Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-10-2018, 12:45 AM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 4
Best bus

I have been looking at buses for the last couple of months with the intent of converting one. I have a buddy who has experience of driving buses on the highway ( tour, ect ) He has advised me to stay away from any rear engine type of bus because of overheating and other mechanical problems plus working on. I have looked at a flat nose Blue bird last week with a front engine and though it was really loud even after warmed up The owner said that there was extra sound proving installation in the engine cover. Maybe so but the wrong kind ( Fiberglass wall /ceiling insulation) and little of it I think. The Cummins engine had only 80, 000 miles on it and was pretty smooth running, it just seemed loud setting there next to the driver.
My question is front engine or rear engine , flat nose or dog nose ? Any input and advice is welcome.
I drive a Chevy long bed dually Diesel, a 2500 extend cab chevy and a 4 winds 31 ft Class C RV. But I want a schoolie.
Kentuk
kentuk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2018, 05:29 AM   #2
Bus Nut
 
Jdawgsfanasty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by kentuk View Post
I have been looking at buses for the last couple of months with the intent of converting one. I have a buddy who has experience of driving buses on the highway ( tour, ect ) He has advised me to stay away from any rear engine type of bus because of overheating and other mechanical problems plus working on. I have looked at a flat nose Blue bird last week with a front engine and though it was really loud even after warmed up The owner said that there was extra sound proving installation in the engine cover. Maybe so but the wrong kind ( Fiberglass wall /ceiling insulation) and little of it I think. The Cummins engine had only 80, 000 miles on it and was pretty smooth running, it just seemed loud setting there next to the driver.
My question is front engine or rear engine , flat nose or dog nose ? Any input and advice is welcome.
I drive a Chevy long bed dually Diesel, a 2500 extend cab chevy and a 4 winds 31 ft Class C RV. But I want a schoolie.
Kentuk
Personally I favor RE...I have no personal experience though...it's just "out back" when operating...thus no noise or heat in the driver's area...though a CE may be easier to service...I think it's mostly personal choice though

Sent from my VS500PP using Tapatalk
Jdawgsfanasty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2018, 07:56 AM   #3
Bus Nut
 
superdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: hills of sw virginia
Posts: 889
Year: 1996
Chassis: thomas
Engine: 8.3 cummins
Rated Cap: 11 window
any front engine will be loud, they are not made for comfort. i was looking at dog nose buses until i drove a rear engine model. most rear engine models are made to transport kids from school to school for activities or games. they have the big motors, transmission with lockup, highway gears, high ceiling, belly storage and air conditioning. as far as them overheating, any bus will overheat if a part breaks, the cooling system will keep a engine just as cool as a front engine model. as far as working on them if you have to remove the head or block yes its harder, most times they just unhook the engine and tranny and just roll the whole thing out the back. mechanical engines pre 1997 are much easier to work on no matter where they are.
__________________
living in a bus down by the river.
my build pics
https://www.skoolie.net/forums/membe...albums942.html
superdave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2018, 07:58 AM   #4
Almost There
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 97
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner ER
Engine: Cummins ISC 8.3 Allison MD3060
It's a personal choice, there is no wrong or right answer.

The dog nose buses look like they would be easier to work on, but harder to drive. plus in a conversion you lose that five foot or so in unable length.

The FE are louder, and hotter and generally harder to work on, and have a long drive shaft but they allow you to have the back door which serves as a toy hauler or a garage.

The RE are quiet, cool, easier to work on, give you the most inside usable space, have no drive shaft so you can add a basement but you lose your garage and back door.

Everyone will have an opinion... I picked a RE because of the heat and noise while traveling. I don't need a garage or toy hauler and I wanted a basement for battery banks, tanks and general storage.

Everyone has to weight their options and pick what works for them. There is no "Best Bus"

The same statement goes for length, shorty, mid size, long.. they have have their pros and cons... Think about what you want to do with your bus and then narrow it down.

James
JamieJackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2018, 08:30 AM   #5
Site Team
 
JDOnTheGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: The West
Posts: 1,004
Year: 1998
Coachwork: MCI
Chassis: 102 EL3
Engine: DD 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by kentuk View Post
...advised me to stay away from any rear engine type of bus because of overheating and other mechanical problems plus working on.
I think "any" is much too strong. I've owned two side-radiator, diesel pushers and loved them - certainly no cooling issues. That said; I have heard that rear-engine rigs with a rear radiator (as opposed to side radiator) can be less than ideal to work on (since the radiator is in the way).

To what mechanical problems is he referring? I've never heard of any rear-engine rigs having any "engine location specific" mechanical problems. I suppose one possibility is the radiator fan drive system - I've never had problems with that.

As James said, not having a full length driveshaft can be a huge advantage!

The quiet afforded by the rear engine is a wonderful thing! At least when making longer drives.
__________________
JD - Full timer out west
Missy - 1998 MCI 102-EL3 - 1.7kW Solar - 10kWh Lithium
My Adventures & Build
JDOnTheGo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2018, 11:57 PM   #6
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 4
Very good build pictures. Shows just how much work is involved if you want something nice . This sir is a very nice house NO GETTO.
kentuk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2018, 12:15 AM   #7
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Owasso, OK
Posts: 2,627
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner MVP ER
Engine: Cummins 6CTA8.3 Mechanical MD3060
Rated Cap: 46 Coach Seats, 40 foot
Just think logically about the rear engine scenario, regardless of what some mechanic might say.

The best-specced, most expensive buses out there on the school market are fitted with rear engines.

Our district just bought three, and they were over $160 000 each.

We do not throw money away.
__________________
Steve Bracken

Build Thread
Twigg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2018, 05:08 AM   #8
Bus Nut
 
bus-bro's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Whidbey Island, WA.
Posts: 825
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: All American
Engine: 3208 na boat anchor
Rated Cap: 2
If I bought another bus it would probably be a late model dog-nosed bus. About 30 foot long, but then again, I don't plan on full-timing in it.
bus-bro is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×