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Old 05-20-2016, 02:52 AM   #11
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Spax makes some excellent screws for driving into wood. They have a toothed grip on the threads, are coated appropriately, and of the right type of metal (not brittle)

You can get them at most of the big hardware stores. Drywall screws would not be eligible for consideration in my opinion.

These Are the Screws You Should Be Using
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Old 05-20-2016, 09:33 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Robin97396 View Post
...often snap off half way in. I don't think they are designed for framing type use like deck screws are.
^ This. Let me start by saying that I'm no real carpenter.
Some years back I found a big stash of black drywall screws and thought I had just saved myself ~$35 in fasteners for a small project involving 1x4s. I was dead wrong I hardly had the frame made before I snapped a couple screws by twisting the frame a bit. They seem to be quite brittle and - as was mentioned by another post - have a thinner gauge shank than construction screws. To make it worse, they all seem to have a Philips head. Around here you get Robertson on all construction screws (unless you special order) which is a much nicer system to work with.
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Old 05-20-2016, 10:18 AM   #13
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"Use the right tools for the job".

This applies especially to fasteners. Drywall screws were designed for drywall...not lumber.
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Old 05-20-2016, 05:08 PM   #14
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Yeah, the new chemicsl treament they put on the wood eats up pretty much any metsl if it doesn't have a good coating on it. And I've seen drywall screws rust just from the moisture in the drywall mud that they use to cover screws and joints.
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Old 05-21-2016, 06:45 AM   #15
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I have cut some 2x4s to frame my interior. I know I'll need self tappers for the metal but was wondering if the places I'm attaching wood to wood should have anything other than drywall screws? I'm using pl premium between all the wood to wood and wood to metal connections. I'm not familiar with this so maybe it's a silly question but was just wondering if people use something other than drywall screws for bus construction. I guess I'll throw this out there as well. Seems like most people talk about countersinking screws. Is that not just getting the flared screw head to go past the wood or is there some predrilling technique I'm unaware of?
i would certainly use deck screws. both sheer and tinsel strength is much greater. and they are galvanized.
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Old 05-21-2016, 11:23 AM   #16
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One more fastener note...

If you decide on using "treated" wood...you absolutely MUST use only screws & nails approved for the new chemicals.

The content is very different from the old stuff and will eat any metal not properly treated in very short order. There were tons of horror stories shortly after the switch was made ten or so years ago with structures literally collapsing. The geniuses who developed the stuff never warned anyone of the incompatibility and many contractors found out the hard way. Check the label on fasteners and you will see that they now indicate whether that have the proper coating or not.
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Old 05-21-2016, 02:13 PM   #17
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I don't even use sheer rock screws for sheet rock anymore because they rust when you apply the mud. Of course in a house then they're dry for the next 50 years, hopefully. It's not that much of an expense to upgrade to good fasteners. Buses have moisture. Yes, people will give you perfectly good sheet rock screws. I have a half a five gallon bucket of 3 1/2" drywall screws that are available to anyone that wants them. Get them an inch deep into a 2x4 and they usually snap off. Why would they make a 3 1/2" drywall screw anyway? Fire protection? I tried to frame with them to cut down on expense from using deck screws. Bad investment, and amazingly I've still got them.
I can see where you could use these to go through rigid insulation if you can screw to a wood surface, but less than an inch deep into the wood so it doesn't snap off. I'm thinking this bucket of screws need to go to a junk store. And these are about 30 years old. That's how useful they are. All the gold deck screws were used up. I'll use framing nails before attempting to use drywall screws for anything.
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Old 05-23-2016, 11:11 AM   #18
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Torx deck screws for everything, I keep mine sorted by how many times they've been used and have a few in the 10+ use bucket(temporary framing usually). I often stand on 2x4s on edge help up by only 2 screws, and you have to try pretty hard to strip a Torx head. You can also use a bit on size smaller in a pinch, but are more likely to strip.
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Old 05-23-2016, 01:28 PM   #19
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Deck screws, my favorite. Saves a lot of wood because you can back them out without damaging the plank. Seems much better than hammering, and if you've got little children around it doesn't seem to wake them up.

My X-wife didn't have an opinion about remodeling until there was something structurally there. I had to limit here revisions, after the fact, to changing things no more than three times. Deck screws rock, but the remodeling sucked.
Since then I've shortened the chain of command, the kids are grown and gone and I'm living in a bus. Apparently that confirms that I'm crazy with a lot of people, but anyone that sits down in here seems to really like it. So, obviously I've got short friends. Short, stout people are better able to work in the woods than taller people.
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