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Old 11-29-2018, 11:54 AM   #1
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Boiled Linseed Oil on pine ceiling

Finally wrapped up my ceiling last night, want to try to finish tonight. Anybody have any experience using Boiled Linseed Oil? I really want to keep a light color.

Also prob get down in the 40s here overnight. I know the rags are flammable after use, but is the wood. Would it be a bad idea to have my wood stove going to help cure?

Thanks,
dave
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Old 11-29-2018, 02:31 PM   #2
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Finally wrapped up my ceiling last night, want to try to finish tonight. Anybody have any experience using Boiled Linseed Oil? I really want to keep a light color.

Also prob get down in the 40s here overnight. I know the rags are flammable after use, but is the wood. Would it be a bad idea to have my wood stove going to help cure?

Thanks,
dave
I did my hardwoods in my house with linseed oil. Looks great..fair warning..linseed oil is self combusting. Which means do not leave rags brushes unattended after using..maybe put them in water..they will ignite..your ceiling wont ignite ..lol...post pics after its done!
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Old 11-29-2018, 03:41 PM   #3
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Boiled Linseed Oil is prone to mold and mildew in damp and dark environments. We used BLO on our beadboard walls.....it adds a really nice warm color. Then as we looked into it, we found out it's prone to mildew so we covered it with polyurethane just to be safe. I've used it for years on furniture that I've made, but that's all in a controlled environment. A bus, at least ours, tends to get damp when we use any propane. We haven't experienced mold and mildew, and I hope we never do....as I'm allergic to mold.


I'd steer clear of BLO and use Polyurethane if I were you. The water-based poly will keep things light, an oil based poly will add some warmth to the wood.
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Old 11-29-2018, 06:13 PM   #4
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It would and will require constant attention.
Even if you go through the effort to make sure the wood soaks up several coats of oil.
You will have to maintain it that saturation level of oil? Whether it be daily,weekly?
I made some hefty chunks of cedar and oak like a butchers block,an entire kitchen counter out of cedar that my wife didn't want coated with anything except natural oils.
It became such a pain in the but to maintain the natural oil (daily) after 3 on the kitchen counter she wants a sealer?(varnish,resin?) whatever? My issue to do that is? With the wood being soaked in oil? Going to accept/absorb a a varnish/resin type finish at this point?
The butcher block will only get oil.
But the kitchen cedar counter should have been sealed and finished from the start?
My conundrum is how much oil did the wood soak up before I expect the varnish to hold or just wait for it to dry out?
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Old 11-29-2018, 06:24 PM   #5
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It became such a pain in the but to maintain the natural oil (daily) after 3 on the kitchen counter she wants a sealer?(varnish,resin?) whatever? My issue to do that is? With the wood being soaked in oil? Going to accept/absorb a a varnish/resin type finish at this point?
The butcher block will only get oil.
But the kitchen cedar counter should have been sealed and finished from the start?
My conundrum is how much oil did the wood soak up before I expect the varnish to hold or just wait for it to dry out?

You could wax the counter with paste wax, that's what I've always done over BLO. It's a bit of work and periodic upkeep, but it buffs out shiny and smooth and looks great. Downside is that once you put it on, I don't think you'd be able to put another finish on top of it. Could also try an oil-based poly and see if that works. Test it on a piece of scrap or an inconspicuous spot. We were able to cover our BLO finished pine beadboard with an oil based poly no problem. I'd use butcher block oil or cutting board oil (it's just clear mineral oil, basically) on the butcher block. It should soak in over the BLO.
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Old 11-29-2018, 06:43 PM   #6
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I have used a mixture of 75% BLO and 25% Turpentine with great success on several gun stocks. IMO there is nothing else that protects a nicely grained piece of wood in a more beautiful way.

The Turpentine will make the BLO soak into the wood pores quicker. I apply the mixture to the surface and wipe off the excess after about 20 minutes. Apply another coat, rub it in with hands, wipe off excess and let the wood sit for a day or two. This allows the BLO to oxidize and gum up. (It is this oxidization and the resulting heat of reaction that sets carelessly disposed rags soaked with BLO on fire).

You never want BLO to oxidize on top of a wood surface as it makes a sticky mess. The BLO needs to cure in the wood to creates a waterproof finish without the artificial look of a top coating. A BLO finish is also more durable on field guns where a top coating is typically marred before the first day is over.

Yes, BLO is a material where mold will grow in moist conditions but so is wood itself. If the ambient moisture is so high for so long that mold grows on a gunstock, you have bigger problems already like severe corrosion on the metal parts.

Here are other options of protecting and beautifying wood surfaces.

Also a thin coat of clear Shellac looks great on pine IMO. I did the exposed rafters and T&G roof decking of my cottage that way. (Rigid foam insulation is on the outside between the pine decking and an OSB nail base for the shingles). We coated the wood before installation which was easier than fighting gravity afterwards. I'll probably do the same on my box van conversion.
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Old 11-29-2018, 09:22 PM   #7
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Pine & BLO

I've used BLO on hardwoods with great success, mixed 1/3 BLO, 1/3 Turpentine, 1/3 Spar Varnish. The Spar varnish will darken the wood a little but it also has UV blockers.

I'd let the BLO dry and put a couple thin coats of poly on with a rag or a brush.

When I get to MY ceiling installation it will be pine as well. I'll use some form of poly varnish on it, maybe I'll test some BLO on it first.??

Cheers
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Old 11-29-2018, 11:06 PM   #8
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Thanks everybody for the tips.

After some of the initial comments, i changed my mind and ended up going with an oil based polyurethane.

Solid 4 hrs of my wife and i putting on the first coat tonight. Just got finished.
Will see what all we missed in the morning.
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Old 11-30-2018, 08:42 AM   #9
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Nice!

That knotty pine looks teriffic. Good work.


My ceiling will be 75 year old southern yellow pine from aditorium bleachers. It won't have the character of your knotty pine. Instead I'll have random bolt holes, bubble gum, and a variety of stains from unknown origin.
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Old 11-30-2018, 12:41 PM   #10
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Thanks everybody for the tips.

After some of the initial comments, i changed my mind and ended up going with an oil based polyurethane.

Solid 4 hrs of my wife and i putting on the first coat tonight. Just got finished.
Will see what all we missed in the morning.
Let it completely cure for a few days and then knock down the raised wood fibers with fine sandpaper before putting down a final (thin!) coat.
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