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Old 09-15-2005, 08:24 PM   #1
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Flooring questions

Well, I am now going back and redoing the bus. I have decided I need far more insulation. So, here's my question.

I am going to place foil insulation under laminate or lino. So I need to lift up the stock rubber and possibly wood. Height is a concern since I am a bit over 6'2" so I would like to reduce how many layers I use. What if I were to remove all the material right down to the metal, fill holes, lay plastic, insulate and lay flooring? And not lay wood down?

I look forward to hearing from you all! Thanks in advance. -Richard
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Old 09-16-2005, 02:26 AM   #2
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Flooring

I noticed that you were way up north in Canada, so cold is definitly an issue, here in Texas it is heat, but either way insolation is necessary! I stripped the rubber and filled holes and laid down plywood because otherwise it was too cold in winter and too hot in summer. If space is such an issue though check out some of that thin insulation that they advertise in whitneys catalog that is supposed to be space age material and very thin. I understand the space thing though, because we don't even have a full 6ft anymore after insulating the roof and flooring, so for you that wouldn't be feasible. I would go for thin, but really insulating. But I don't think that the flooring straight onto the metal would be enough, I know that the wood has made a world of difference here, but we are living in it full time, while we are working on it to boot. I call it adventures building!
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Old 09-16-2005, 11:40 PM   #3
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I am thinking of using a urethane foam that can be poured in. They make different desities. I want to use a more dense foam and pour a 1" layer on the floor then cover it with plywood. It would make a good solid floor with excellant insulation.

http://www.shopmaninc.com/foam.html
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Old 09-18-2005, 09:45 AM   #4
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Flooring

Hmmm, the idea of pouring insulation in is certainly intersting. What about removing the ceiling pannels, pulling out the insulation, re-installing the pannels or use plywood then inject the liquid foam into the ceiling? I love the idea of it creeping into all the little cracks and crevices. Or mabye it would be a rotten pain in the ... well, it could go wrong.

For the flooring I am thinking about using this product -

http://www.homedepot.com
and search Refletix

(sorry I tried to place a link but was unable)

The thickness would not be as much of a concern as say 1" foam insulation.

So I am thinking of taking it right down to the metal, Laying 6 mil poly, then installing ribs 1/2" with insulation in between, then laying laminate "hardwood" flooring in. -Richard
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Old 09-18-2005, 10:05 PM   #5
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don't underestimate the expanding power of foam. It expands with tremendous force and could easily buckle cieling panels if it runs out of room.
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Old 09-19-2005, 12:41 AM   #6
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As far as using the foam for the floor I plan to shave it to 1". A lot of professional bus converters use the same stuff only in a $pray version to coat the walls, ceiling, and floor. They usually put 2x lumber on the walls to attach the plywood or luan. I like the foam because it seals every little crack. Wind intrusion is a big factor in keeping the interor cool/warm. The cost of the spray foam will prevent me from using it though. I will go to the extra trouble of the pour in foam. Here is a link to the spray stuff prices are at the bottom.

http://www.fomofoam.com/existing_homes.htm
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Old 09-21-2005, 11:47 AM   #7
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Beware pouring urethane. Somewhere on the web there is a website showing bad things that happen: walls rust out in months. Appears that the pouring process creates condensation that then is trapped against the metal. Removing panels and spraying, then sanding to appropriate depth seems to be the best way.

No personal experience, just what I've seen on the web. I used the 3/4" pink (or blue) styrofoam in my floor and on my walls. Left the ceiling with original fiberglass, but I'm in the southern US, not Canadaland.
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