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Old 08-02-2016, 07:09 PM   #1
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Arched cuts, how does everyone do them?

So I've been hunting around, and can't find a definitive answer. How does one measure and cut the arched shape of the bus ceiling for a wall? I've seen a few methods, but can't find instructions on how to measure for the cut.

Someone on here, I can't remember who, used a piece of cardboard as a "stencil", this is what I'm leaning towards so far because I'm not a very skilled carpenter. But idk where to find such a big piece of cardboard
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Old 08-02-2016, 08:00 PM   #2
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So I've been hunting around, and can't find a definitive answer. How does one measure and cut the arched shape of the bus ceiling for a wall? I've seen a few methods, but can't find instructions on how to measure for the cut.

Someone on here, I can't remember who, used a piece of cardboard as a "stencil", this is what I'm leaning towards so far because I'm not a very skilled carpenter. But idk where to find such a big piece of cardboard

I've heard a bow & string will help too...
Haven't tried either, YET


Someone should post up a "to scale" pdf that'll get ya close
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Old 08-02-2016, 08:52 PM   #3
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Behind the big-box stores that sell appliances, you will find a plethora of cardboard in various sizes. Asking inside the store will normally nab you all you need.

The radius doesn't have to be perfect, just close. Use flex trim to clean the look up.
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Old 08-02-2016, 09:01 PM   #4
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Behind the big-box stores that sell appliances, you will find a plethora of cardboard in various sizes. Asking inside the store will normally nab you all you need.

The radius doesn't have to be perfect, just close. Use flex trim to clean the look up.
That's what I've been thinking, when the time comes.
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Old 08-02-2016, 09:17 PM   #5
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I used a pencil and some cardboard to scribe my curved cuts.

First, tape a pencil to a block of wood. The wood spaces the pencil out from the surface and gives you a better grip on the pencil. Then cut a piece of cardboard to the rough shape of the curve. You want your cut imperfections to be less than the thickness of the pencil/wood marker thingy. Then hold the cardboard up to the surface (wall, ceiling, whatever), hold the marker up to the surface with the wood block against the surface, then scribe the line keeping the wood block flat against the surface.

Now cut out your cardboard template and use it to transfer the shape. A belt sander is useful for touching up your curves.

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Old 08-02-2016, 09:39 PM   #6
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My air door box (that I'm going to pull down and build a shelf/bin in) already has my curves that I'll transfer to graph paper. I'll post a copy of graph here


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Old 08-02-2016, 09:40 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by roach711 View Post
I used a pencil and some cardboard to scribe my curved cuts.

First, tape a pencil to a block of wood. The wood spaces the pencil out from the surface and gives you a better grip on the pencil. Then cut a piece of cardboard to the rough shape of the curve. You want your cut imperfections to be less than the thickness of the pencil/wood marker thingy. Then hold the cardboard up to the surface (wall, ceiling, whatever), hold the marker up to the surface with the wood block against the surface, then scribe the line keeping the wood block flat against the surface.

Now cut out your cardboard template and use it to transfer the shape. A belt sander is useful for touching up your curves.

My friend, you are a genius.

J
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Old 08-02-2016, 09:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roach711 View Post
I used a pencil and some cardboard to scribe my curved cuts.

First, tape a pencil to a block of wood. The wood spaces the pencil out from the surface and gives you a better grip on the pencil. Then cut a piece of cardboard to the rough shape of the curve. You want your cut imperfections to be less than the thickness of the pencil/wood marker thingy. Then hold the cardboard up to the surface (wall, ceiling, whatever), hold the marker up to the surface with the wood block against the surface, then scribe the line keeping the wood block flat against the surface.

Now cut out your cardboard template and use it to transfer the shape. A belt sander is useful for touching up your curves.

Excellent idea!
Much better than the trial and error method I used.
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Old 08-02-2016, 09:48 PM   #9
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My friend, you are a genius.

J
Thanx! I wish I could take credit for the idea, but it's a carpenter trick from way back.
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Old 08-03-2016, 04:49 AM   #10
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There are a slew of boatbuilding tools I've seen. But I kept the inside front cap as a rough template for all my arcs.
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