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Old 12-10-2015, 03:13 AM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Question Best tools for removal of ceiling and wall skins?

While I at first had no idea that taking those skins and walls off was even an option, I'm now convinced it's the way to go. SOOOOO......I'm super grateful to have a helper coming who will put in several days of hard work on the removal of the ceiling and wall skins (this helper happens to be my ex and father of my children, and as a single mom, having a helper is a big big deal!!!
Anyway, I want to make the absolute best of this opportunity and get him the best tools I can afford so he can get the most done. At this point this is what I have gathered from you all:

- Take off bolts in the ceiling with an impact screwdriver (possibly pneumatic) OR take an angle grinder and cut an "x" in each bolt then use a pneumatic hammer (air chisel) to get them out
- Using a pneumatic wrench OR just a simple mallet and chisel to remove the wall skins.....

My ex wants me to tell him exactly how to use these tools....he's strong and willing but not a super construction minded guy, so any specifics as to how to use each tool would also be awesome....

Thanks so much everybody!
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Old 12-10-2015, 03:46 AM   #2
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And I'm thinking of ordering this compressor:
21 Gallon 125 PSI Cast Iron Vertical Air Compressor 2 5 HP M Portable | eBay
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Old 12-10-2015, 04:07 AM   #3
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21 gal. 2.5 HP 125 PSI Cast Iron Vertical Air Compressor

There are plenty of reviews to read on that one at the source. You could probably go pick it up local, if you wanted, as well.
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Old 12-10-2015, 04:26 AM   #4
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Yeah I'm reading reviews right now.....sounds like it could be a throw away model, but if it meets the needs of the project.....
Maybe I'll find a higher quality used model on craigslist.....
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Old 12-10-2015, 07:31 AM   #5
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I use Ryobi cordless impact driver with a #2 square driver bit (and spares) for all my screw work. To tackle the tack welds on the wall panels, I'd recommend a compressor and air chisel. Takes me about 45 minutes per panel swinging a hammer into a cold chisel
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Old 12-10-2015, 12:43 PM   #6
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my best success removing the screws from the ceiling panels was a t-handle screw driver with a #2 square bit to break the screws loose and then follow along with a cordless impact driver to take the screws the rest of the way out. On the first half of the panels I used just the impact driver and ended up stripping lot of screw heads that had to be ground off. The second half I used a T-handle without stripping one BUT broke off half a dozen bits.
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Old 12-10-2015, 01:48 PM   #7
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Great great great info! If I do go pneumatic looks like I'll need a bigger compressor than the one I linked above. With regard to ergonomics (which are a HUGE factor for me as a small woman), do you think the pneumatic tools would make the work alot gentler and require less physical strength?
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Old 12-10-2015, 03:53 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwilcox View Post
Great great great info! If I do go pneumatic looks like I'll need a bigger compressor than the one I linked above. With regard to ergonomics (which are a HUGE factor for me as a small woman), do you think the pneumatic tools would make the work alot gentler and require less physical strength?
Hmmm. Do you have any opportunity to go over to some male-type friend's house and give an impact tool a try? My wife absolutely cannot stand impact tools or nail guns, and she's not what you would call pixie-ish. OTOH I've seen 95 lb women pick up and carry 50 lb sacks of concrete. It's as much about your outlook on life as anything else.

Air tools tend to be lighter than the equivalent capability electric tool, especially if you're also carrying batteries with it. But, you have to drag that hose around which I find usually more than offsets the weight. Air drills tend to have more controllable "teaser" triggers than electrics, but that just might be personal experience.

Also keep in mind that you're going to be pointing this straight up over your head and pushing hard for part of the time. It might be that weight trumps all in that situation.

My $.02 - Dan
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Old 12-10-2015, 04:20 PM   #9
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Air tools can be jarring in a way that hand tools aren't, so if you or he are the kind who is prone to joint pain, that might be a consideration. But in general, they're a power tool so your effort is spent controlling it, rather than providing all the energy to get the job done. That's usually a win.

There might be somebody you know from whom you could borrow a compressor for this one job. Eventually you'll probably want one of your own, but it's a thought.
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Old 12-10-2015, 08:04 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by family wagon
Air tools can be jarring in a way that hand tools aren't, so if you or he are the kind who is prone to joint pain, that might be a consideration. But in general, they're a power tool so your effort is spent controlling it, rather than providing all the energy to get the job done. That's usually a win.
This is a good point. I had never used air tools before, and did find them really jarring. There were times when something would catch the wrong way, or I would have the regular wrench (with my guy on the pneumatic under the bus) and it would spin out and bash me in the knuckles. I'd be left stunned for a bit, whereas he could practically cut his hand off and just keep going.

The weight of tools hasn't been an issue, but adjusting to pneumatic tools vs. regular power tools was a challenge. (If it matters, I'm 5'6" and 115.)
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