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Old 10-09-2019, 09:37 AM   #1
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Flooring question

So we just started our conversion last weekend. I have been given a pretty large amount of used decking like you would see on a backyard or pool deck. It is in good condition and I am considering trimming the rounded edges off, pressure washing it, staining it and sealing it and using it as flooring. Sounds like a good opportunity for basically a free floor less the labor. Any thoughts? Am I missing something?
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Old 10-09-2019, 09:40 AM   #2
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The main issue would be to make sure that it is NOT pressure treated lumber.
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Old 10-09-2019, 11:12 AM   #3
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What’s the species? If it’s redwood then it would make a nice floor. If it’s Douglas Fir then it could also make a nice floor, but it splinters easier.

How do you plan to attach it to the subfloor?

Can you get a floor sander? Once you have it in place you could sand the whole thing in place.
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Old 10-09-2019, 11:21 AM   #4
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Species makes a big difference. Cedar is quite popular here. I don't think that it would be ideal for flooring as it is quite soft.
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Old 10-09-2019, 11:24 AM   #5
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You should also consider weight when making the decision. Assuming that’s 1 1/2” material, it probably weighs twice or 3 times an engineered floor option or many times heavier than sheet flooring. That is, not taking into account subfloor choice.
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Old 10-09-2019, 11:24 AM   #6
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Duplicate post, so I’ll add the thought that a better use could be framing material.
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Old 10-09-2019, 11:28 AM   #7
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All good tips above and questions. Species makes a difference I found. Some woods have high moisture content, some don't. That means they will shrink when installed into a new environment. Some of mine have shrunk length wise even, which I did not expect at all. Width wise is where I thought the shrinkage would be.
Make sure it's all the same type wood and if you have enough good wood in it to even begin.
Strongly agree with no outdoor wood inside.


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Old 10-09-2019, 12:06 PM   #8
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You should also consider weight when making the decision. Assuming that’s 1 1/2” material, it probably weighs twice or 3 times an engineered floor option or many times heavier than sheet flooring. That is, not taking into account subfloor choice.
If it's deck boards , it is most likely 5/4" x 6"
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Old 10-09-2019, 12:08 PM   #9
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What would be the issue with pressure treated? I understand that there are chemicals in pressure treated, but the wood is quite aged, I don’t think there’s any residual fumes. Also, this will not be a “full-time home“ for us it will only be used for 2 to 4 day trips probably monthly.
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Old 10-09-2019, 12:37 PM   #10
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The "real bad" PT chemicals were stopped in 2003. But even the current stuff isn't food safe. Not that you're planning to eat off the floor, but I'd still shy away from it.
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Old 10-09-2019, 12:49 PM   #11
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If it’s pressure treated I wouldn’t use it inside at all
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Old 10-09-2019, 12:57 PM   #12
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Pressure treated lumber is not very pretty. We use it for deck structures but not for decking and rails.

Redwood, cedar and KD fir are most common in this part of the world. I have seen some folks go cheap and use hemlock. It doesn't weather very well.

A great example is the deck on the back of our house. Previous owner built it using hemlock. My wife went out on the deck and I heard a big crash. I went out and found half of my wife sticking out of a big hole in the deck.

Now I have yet another project competing for my time...
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Old 10-09-2019, 12:57 PM   #13
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What would be the issue with pressure treated? I understand that there are chemicals in pressure treated, but the wood is quite aged, I don’t think there’s any residual fumes. Also, this will not be a “full-time home“ for us it will only be used for 2 to 4 day trips probably monthly.
Supposedly modern PT lumber does not off-gas so it can be used in interior spaces, but it does promote galvanic corrosion of steel (because it's copper-based) which makes it a bad choice for the inside of a bus. It's also more expensive and generally comes very wet so it warps as it dries.
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Old 10-09-2019, 02:15 PM   #14
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PT is nasty.
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Old 10-09-2019, 03:02 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
Pressure treated lumber is not very pretty. We use it for deck structures but not for decking and rails.

Redwood, cedar and KD fir are most common in this part of the world. I have seen some folks go cheap and use hemlock. It doesn't weather very well.

A great example is the deck on the back of our house. Previous owner built it using hemlock. My wife went out on the deck and I heard a big crash. I went out and found half of my wife sticking out of a big hole in the deck.

Now I have yet another project competing for my time...
did you ever locate the other half of your wife???
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