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Old 03-17-2017, 08:25 PM   #1
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Ceiling

Hello,

I tried using the search but apparently it's not that good here. We tried putting in a ceiling today using luan but it kept cracking near the bend of the roof where it meets the windows. We were considering wetting the boards but are afraid of de-lamination. We tried re-framing the entire roof to accommodate the bend but that didn't work either. There are a lot of people that use tongue and groove flooring for the roofing and we are starting to understand why. We have also seen several people use luan successfully and are wondering how they did it. It was a semi expensive roofing material in which we have already wasted 3 sheets. Any tips would be great. The bend and the seems between the panels are the biggest, and only issues that we have run into so far.

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Old 03-18-2017, 08:07 AM   #2
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luan in 1/8"? of the 1/4" "project board" stuff they sell at lowes?
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Old 03-18-2017, 10:49 AM   #3
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Use luan up to the transition, then use something more flexible above the windows to meet it.
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Old 03-18-2017, 11:04 AM   #4
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Yes 1/8 in. Using two different materials sounds more difficult and half asses.


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Old 03-18-2017, 01:24 PM   #5
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I put 19/32nds plywood on my ceiling. No, it doesn't go around the corners to meet the windows. Cut in 4" strips it neatly conforms to the curve. I wanted a ceiling strong enough so I didn't need to tie into a bus rib to have stability for walls or whatever I might like to fasten to the ceiling later. Getting the plywood to bend to match the ceiling isn't difficult. Put the plywood up on jack studs then bend it tight to the ceiling using a jack and a 2x4 cut to the right length before screwing it to the ribs and purlins.

I thought of using 1/8th" or 1/4" paneling, but even two layers wouldn't give me the strength I wanted for attaching things to the ceiling.

If you have some scrap luan remaining from your broken panels you might try pouring boiling water on the portion you intend to bend. Plys usually take a while to delaminate, like a couple weeks of being wet. Heating the luan with water may change the wood color slightly but it may allow you to make the bend you want. Try to heat and bend a piece of scrap.

Good luck.
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Old 03-18-2017, 02:29 PM   #6
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Pro tip: search through google via "site:skoolie.net ceiling" or replace ceiling with whatever you want. Check out the image search section too, it helps me lots!

Are you doing anything to treat your sheets beforehand? I'm doing something similar for my shower install with 1/4" underlayment from home depot. I got mine in using a very ghetto setup. I left it overnight over a sawhorse with weights on both sides. I wet both sides a few times with cold water (warm is supposed to be better).

Then I pushed it up against the ceiling (there were some cracks, I'm still not 100% sure if I'm going to try and redo it.

but it looks good for now.


If I choose to do it again, I'm going to buy a cheap garmant steamer from Wally's and steam the crap out of it while gently applying pressure. I would imagine it would work better, but everything works better in my mind than reality.

Jazty did a great job on his Armageddon bus build. by scoring the wood. I tried doing this and failed.


Could also be good to take advantage of return policy and consider using FRP or polywall.

I used polywall, it was a little too flexible, but I like how it turned out in the end. #feelsgoodman.


Best of luck to ya mate.
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Old 03-18-2017, 09:41 PM   #7
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Thanks for the message. What's polywall? I'm a little confused by your message. The polywall goes under the luan? I was reading about steaming them but I didn't think it would penetrate enough. How long did it take to get that formed properly into your bus? Is it a public transit bus or a school bus?



Quote:
Originally Posted by TAOLIK View Post
Pro tip: search through google via "site:skoolie.net ceiling" or replace ceiling with whatever you want. Check out the image search section too, it helps me lots!

Are you doing anything to treat your sheets beforehand? I'm doing something similar for my shower install with 1/4" underlayment from home depot. I got mine in using a very ghetto setup. I left it overnight over a sawhorse with weights on both sides. I wet both sides a few times with cold water (warm is supposed to be better).

Then I pushed it up against the ceiling (there were some cracks, I'm still not 100% sure if I'm going to try and redo it.

but it looks good for now.


If I choose to do it again, I'm going to buy a cheap garmant steamer from Wally's and steam the crap out of it while gently applying pressure. I would imagine it would work better, but everything works better in my mind than reality.

Jazty did a great job on his Armageddon bus build. by scoring the wood. I tried doing this and failed.


Could also be good to take advantage of return policy and consider using FRP or polywall.

I used polywall, it was a little too flexible, but I like how it turned out in the end. #feelsgoodman.


Best of luck to ya mate.
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Old 03-18-2017, 10:11 PM   #8
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Polywall via home depot, 1/16" 4x8 plastic panel

She's a schoolbus alright. Hopefully the picture comes through smoothly.



I let the weight curve the board slightly overnight hoping it would rain (it did not). The next morning before work I wedged it in and pushed it in. It cracked a bit, I took it off examined the board, said "F it" and applied some pressure with the 2x4's. I gently hammered it with some scrap wood inbetween to get the form and position satisfactory. I still am not 100% sure if I will use that wood, but I'm probably going to do so because the cracks are pretty minor from what I can tell. I'd say alone it took about 30 min, with someone else it could be done in less. I did spend another 20 min unscrewing the wood it's resting on beforehand, cutting its shape so the underlayment would have something to push against while I tried to form it.

I am going to take it off and form it again (with glue this time) if it cracks badly I will redo it with steam and report back, if it forms nicely I might not report back here.
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Old 03-18-2017, 10:14 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TAOLIK View Post
Polywall via home depot, 1/16" 4x8 plastic panel



She's a schoolbus alright. Hopefully the picture comes through smoothly.







I let the weight curve the board slightly overnight hoping it would rain (it did not). The next morning before work I wedged it in and pushed it in. It cracked a bit, I took it off examined the board, said "F it" and applied some pressure with the 2x4's. I gently hammered it with some scrap wood inbetween to get the form and position satisfactory. I still am not 100% sure if I will use that wood, but I'm probably going to do so because the cracks are pretty minor from what I can tell. I'd say alone it took about 30 min, with someone else it could be done in less. I did spend another 20 min unscrewing the wood it's resting on beforehand, cutting its shape so the underlayment would have something to push against while I tried to form it.



I am going to take it off and form it again (with glue this time) if it cracks badly I will redo it with steam and report back, if it forms nicely I might not report back here.


Thanks. I'll look into the poly wall. If you could report back either way that would be great for others looking for similar answers.


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Old 03-19-2017, 08:54 AM   #10
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Check out "Bender Board". You can coil up a 4 x 8 sheet.
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