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Old 10-23-2019, 12:17 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Filling holes in the subfloor??

After doing lots of research it seems like the best way to fill the holes in the subfloor would be to use 100% silicone caulking OR a heavy duty epoxy on top of the holes and then pennies to cover them. I'd love to hear any and all input on which method would work best?!!
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Old 10-23-2019, 12:28 PM   #2
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That is exactly how I did my floor and it worked out well.
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Old 10-23-2019, 01:29 PM   #3
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One word came to mind reading the title, PENNIES.
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Old 10-24-2019, 02:27 PM   #4
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seconding pennies epoxied to the floor. I get it... it's like just gluing money to your bus...
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Old 10-24-2019, 05:19 PM   #5
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seconding pennies epoxied to the floor. I get it... it's like just gluing money to your bus...
Every penny ups the value of the bus at resale.
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Old 10-24-2019, 08:27 PM   #6
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It's the only option that makes cents ;)
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Old 10-26-2019, 02:44 AM   #7
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Location: North Pole, AK
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Year: 1998
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Chassis: International 3000
Engine: T444e
I bought a bus that somebody had started the conversion - they ripped out the seats, and redid the floor, and not much else.

1. They painted over the floor rust with rustoleum.
2. They put a drop of silicon in each floor hole
3. They put particle board down for the floor (no insulation)

When I ripped up the wood, I found it full of mold from where water had penetrated the floor. It looked like they had put the wood down before the silicon dried, but I'm not sure if that was the problem. The silicon stuck to the wood and didn't adhere very well to the painted metal floor at all. Clearly, large amounts of water came through the holes despite the silicon, were absorbed by the particle board, and proceeded to swell and mold the wood.

The rust under the rustoleum was bubbling up. It was a total mess, and the paint seemed to have increased the rate of rusting. The rust hadn't yet compromised the integrity of the metal, but there were a couple small places where half the thickness was gone. Most of the floor just had surface rust on it, but even that seemed to be the start of some big problems.

However, rustoleum doesn't come off with paint stripper, so I had to grind it off the whole floor. Chemical strippers didn't work. A heat gun and scraper didn't work. Wire strippers didn't work. Metal grinding pads just scored the metal and left most of the paint. Flap disks worked slowly and were out too quickly. I finally used a "paint and rust stripper disk" (looks like a black sponge almost, except hard and stiff) for my angle grinder. They're expensive in the store, but they come in 10-packs on Amazon. I also needed a respirator and I recommend goggles. 60 hours of paint/rust stripping is awful.

To redo the floor, here's what I did
1. Ospho twice
2. Rinse and dry
3. Polyurethane caulk the holes and wait for caulk to dry (about 500 holes)
4. Check all the caulk with a flashlight to make sure none had tiny holes (about 10% did) and add more caulk where appropriate. Let dry.
5. Check holes again - find 2-3 that need more caulk. Dry again.
6. Paint with metal primer (2 coats)
7. Paint with an oil-based paint (2 coats)
8. Install furring strips on floor with self-tapping screws and insulation between strips
9. Install quality plywood over the floor.

Good luck. I have my fingers crossed that my bus will last 20 years without further floor problems. If I had left it with the half-assery that was done earlier, I'd have had a disaster on my hands.
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Old 10-26-2019, 10:20 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biscuitsjam View Post
I bought a bus that somebody had started the conversion - they ripped out the seats, and redid the floor, and not much else.

1. They painted over the floor rust with rustoleum.
2. They put a drop of silicon in each floor hole
3. They put particle board down for the floor (no insulation)

When I ripped up the wood, I found it full of mold from where water had penetrated the floor. It looked like they had put the wood down before the silicon dried, but I'm not sure if that was the problem. The silicon stuck to the wood and didn't adhere very well to the painted metal floor at all. Clearly, large amounts of water came through the holes despite the silicon, were absorbed by the particle board, and proceeded to swell and mold the wood.

The rust under the rustoleum was bubbling up. It was a total mess, and the paint seemed to have increased the rate of rusting. The rust hadn't yet compromised the integrity of the metal, but there were a couple small places where half the thickness was gone. Most of the floor just had surface rust on it, but even that seemed to be the start of some big problems.

However, rustoleum doesn't come off with paint stripper, so I had to grind it off the whole floor. Chemical strippers didn't work. A heat gun and scraper didn't work. Wire strippers didn't work. Metal grinding pads just scored the metal and left most of the paint. Flap disks worked slowly and were out too quickly. I finally used a "paint and rust stripper disk" (looks like a black sponge almost, except hard and stiff) for my angle grinder. They're expensive in the store, but they come in 10-packs on Amazon. I also needed a respirator and I recommend goggles. 60 hours of paint/rust stripping is awful.

To redo the floor, here's what I did
1. Ospho twice
2. Rinse and dry
3. Polyurethane caulk the holes and wait for caulk to dry (about 500 holes)
4. Check all the caulk with a flashlight to make sure none had tiny holes (about 10% did) and add more caulk where appropriate. Let dry.
5. Check holes again - find 2-3 that need more caulk. Dry again.
6. Paint with metal primer (2 coats)
7. Paint with an oil-based paint (2 coats)
8. Install furring strips on floor with self-tapping screws and insulation between strips
9. Install quality plywood over the floor.

Good luck. I have my fingers crossed that my bus will last 20 years without further floor problems. If I had left it with the half-assery that was done earlier, I'd have had a disaster on my hands.
Mold sucks -- good to get it gone!

Patching holes --This is clearly the best use for pennies I can think of unless the thickness matters.

If the existing paint is that hard to remove I would leave it -- it's doing it's job.
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Old 10-27-2019, 03:06 AM   #9
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Year: 1998
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Chassis: International 3000
Engine: T444e
Quote:
Originally Posted by banman View Post
Mold sucks -- good to get it gone!

Patching holes --This is clearly the best use for pennies I can think of unless the thickness matters.

If the existing paint is that hard to remove I would leave it -- it's doing it's job.
The rust was bubbling up under the paint - the paint had broken down in some places, was sticking to the rust in others, and adhering well in others. Even so, you couldn't have drawn a 6-inch circle on the floor without having at least one problem inside of it.

Half-assing, no matter the technique used, is going to cause hidden problems. Tearing up the interior of your skoolie in two or five years because the floor is full of mold and soft spots is best avoided.
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Old 10-27-2019, 11:04 PM   #10
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We used Fiber Bondo, its green bondo with fiberglass hairs in it. Worked great! You can see the patches on our floors in this video if you look close!

https://youtu.be/RXEIJdG6e9c
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