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Old 05-11-2016, 09:41 PM   #11
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BurlKing,

Looks like you have done exactly what I need to do with my floor (bus came from MN) thanks for the example!!!
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Old 05-11-2016, 10:04 PM   #12
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wouldnt you want to do the floors before you cut the supports for the raise? this way you dont have a bus in flux where the body could flex or distort as youve cut the structruals for the raise and then take the floor out...

I would want to make my floors solid first and then do the raise.. your new floors active as more structural integrity against body flex.
-Christopher
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Old 05-12-2016, 06:50 AM   #13
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Yes, I never thought about the flexing during the lift.
Thank you guys.
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Old 05-12-2016, 10:33 AM   #14
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Once cut free, a bus roof wants to relax any tension that is built into them. It is highly recommended that substantial cross bracing be tack welded side to side before cutting. Some buses barely move and others can torque so far out of shape it is nearly impossible to ever get them to line up properly again. It can vary greatly from brand to brand. My old BB, which I raised 19", had some cross bracing and I still had to do a lot of work to get it lined up right. Should have used more.
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Old 05-12-2016, 10:38 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Once cut free, a bus roof wants to relax any tension that is built into them. It is highly recommended that substantial cross bracing be tack welded side to side before cutting. Some buses barely move and others can torque so far out of shape it is nearly impossible to ever get them to line up properly again. It can vary greatly from brand to brand. My old BB, which I raised 19", had some cross bracing and I still had to do a lot of work to get it lined up right. Should have used more.

wow!! that one I wouldve never known or thought of!. the metal staying "loaded" after 10+ years on a bus.

-Christopher
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Old 05-12-2016, 10:52 AM   #16
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Blue Birds have one-piece roof ribs that run from below the floor on one side to below the floor on the other. The sheet metal is then attached by wrapping it down around the ribs and getting riveted in place. The resulting tension makes the ribs and sheet metal want to splay outward when it is cut free.

There are other makes that use bolted together, multi-piece ribs and slightly different manufacturing techniques so they can react differently. I figure it is easier to assume it will move, tack it, and thereby avoid having to try and crank forty feet and a thousand pounds of free floating steel back into shape.
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Old 05-13-2016, 06:20 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Once cut free, a bus roof wants to relax any tension that is built into them. It is highly recommended that substantial cross bracing be tack welded side to side before cutting. Some buses barely move and others can torque so far out of shape it is nearly impossible to ever get them to line up properly again. It can vary greatly from brand to brand. My old BB, which I raised 19", had some cross bracing and I still had to do a lot of work to get it lined up right. Should have used more.
I used cargo straps cinched down in
Between each rib, didn't have any movement.
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Old 05-13-2016, 07:02 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu & Filo. T View Post
I used cargo straps cinched down in
Between each rib, didn't have any movement.
DO you have any pics of that? Thanks!
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Old 05-13-2016, 07:24 PM   #19
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DO you have any pics of that? Thanks!
On my home computer, at work now don't have them on my iPad
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Old 05-13-2016, 08:11 PM   #20
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Ribs

Since, everyone has mentioned it.
I am concerned about roof movement during the lift.
I watched a guy on youtube lift the roof and he used all thread bolts and car jacks.
Which is what I planned to do but, he had a blue bird and I have a carpenter international.

I ordered metal for the exterior skin to complete the lift.
I ordered 1x1 angle iron and believe it came in 20 foot lengths for something like $22.
1x1 tubing in 24 foot length was $19 so I have the material to tact all of the ribs together.
I could easily order more steel to create the rib extensions.

It would be easy in my mind, I can weld well enough to do most things and make them worth a few bucks.

While we are on the subject, I know Burlking has an international 3800 but, has anyone with a 3800 completed a lift?

If so, what should I expect for movement and flex in the roof?

My ribs have thinner sheet steel ribs connecting the primary ribs together horizontally.

What do you think would be the best course of action?
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