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Old 10-03-2015, 10:03 AM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
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Cubicle walls as building material

Cubicle walls seem to be readily available in my area. They seem fairly light, sturdy and have good sound deadening ability. It seems they could be useful as a bathroom enclosure for example. They would of course need to be covered inside with frp or the like.

What I can not seem to find is what is actually inside of them. I cant seem to locate any pics of them being built.

What is inside of them?
Do they have any junk wood?
Any insulation?
Steel bracing?

Any thoughts insights or ideas would be appreciated.
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Old 10-03-2015, 10:28 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 75GMCCadet26 View Post
What is inside of them?
Do they have any junk wood?
Any insulation?
Steel bracing?
From the ones we destroyed at work (don't ask stagehands to care about building your office)

Depends on the brand.
Like plywood and particle board, then yes.
no.
They can.

My thoughts: They could make for a really nice steel tent internal walls, but I wouldn't want to use them. That and you would always feel like you were in an office.
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Old 10-03-2015, 01:00 PM   #3
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Metal frames covered with fabric. The fabric absorbs the noise.

Nat
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Old 10-03-2015, 01:17 PM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
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So is there enough metal to use them as framing for walls? Then add foam insulation, and put desired skin over them?
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Old 10-04-2015, 12:13 AM   #5
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Hard to say. You will have to decide that for your self.

Nat
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Old 10-04-2015, 01:13 AM   #6
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I doubt it will save you much time retrofitting vs building from scratch although the way they hook together could save some time... still unless you get them for free I think you will be over paying.
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Old 10-04-2015, 03:05 AM   #7
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Another stagehand/Audio Engineer here...

If you find them for free, you might as well take them... But I wouldn't go looking for any--You'd be better off in just about every department building something like them from scratch. Honestly, even if I had a few in my backyard, I don't think I would use them or any part of them in a bus build. The only thing I think I might use would be the outer fabric, and that would only be if they were from a brand that used some sort of proper acoustic cloth on the outside.
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Old 10-04-2015, 12:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
Metal frames covered with fabric. The fabric absorbs the noise.

Nat
If you have the skills and the tools, one inch square tubing is cheap framing material and takes up less room then a 2X4. Every inch counts if you are building a short schoolie or van. MIG welders are relatively cheap and its pretty easy to learn to weld with one. Once you have the welder ... you can do many projects you couldn't do otherwise.

I bought all the steel I'm going to need (about 100 feet) for the bathroom, dinette, storage racks and (kitchen) counters for about $60.00

Instead of wallboard or plywood wall covering, I'm using plastic sheets. Home Depot has a couple different thicknesses.: woodhttp://www.homedepot.com/p/PLASTEX-1-16-in-x-4-ft-x-8-ft-Plastic-Panel-63003/202090190

If you need insulation, it shouldn't be too hard to find foam one inch thick.

For the "crafty", covering the plastic shouldn't be too hard.
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Old 10-04-2015, 10:33 PM   #9
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Quote:
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If you have the skills and the tools, one inch square tubing is cheap framing material and takes up less room then a 2X4. Every inch counts if you are building a short schoolie or van. MIG welders are relatively cheap and its pretty easy to learn to weld with one. Once you have the welder ... you can do many projects you couldn't do otherwise.

I bought all the steel I'm going to need (about 100 feet) for the bathroom, dinette, storage racks and (kitchen) counters for about $60.00

Instead of wallboard or plywood wall covering, I'm using plastic sheets. Home Depot has a couple different thicknesses.: woodhttp://www.homedepot.com/p/PLASTEX-1-16-in-x-4-ft-x-8-ft-Plastic-Panel-63003/202090190

If you need insulation, it shouldn't be too hard to find foam one inch thick.

For the "crafty", covering the plastic shouldn't be too hard.

I 100% agree with this way of thinking. This method is far better than using 2x4's and plywood for interior framing.

FRP also works great for finishing interior walls.

Nat
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Old 10-05-2015, 06:50 AM   #10
Mini-Skoolie
 
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I know how to weld. My dad has a mig welder that I can borrow. The only downside is that it is 240v and the custom extension cord for it is only about 35' long. Im not sure that my generator is big enough to run it or if it is compatible. I suppose we could drive it to his place to frame it out. I did not realize that square tube was so cheap I will look into that.

I suppose that I could use my oxy/acetylene to weld it up, I am a lot more skilled with a MIG or TIG welder but l know that I would get the hang of it quickly if I had no other option. Plus the welds would be hidden so they'd just have to be structurally sound. I have only welded sheet metal with gas, which is much more difficult because its so easy to put too much heat into the surrounding area. That wouldn't be an issue on tubing.

If we can frame it out for $60 or so I'd be happy.
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