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Old 05-04-2015, 10:59 AM   #11
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Consider that if you install fasteners or other technology in the wheel well, it will be subject to corrosion moreso than if it was under other portions of the vehicle. If you end up traveling, ensure that it's very well protected from the elements.

It won't do much good if you've promoted corrosion and thinning of the metal in your structural areas.
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Old 05-04-2015, 01:45 PM   #12
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task,

Ya I thought nat was just talking about a 1/4" plate to protect from the tire exploding. I was still planning on doing those bars, but ya I guess a plate would be much better. I was just thinking that a straight plate under the wheel well might not direct the force properly unless it is curverd to the shape of the wheel well, which might be difficult with a 1/4in plate. Otherwise the corners of the plate would probably pierce the wheel well under tension causing it to rip through easier. The bars I can flex a lot easier to conform to the shape. Maybe the bars and then a 1/4in plate over that so the corners don't rip through the wheel well? Or would this not matter so much since the rest of the plate would have to come through it as well?
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Old 05-04-2015, 01:50 PM   #13
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Aaron, those grade 8 bolts are corrosion resistant, but the steel we are talking about is not, however It would take a few years I think to rust through a 1/4in plate I will paint it all with enamel as well
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Old 05-04-2015, 02:20 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HunteR0se View Post
Aaron, those grade 8 bolts are corrosion resistant, but the steel we are talking about is not, however It would take a few years I think to rust through a 1/4in plate I will paint it all with enamel as well
Prime and use either spray on bed liner or undercoating. That should help its life expectancy.
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Old 05-04-2015, 11:35 PM   #15
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Do what scooternj says and paint some undercoating on things and you'll be fine. It's not the 1/4" plate or the grade 8 bolts I'm worried about, it's the fender steel starting to rot out once road salt takes hold.


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Aaron, those grade 8 bolts are corrosion resistant, but the steel we are talking about is not, however It would take a few years I think to rust through a 1/4in plate I will paint it all with enamel as well
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Old 05-06-2015, 08:03 PM   #16
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I believe it is a huge mistake to bolt anything to the wheel well. We had an engineer look at our seating arrangement that we wanted. That is why we built a frame over the wheel well to hold the navigator's chair. We had an engineer look at the arrangement. The frame is welded together and then it is bolted to the side rail where the old students seats were attached. It is then bolted to the floor with large metal plates under each bolt under the bus to properly distribute the load. Not doing this correctly could result in a real tragedy.
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Old 05-07-2015, 02:46 PM   #17
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I believe it is a huge mistake to bolt anything to the wheel well. We had an engineer look at our seating arrangement that we wanted. That is why we built a frame over the wheel well to hold the navigator's chair. We had an engineer look at the arrangement. The frame is welded together and then it is bolted to the side rail where the old students seats were attached. It is then bolted to the floor with large metal plates under each bolt under the bus to properly distribute the load. Not doing this correctly could result in a real tragedy.
This is much more detail along the same thing I was thinking when I wrote

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What happens when a tire blows in that wheel well? Nice little bounce?

Nat
When I get to the seat mounting of my bus, there will be no wheel wells anymore. Also none of my seats will be mounted over any of the tires.

Nat
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Old 05-07-2015, 08:13 PM   #18
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Yeah, but nat_ster... this is a thread about a Crown owner. Just to clarify what I was saying above, I love the idea of building a specifically-designed frame for seat mounting. What I was saying was... if you are GOING to bolt to the wheel well (you already decided to go for it), a backing plate is DEFINITELY a good idea. And if you are GOING to use a backing plate, it's way better to have it underneath than on top.
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Old 05-08-2015, 01:27 AM   #19
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My Bluebird All American came with a factory mounted seat over the wheel well
for the front guard to sit in. The Seat was mounted on a bracket that attached to
the chair rail on the wall side with 4 bolts and 4 bolts into the floor on the other side
of the wheel well. Basically it straddled the wheel well which seemed to be lighter
metal that the floor. Not sure if applicable but info just the same.
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Old 05-08-2015, 05:52 AM   #20
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Quote:
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My Bluebird All American came with a factory mounted seat over the wheel well for the front guard to sit in. The Seat was mounted on a bracket that attached to the chair rail on the wall side with 4 bolts and 4 bolts into the floor on the other side of the wheel well. Basically it straddled the wheel well which seemed to be lighter metal that the floor. Not sure if applicable but info just the same.
The front seats on my 3000RE straddled the wheel wells. I think Greg's structural cage over the wells instead of bolting on to them is the safest, and tbh already on the horizon for mounting the "sofa" and nav's seat.
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