Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-23-2019, 01:03 AM   #1
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 252
Drain plugs in the body panels

Do skoolies have drain plugs in the body panels? Not sure if I am using the right word...but I do know that my astro had plastic strainer things on the bottom or the walls that let water leak out of the body.
pengyou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2019, 01:19 AM   #2
Skoolie
 
tugboater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Palmer, AK
Posts: 246
Year: 2004
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf T Liner MVP 11 window 32í
Engine: CAT 3126E
Rated Cap: 72
I havenít seen anything like that on my bus, but I donít think the bottom of the space between the outer skin and the chair rail is water tight. Guessing excessive moisture would drain out there if it somehow got there.
__________________
One...slow...step...at a time.
tugboater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2019, 01:40 AM   #3
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 1,147
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
No, no drain plugs. There is no seal. The bottom of the inner wall terminates at the bottom of the floor pieces. The skin continues further downward. There is a piece of metal tacked at an angle between the bottom of the floor and the skin, tacked to the floor. The place where the metal strip comes in contact with the skin is open and is lower than the place it is tacked to the floor. This allows for water to drain and helps keep water from splashing into the gap between the wall and the skin. It is not sealed.
Native is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2019, 06:26 AM   #4
Bus Crazy
 
musigenesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 1,335
Year: 2003
Coachwork: International
Chassis: CE 300
Engine: DT466
Rated Cap: 65C-43A
Quote:
Originally Posted by Native View Post
No, no drain plugs. There is no seal. The bottom of the inner wall terminates at the bottom of the floor pieces. The skin continues further downward. There is a piece of metal tacked at an angle between the bottom of the floor and the skin, tacked to the floor. The place where the metal strip comes in contact with the skin is open and is lower than the place it is tacked to the floor. This allows for water to drain and helps keep water from splashing into the gap between the wall and the skin. It is not sealed.
I think it might have been you that pointed this out to me not long ago, but it's interesting that the back wall (at least in Internationals) does not seem to allow for drainage of any water that gets in. My bus solved that problem on her own by rusting holes in the floor, but I'm wondering the best way to deal with this. I need to find some kind of drain plug that I can install.
musigenesis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2019, 06:35 AM   #5
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 19,000
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
I think it might have been you that pointed this out to me not long ago, but it's interesting that the back wall (at least in Internationals) does not seem to allow for drainage of any water that gets in. My bus solved that problem on her own by rusting holes in the floor, but I'm wondering the best way to deal with this. I need to find some kind of drain plug that I can install.
I think we were discussing this a week or two ago.
The back wallfloor can rust due to not having anywhere for the water to go.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2019, 10:26 AM   #6
Bus Crazy
 
Sleddgracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: south east BC, close to the Canadian/US border
Posts: 2,258
Year: 1975
Coachwork: Chevy
Chassis: 8 window
Engine: 454 LS7
Rated Cap: 24,500
there is more than one car manufacture that has drilled holes in the floor boards of new cars to solve a wet carpet issue - car doors often have holes to allow water to drain - no reason drain holes couldn't be made in a skoolie
Sleddgracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2019, 01:00 PM   #7
Bus Geek
 
o1marc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Dawsonville, Ga.
Posts: 8,186
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/3060
Rated Cap: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
I think it might have been you that pointed this out to me not long ago, but it's interesting that the back wall (at least in Internationals) does not seem to allow for drainage of any water that gets in. My bus solved that problem on her own by rusting holes in the floor, but I'm wondering the best way to deal with this. I need to find some kind of drain plug that I can install.
Fix the leaks. You won't have 60 wet kids bringing water in every time it rains.
o1marc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2019, 04:20 AM   #8
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 1,147
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
I think it might have been you that pointed this out to me not long ago, but it's interesting that the back wall back wall and (at least in Internationals) does not seem to allow for drainage of any water that gets in. My bus solved that problem on her own by rusting holes in the floor, but I'm wondering the best way to deal with this. I need to find some kind of drain plug that I can install.

Our back walls and outer skins were rusted to the point of holes. When I removed the walls and panels I found a few rust holes in the bottom of the "wall" floor. Like yours, nature made its own drain holes. When I reconstructed the floor, wall, and skin in this area, I drilled a 1/2" hole near each end of the wall ... on both sides. I did this "just in case" of future leaks. I do hope we got all of the leaks because we are having a ton of rain today! [Note: I did go out in the rain and check ... all is fine.]
Native is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2019, 06:26 AM   #9
Bus Crazy
 
musigenesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 1,335
Year: 2003
Coachwork: International
Chassis: CE 300
Engine: DT466
Rated Cap: 65C-43A
Quote:
Originally Posted by Native View Post
Our back walls and outer skins were rusted to the point of holes. When I removed the walls and panels I found a few rust holes in the bottom of the "wall" floor. Like yours, nature made its own drain holes. When I reconstructed the floor, wall, and skin in this area, I drilled a 1/2" hole near each end of the wall ... on both sides. I did this "just in case" of future leaks. I do hope we got all of the leaks because we are having a ton of rain today! [Note: I did go out in the rain and check ... all is fine.]
I'm planning to make my interior back wall easily removable so in the future I can easily check on it and make sure it's still watertight. Right now every opening in the back is letting in water to some extent, so it's an obvious permanent concern.
musigenesis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2019, 08:53 AM   #10
Bus Nut
 
Ninjakitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Brevard County, FL
Posts: 867
Year: 1990
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: Ford
Engine: 6.6 New Holland Diesel
Rated Cap: 60 kids, 10 window
In my bus (1990 Bluebird), the bottom/floor between the outer skin and chair rail had a factory drilled hole for drainage
__________________
Nick
Ninjakitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2019, 12:34 AM   #11
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 1,147
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
I'm planning to make my interior back wall easily removable so in the future I can easily check on it and make sure it's still watertight. Right now every opening in the back is letting in water to some extent, so it's an obvious permanent concern.
In our rebuild, I attached the back wall lower half with self-tapping hex-head screws to allow for relatively easy access. This also allows me to get into the wiring for the lights as well as check for any corrosion. I did paint all of the back section (including all the hat channel) with PP&G two-part polyethylene enamel implement paint.
Native is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×