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Old 04-24-2017, 09:51 PM   #1
Bus Nut
 
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Counters cover windows?

Kitchen counters measure 3 feet tall when you factor in the base and countertop, but bus windows start well below that...

It seems like there would be a gap for things to roll in and fall behind the counters.

If you've decided to keep the original windows, I'd be interested in hearing how you deal with this situation.
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Old 04-24-2017, 09:57 PM   #2
Skoolie
 
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I raised the roof! Now I'm reinstalling the windows higher up. It's daunting, but I feel like I'm going to be a lot happier with the extra headroom and windows at eye level.
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Old 04-24-2017, 10:17 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by mysty View Post
I raised the roof! Now I'm reinstalling the windows higher up. It's daunting, but I feel like I'm going to be a lot happier with the extra headroom and windows at eye level.
I doubt we go that route, but it does sound nice! How much time do you think it took to do the raise?
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Old 04-24-2017, 10:53 PM   #4
Skoolie
 
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Hmm... about a day to take out all the windows and remove the spot welds that were holding the little panels covering the hat channel between the windows (there's a spot weld removing drill bit at Harbor Freight for $5 that saved the day on that one.) Not very long at all to cut the top off of the bus (my brother in law, Grant, has a really awesome circular saw that he uses at work to cut through submarine strength steel - it sliced through the bus like a knife through butter). We did the actual raising on Easter Sunday before church, and then Grant spent about 2 days welding all the new supports in. He said the welding would have gone faster if he had a better welder, but we were using a little flux core stick welder. We got everything done over two weekends - but we also assembled the threaded rod lifters, crafted a makeshift welding mask, two of us got welding lessons, we tinted a few windows, and we went fishing. You could probably do it in one weekend if you're a little more focused than we were.

Now I'm at the point where we're getting ready to skin underneath the windows. I'm not sure how long that will take. We're figuring it out as we go!
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Old 04-24-2017, 10:55 PM   #5
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The fish were totally worth it, though. Yum yum! ;)
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Old 04-25-2017, 12:28 AM   #6
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I have been looking at solutions to the same problem.i decided to just add any wood needed to make the back of the counter backsplash smooth so no dust can accumulate.there is gap between the counter and the bottom of the window so anything that falls will just fall through.just enough room between the counter and the window to dust/vacume it out.panted the back with kilz to inhibit any mold that might start back there too.
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Old 04-25-2017, 10:16 AM   #7
Bus Nut
 
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Originally Posted by mysty View Post
Hmm... about a day to take out all the windows and remove the spot welds that were holding the little panels covering the hat channel between the windows (there's a spot weld removing drill bit at Harbor Freight for $5 that saved the day on that one.) Not very long at all to cut the top off of the bus (my brother in law, Grant, has a really awesome circular saw that he uses at work to cut through submarine strength steel - it sliced through the bus like a knife through butter). We did the actual raising on Easter Sunday before church, and then Grant spent about 2 days welding all the new supports in. He said the welding would have gone faster if he had a better welder, but we were using a little flux core stick welder. We got everything done over two weekends - but we also assembled the threaded rod lifters, crafted a makeshift welding mask, two of us got welding lessons, we tinted a few windows, and we went fishing. You could probably do it in one weekend if you're a little more focused than we were.

Now I'm at the point where we're getting ready to skin underneath the windows. I'm not sure how long that will take. We're figuring it out as we go!
Nice, I think two weekends sounds extremely reasonable, and the breaks are well deserved. I casually floated the idea to my wife and she was very clear that this bus will not have a raise

We want it done for this summer, and I'd need to learn welding before doing this. That's on my to-do this for the summer as well.

Do you have pics up of the work?
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Old 04-25-2017, 10:19 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by SolomonEagle View Post
I have been looking at solutions to the same problem.i decided to just add any wood needed to make the back of the counter backsplash smooth so no dust can accumulate.there is gap between the counter and the bottom of the window so anything that falls will just fall through.just enough room between the counter and the window to dust/vacume it out.panted the back with kilz to inhibit any mold that might start back there too.
So you're saying that there is a gap between the cabinet and the wall as well, and you painted this area with a mold inhibitor? Or do you just mean the area between the cabinet and the window, not the wall?
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Old 04-25-2017, 10:46 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by PigPen View Post
and I'd need to learn welding before doing this.
Rib extensions don't have to be welded. I and others have used grade 8 bolts with nylock nuts and washers to bolt them together. Rock solid. I started out welding the first four extensions in, and decided it would be quicker and easier to just bolt the rest of them. Just make sure you use grade 8 bolts with nylock nuts or you can use regular nuts with thread locking compound... This way you don't have to worry about weld penetration or burning holes through your ribs... Easy peasey...
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Old 04-25-2017, 11:05 AM   #10
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I home built my cabinets.very basic.i left the bus wall as the back of the cabinet.that way I can get in and clean anything that falls back behind the counter.painted any wood in close contact with the bus wall with kilz so the moisture from the bus walls dosent start mold.i agree that you should hone all your skills and enjoy your skoolie as is before you do something like cut the roof off of it.
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