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Old 06-06-2016, 04:56 PM   #1
Skoolie
 
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Talking Framing, wood type, AC, electrical and pipes...

Hi.

I started to strip down the bus taking the rivets out and I was wondering what kind of wood you guys use for the frame ?

I was thinking to screw 2x2s to the existing ribs and then cover that with other wood after the injected foam is done and make a subfloor with insolation ( injected too) using 2x2 so I was wondering in size and kind of wood to use.

In another note I was looking to buy a RV AC ducted, has anyone have done that without using the emergency exit ? ( link to thread ?)

And what about cabling electrical ? has anyone routed everything through the floor using some type of pipe ?

Thanks.
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Old 06-08-2016, 12:34 AM   #2
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Any ideas ?
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Old 06-08-2016, 06:34 AM   #3
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lets see some pics of your demolition, you can use about anything to frame with. there are lots of builds explaining electric. use strips of insulation board between the ribs and your interior to reduce thermal bridging. good luck
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Old 06-08-2016, 11:53 AM   #4
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I used 3/4 in plywood cut into 3in strips, I believe the ply wood is a little more flexible & won't splinter with body flex.
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Old 06-08-2016, 01:05 PM   #5
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Ok this is interesting :

Pictures of the demolition I will upload some but to give you and idea I'm still removing panels, need to replace rear windows panel because of rust so right now I have half of the bus without interior panels, it is a short bluebird 2002 chevy 6.5L diesel.

I was thinking to screw 2x2 against the ribs and use something like fir that is harder than pine but I see in the picture you went parallel to the ribs ? My idea was to add more thickness for more insulation because I will like to go to alaska in the winter with this bus at some point and I'm short guys so head room is still good if I add the 2x2 in the floor and ribs but may be there is a better method or is not much what I gain in insulation value by adding 2x2....I dunno.

I read a ton of threads about builds and I see people going different ways and I just wanted to to get an idea of pros and cons of each approach before starting to screw thing together.

For example :

Cabling : I was thinking to route the cables through the floor using piping but I could use the original side panels for it but I haven't found threads mentioning benefit of one over the other. Questions about this that come to mind are like, what about routing in ceiling and heat from outside ? if batteries are going to be in the floor or under the bus maybe is better co table through the floor ? what about installing the piping and then do the injected insulation ? is that recommended or you can just cut the injected insulation by hand after to install the pipes?

AC : I see a lot of people installing forced air AC but I want ducted because the bus didn't come with AC and I know is a huge pain in the but to install AC on Checy express/savanha because you need a whole new wiring harness so I was thinking to cool myself while driving in hot weather by ducting under my feet and from the top but I haven't seen something like that in any thread/project website but I have found documentation of RV builds that have such setups.

AC/Diesel Furnace: I know some rv AC have a heater controler/connection so they can force air from furnace through the ducted AC vents that could allow the hot air to go back down from the top and therefore use less heat etc and this goes back to the cabling ducting question that maybe routing from the top is easier.

sorry for the many questions.
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Old 06-08-2016, 02:33 PM   #6
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My plan is to say foam insulate out level with the strips that should be almost 2 1/2 in of insulation. I've been in Alaska in January & February before & don't plan on being there in them months ever again.

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Old 06-08-2016, 09:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepepito View Post
Ok this is interesting :

Pictures of the demolition I will upload some but to give you and idea I'm still removing panels, need to replace rear windows panel because of rust so right now I have half of the bus without interior panels, it is a short bluebird 2002 chevy 6.5L diesel.

I was thinking to screw 2x2 against the ribs and use something like fir that is harder than pine but I see in the picture you went parallel to the ribs ? My idea was to add more thickness for more insulation because I will like to go to alaska in the winter with this bus at some point and I'm short guys so head room is still good if I add the 2x2 in the floor and ribs but may be there is a better method or is not much what I gain in insulation value by adding 2x2....I dunno.

I read a ton of threads about builds and I see people going different ways and I just wanted to to get an idea of pros and cons of each approach before starting to screw thing together.

For example :

Cabling : I was thinking to route the cables through the floor using piping but I could use the original side panels for it but I haven't found threads mentioning benefit of one over the other. Questions about this that come to mind are like, what about routing in ceiling and heat from outside ? if batteries are going to be in the floor or under the bus maybe is better co table through the floor ? what about installing the piping and then do the injected insulation ? is that recommended or you can just cut the injected insulation by hand after to install the pipes?

AC : I see a lot of people installing forced air AC but I want ducted because the bus didn't come with AC and I know is a huge pain in the but to install AC on Checy express/savanha because you need a whole new wiring harness so I was thinking to cool myself while driving in hot weather by ducting under my feet and from the top but I haven't seen something like that in any thread/project website but I have found documentation of RV builds that have such setups.

AC/Diesel Furnace: I know some rv AC have a heater controler/connection so they can force air from furnace through the ducted AC vents that could allow the hot air to go back down from the top and therefore use less heat etc and this goes back to the cabling ducting question that maybe routing from the top is easier.

sorry for the many questions.

for driving A/C its not hard to install in a savannah / express to get dash air... that van should already have the dash vents... there are kits that include all to upgrade heater only to A/C... Ive done it before for those and econolines... a but of work but good solid dash A/C...

there are camper rooftop A/C units made that have ducting... you would need a large inverter / alternator or ru na generator when driving to get cool air that way... you could duct it overhead to the driver compartment.. then you have A/C for driving as well as being parked from the same unit....

I believe there are some procey high end units now that are fully central which work through your furnace ducts... im not familiar with those...

-Christopher
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Old 06-08-2016, 09:44 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
for driving A/C its not hard to install in a savannah / express to get dash air... that van should already have the dash vents... there are kits that include all to upgrade heater only to A/C... Ive done it before for those and econolines... a but of work but good solid dash A/C...
My Friend is doing this in his Savanah using the original ac and is a huge pain in the butt, but maybe aftermarket AC could be easier.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
there are camper rooftop A/C units made that have ducting... you would need a large inverter / alternator or ru na generator when driving to get cool air that way... you could duct it overhead to the driver compartment.. then you have A/C for driving as well as being parked from the same unit....
That is What I was thinking by adding a second alternator of about 280-300 AMPs to a 3000W inverter ( 15000 BTU units are around 3000W at peak)

Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
I believe there are some pricey highend units now that are fully central which work through your furnace ducts... im not familiar with those...
-Christopher
I think I have seen those and are about double of conventional units but they have the furnace control thingy that can drive hot air from the furnace through the ducts and vice versa.
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