Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-11-2015, 04:40 PM   #1
Almost There
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Corvallis, OR
Posts: 91
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Collins
Chassis: Ford E350
Engine: 7.3L diesel
Rated Cap: 18
Close off the gap at the bottom of a window frame to stop (some) leaks?

Like about anyone else with normal bus windows and old sealing, there are leaks at the bottom corners when it rains. Looking at the frame, it's kind of clear that the gap on each lower corner in the window frame is where it's most problematic, as pictured below...



Seems like a pretty easy fix here is to literally weld or otherwise seal off that gap. Then one mostly has to contend with water coming in the sides and top.

Has anyone else done this mod by chance? It seems like this might be a lot better solution than trying to load up the window frame with a ton of sealant. Still will need some, but perhaps not as much?

Thoughts?
Puggy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2015, 06:50 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
ol trunt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,962
Year: 1935
Coachwork: Superior
Chassis: Chevy
Engine: 317 ci/tid / Isuzu
Hi. I'd offer a couple of ideas but it would be helpful to see the rest of the window frame with the window both open and closed. Do you want to open and close the windows after stopping the leak--I presume you do. Jack

P.S. I'll be heading off to a bus rally Friday morning until next Tuesday so unless you happen to reply by tomorrow evening I won't be able to respond until my return
ol trunt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2015, 07:25 PM   #3
Almost There
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Corvallis, OR
Posts: 91
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Collins
Chassis: Ford E350
Engine: 7.3L diesel
Rated Cap: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ol trunt View Post
Hi. I'd offer a couple of ideas but it would be helpful to see the rest of the window frame with the window both open and closed. Do you want to open and close the windows after stopping the leak--I presume you do. Jack
The bottom half of the windows is fixed, and just sent in caulking. Upper half slides up and down. I can take a picture tonite perhaps with the window out.
Puggy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2015, 02:16 PM   #4
Almost There
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Corvallis, OR
Posts: 91
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Collins
Chassis: Ford E350
Engine: 7.3L diesel
Rated Cap: 18
This picture shows what the window opening is like, with the gap. Seems like a no-brainer to close that gap off for good rather than slather a ton of caulk in there.

Puggy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2015, 02:20 PM   #5
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Posts: 1,439
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 36
The trick is to not even let water get that far in behind the window. You want to clean the exterior joints and seal them with a thermoplastic caulking (NO SILICONE!!).
Completely seal the top and sides of the window and partially seal the bottom. Leave a small gap on the bottom-left and bottom-right so that if water does make its way back there it can still drain out.
For good measure, you can also clean (acetone works) those inner bottom corners where the water is currently leaking from and really goober that thermoplastic sealant into the corner before putting the window back in.
__________________
My build page: Armageddon - The Smell of Airborne Rust
jazty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2015, 02:29 PM   #6
Skoolie
 
johnbloem1974's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Montana/Texas
Posts: 233
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Crown by Carpenter
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DT 466e
Rated Cap: 16
Jatzy - This may be a silly question, but why no silicone?

I have some small leaks in my windows too, and I'm trying to figure out the best way to seal 'em up. Ours seem like they're coming from the top of the window....you can actually see daylight through the tops of some of them - almost looks like a piece is missing.

John
johnbloem1974 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2015, 02:40 PM   #7
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Posts: 1,439
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 36
Silicone is just not meant for the job. There are many products which are designed specifically for exterior window sealing. Supra Expert is my personal favourite due to it being reasonably priced, resilient to huge temperature swings and able to stretch and squish without cracking . It can even be applied in sub-freezing conditions without issue.

The biggest problem with silicone is the clean-up. If you ever decide to replace a window you will be left with the awful task of removing all silicone. It tends to crumble. Thermoplastic caulking will pull out in stretchy strings once you get a hold of an edge.
__________________
My build page: Armageddon - The Smell of Airborne Rust
jazty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2015, 03:00 PM   #8
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,939
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Good silicone don't crumble.

If I installed that window with silicone, and proper surface prep, you would never get the window out of the opening ever again.

As with any caulking, surface prep is everything.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2015, 03:15 PM   #9
Skoolie
 
johnbloem1974's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Montana/Texas
Posts: 233
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Crown by Carpenter
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DT 466e
Rated Cap: 16
Thank you, gentlemen! Appreciate the info...
johnbloem1974 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2015, 03:43 PM   #10
Almost There
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Corvallis, OR
Posts: 91
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Collins
Chassis: Ford E350
Engine: 7.3L diesel
Rated Cap: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazty View Post
The trick is to not even let water get that far in behind the window. You want to clean the exterior joints and seal them with a thermoplastic caulking (NO SILICONE!!).
Definitely was going to clean and caulk the joint too.

But to my original question, is there any reason to not permanently block off that gap? It seems like it's that way simply to make construction easier/cheaper.
Puggy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.