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Old 06-22-2006, 11:25 PM   #11
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I have a Chevy 366 with an AT545 trans and just took it on a trip out west I was running 65 mhh on a 97 degree day and the engine never got over normal temps even going up steep grades, my 366 looks like it has 2 thermostats just looking at the housing now would be a good time to test them.

On a side note the engine did not over heat but the shifter cable for the trans did, look at how yours is routed mine was 3" behind one of the header tubes the heat off the header must have been pretty hot on that 97 degree day because it melted the plastic housing off the cable, the cable still works but getting it into reverse is hard, I took about 15 ty-wraps and put around the cable to simulate the plastic housing that burned off.

Look at your cable if it is 3-4 " behind the header like mine make a heat shield, mine looked factory routed I assume they never intended someone to run the bus for 16 hrs straight 65-70 mpg and 5-10 miles at a time WOT never letting off the gas on the long up hill grades and going against a 15-20 mph head wind...

Good luck let us know what you find and details like cost and part numbers would be good for the archives.
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Old 06-30-2006, 03:57 PM   #12
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update, I took it to a radiator shop, they called me the next day and told me to stop down there. When I got there the guy showed me my radiator, it is full of holes (large holes) where the previous owner cut away the cooling fins and soldered the leaks shut. It looked terrible I can't believe it even held water. They guy who took it out said he only got around 2 gallons of water out of it. I'm having him get me a new one. $380. Damn.
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Old 06-30-2006, 04:13 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by glock17
update, I took it to a radiator shop, they called me the next day and told me to stop down there. When I got there the guy showed me my radiator, it is full of holes (large holes) where the previous owner cut away the cooling fins and soldered the leaks shut. It looked terrible I can't believe it even held water. They guy who took it out said he only got around 2 gallons of water out of it. I'm having him get me a new one. $380. Damn.

They cant recore your old radiator this is usually much cheaper than new, now days some "new" replacement radiators are made in china or taiwan and the quality shows .

Its the price that probably made the former owner skillbilly your radiator together in the first place...

When you get it home take off the radiator cap and put a few drops of liquid laundry soap in the coolant also put in about 3 table spoons of baking soda, the soap will remove the surface tension of the water the baking soda will kill any acid in the system or you can buy water wetter it does the same thing but co$t 100x more . Every time you change the oil remove the radiator cap and use a volt meter set to DC and check the voltage, red lead in the coolant black on the negitive post of the battery when it gets to 1 volt DC drain and change the coolant.
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Old 07-01-2006, 09:22 PM   #14
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Ok....the voltmeter is a new trick to me, but sounds really intriguing. What exactly are you looking for? Is this some goofy way of checking the pH or something? Is this a cheap way to check the coolant additive? Please do explain so I can go check my coolant's voltage
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Old 07-02-2006, 12:02 AM   #15
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Ok....the voltmeter is a new trick to me, but sounds really intriguing. What exactly are you looking for? Is this some goofy way of checking the pH or something? Is this a cheap way to check the coolant additive? Please do explain so I can go check my coolant's voltage

The acid in the radiator turns it into a battery when it gets to 1 volt its a good time to change it, by adding the baking soda it prolongs the process and extends the life of the coolant, the one volt thing goes back to the very early 80's when computers first started showing up on cars, when the voltage in the radiator got to around one volt they started having problems and the computer sometimes started doing goofy stuff, the fix is to drain and change the coolant, personally I dont like to throw stuff away when its 1/2 used up so I use the baking soda, I use the soap to break the surface tension, been doing this for 25 years it works great, no need to spend 100x more on some coolant system additive, keep the acid in check and you never need "stop leak" either, on average I get 5-7 years on a coolant change, if the coolant looks dirty or has a brown hue to it I will drain the system and change the coolant, if you put the coolant in a milk jug and let it set for 6 months all the crapola will settle ot the bottom then if you carefully pick up the jug and slowly pour it into another clean jug you can seperate the crap from the good coolant and use it again, I usually blend it with new 50/50 (distilled water only).
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Old 07-02-2006, 12:33 AM   #16
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Cool trick I'm not going to worry about it in my truck since the coolant is slef changing (the head gasket between the #3 and 4 cylinders is basically gone), but the bus seems to be pretty darn water tight so I'm going to check that tomorrow. Thanks for the tip.
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Old 07-02-2006, 10:56 AM   #17
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Cool trick I'm not going to worry about it in my truck since the coolant is slef changing (the head gasket between the #3 and 4 cylinders is basically gone), but the bus seems to be pretty darn water tight so I'm going to check that tomorrow. Thanks for the tip.

For the heck of it check all your voltages and let us know what you find.
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Old 07-30-2006, 04:03 PM   #18
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I commend the use of distilled water and coolant in the system; the distilled water will also have a VERY slight benefit in somewhat dissolving any mineral deposits left by other tap waters. Distilled water is cheap at around 50 cents a gallon.
ALWAYS use the recommended coolant, in the correct proportions, for your engine. A 15/85 mix of coolant and water probably won't do the job.

And be aware that letting old coolant settle, and reusing it, is probably not a good idea. If it was that bad to begin with, is it still worth the cost risk to your engine? Keep in mind that the water pump lube will also settle out, so you'll lose that benefit.

As for generating DC voltage in coolant, I've seen a phenomena in classic cars; the intake end of heater cores and brass tee connections corroding faster than the other parts of the metal. Apparently caused by coolant flow/friction/acid buildup, and the charge collecting on the first metal it 'sees', resulting in pinholes.
Was told to solve this problem by running a bare copper ground wire to the front end of any/all metal parts that coolant runs through, and grounding it to the frame. I like the baking soda/dish detergent advice, I consider that an excellent maintenance tip.

ALSO, be aware that some diesel engines require an additive to reduce internal turbulence and breakdown of cylinder liners due to engine internal vibrations...the ignition cycle causing the problems...can't remember where/when I read about this.
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Old 08-25-2006, 12:31 AM   #19
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Tips

Check out some of these tips
http://staceydavid.com/tips/tips.htm
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