can house.... and then realizing you accidentally plumbed HOT water to the toilet.
ok you have my attention. i have 2 tanks,do they all have 2? i have a air door, when i remove that door can i hook up my air chuck to the door control valve line? i noticed 2 needles in my air gauge, is that for the primary and secondary? thanks
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Old 04-20-2015, 11:39 AM   #14
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Actually you should have 3 systems, One is the wet tank that comes directly from the compressor or air dryer. The other two are primary and secondary air systems that supply brake pressure to their corresponding axle(s). Most of the braking force is created by the rear axles and primary side. So when mounting accessories or a coupler, most run it off either the wet tank(it isn't really all that wet) or the secondary system. If you put the quick connect on the wet tank it will fill both tanks simultaneously, so there would be no need for two separate couplers.

You might actually only have one tank, but that tank is divided internally into the separate systems. You could also have several tanks also depending on the number of axles, braking system size, vehicle usage, etc.
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Old 04-20-2015, 11:43 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by superdave View Post
ok you have my attention. i have 2 tanks,do they all have 2? i have a air door, when i remove that door can i hook up my air chuck to the door control valve line? i noticed 2 needles in my air gauge, is that for the primary and secondary? thanks
All don't necessarily have two tanks, just two systems -- there may be more than two tanks. I haven't made a point of counting them, but from memory it seems like mine might have 5 tanks..? This might be because my bus has ABS brakes, and I can imagine an ABS stop is going to consume a large volume of air quickly so they'd install extra tanks as reserve for that.

I guess you could hook up to the door control valve line, but it's probably just 1/4" tube, which is going to limit the air flow (compared to connecting to a shorter and/or larger diameter point). It shouldn't be too hard to start at the compressor on the engine and follow the tube past the drier to the first tank. The tanks are often built with a number of bungs around them, and it might be that yours has an extra where you can simply remove the plug and connect your own stuff. If not, there's always the tee option.

Oh.. yes, the two needles in your air pressure gauge are usually green for the primary system and orange for the secondary. But don't ask me which systems do which part of the braking -- I don't know!
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Old 04-20-2015, 07:02 PM   #16
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That's what I did on both my bus and the dump truck I was working on the other day. I just followed the line from the compressor to the tank, and added a T right where the air go's into the tank.

I'm also adding a York 210 to my system. It will be a back up, and more CFM when needed. Best part is the York has a clutch, so it won't use engine power when not needed.

Nat
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