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Old 09-21-2018, 06:16 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Ronnie View Post
No I have not really thought of making it potable. I see a few good suggestions have been mentioned. Might look in to them, although keeping the two separate has worked well for me.


Thanks again for the input.
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Old 09-21-2018, 06:19 PM   #32
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there are plenty of filters out there that would make pond water potable, most are pricey and require expensive cartridges after so many gallons pumped and regular cleaning of a pre-filter
Yup. Unfortunately, these are the kind I'm looking at having to get. But just because I have the ability doesn't mean that I'm going to go for the mucky water if I don't have to.
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Old 09-21-2018, 11:18 PM   #33
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For what you are wanting to do your best option is a small 110v submersible hooked to a garden hose. The 110v will let you run an extension cord to your sump pump. The sump pump would have to be run off an inverter but the 110v would let you have your pump a distance away from you bus without having to run huge wire.

Use the sumersible to push water through a sand screen and then a sediment filter into your holding tank. Once the tank is full treat the water with an appropriate amount of chlorine to kill whatever is living it.

Use your RV supply pump to push the water from your holding tank through a carbon filter to remove the chlorine, remaining sediment, and most nasty chemicals. Then pipe to water fixtures. I would further treat drinking water through a RO unit. The rejected water from the RO could be dumped back into your supply tank and reran through the RO and used for washing.

Ted
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Old 09-22-2018, 05:05 AM   #34
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the 110volt ac submersable pump will work very well. Just be careful about keeping the electrical connections dry. 110 and water make for a shocking day.

I do not have an inverter on my boat so 12 volt it is for me, or steam power...
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Old 09-22-2018, 11:52 AM   #35
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I set a system up for an off grid application where we pumped water from a creek.

I used a submersible well pump in the creek. It fed 150' of garden hose to storage tank 1.

Tank 1 had a recirculating pool filter that used a food grade filter media made from crushed glass.

I would fill the tank from the creek, dose it with an oxidiser, run the filter overnight and then transfer the water to a second tank for normal use.

The water from the second tank passed through 10 micron, 5 micron and 0.5 micron carbon filters. Finally a UV filter and into the house.

The pool filter was intended for a small above ground pool. It is sold as a "sand filter".

The well pump is in my garage. You are welcome to it.
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Old 09-23-2018, 08:46 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by TJones View Post
For what you are wanting to do your best option is a small 110v submersible hooked to a garden hose. The 110v will let you run an extension cord to your sump pump. The sump pump would have to be run off an inverter but the 110v would let you have your pump a distance away from you bus without having to run huge wire.

Use the sumersible to push water through a sand screen and then a sediment filter into your holding tank. Once the tank is full treat the water with an appropriate amount of chlorine to kill whatever is living it.

Use your RV supply pump to push the water from your holding tank through a carbon filter to remove the chlorine, remaining sediment, and most nasty chemicals. Then pipe to water fixtures. I would further treat drinking water through a RO unit. The rejected water from the RO could be dumped back into your supply tank and reran through the RO and used for washing.

Ted
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie View Post
the 110volt ac submersable pump will work very well. Just be careful about keeping the electrical connections dry. 110 and water make for a shocking day.

I do not have an inverter on my boat so 12 volt it is for me, or steam power...
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
I set a system up for an off grid application where we pumped water from a creek.

I used a submersible well pump in the creek. It fed 150' of garden hose to storage tank 1.

Tank 1 had a recirculating pool filter that used a food grade filter media made from crushed glass.

I would fill the tank from the creek, dose it with an oxidiser, run the filter overnight and then transfer the water to a second tank for normal use.

The water from the second tank passed through 10 micron, 5 micron and 0.5 micron carbon filters. Finally a UV filter and into the house.

The pool filter was intended for a small above ground pool. It is sold as a "sand filter".

The well pump is in my garage. You are welcome to it.
Thanks for the input folks.

I'm getting excited about the suction hose idea (like THIS ONE) although I did find a cheaper supplier somewhere. It can allow me to use the pump onboard, keeping things a little simpler. Right now, I'm leaning toward a DC pump that doesn't need to be primed.

For filtration, I'm thinking of a bank of filters inline. My concern right now is a question in my mind of how much flow the filters can handle (TBD). I'd like to see if I can use a washable sediment filter, a carbon filter (maybe 5 microns or so) for taste and odor, a 1 or .5 micron filter for biohazards, a UV and an RO.

I don't like the idea of having water in a holding tank that hasn't been thoroughly cleansed (except for the RO discharge, as suggested). Any secondary or tertiary tanks would be for added capacity of potable water.

All of your comments and suggestions are greatly appreciated.

G Dub
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Old 09-25-2018, 12:00 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by G Dub View Post
Thanks for the input folks.

I don't like the idea of having water in a holding tank that hasn't been thoroughly cleansed (except for the RO discharge, as suggested). Any secondary or tertiary tanks would be for added capacity of potable water.

G Dub



If you have the room available, temporarily (maybe in the aisle, under bus storage, roof storage, or hitch mounted platform), you could use an expandable storage water device. They blow up like a waterbed/balloon when you add water and deflate when you empty them. Take up very little storage space when empty and are light weight.


You could fill one up quickly, take off, and then filter it at your convenience. Could also be used for temporary additional potable water storage for extended boondocking (put 1 in the aisle, fill it, then when you get where you are going, empty it into another one on the ground to reclaim your aisle space). You could have multiple ones for different uses. I can think of many different uses.
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Old 09-25-2018, 12:53 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by kidharris View Post
If you have the room available, temporarily (maybe in the aisle, under bus storage, roof storage, or hitch mounted platform), you could use an expandable storage water device. They blow up like a waterbed/balloon when you add water and deflate when you empty them. Take up very little storage space when empty and are light weight.


You could fill one up quickly, take off, and then filter it at your convenience. Could also be used for temporary additional potable water storage for extended boondocking (put 1 in the aisle, fill it, then when you get where you are going, empty it into another one on the ground to reclaim your aisle space). You could have multiple ones for different uses. I can think of many different uses.
A bladder. I'll look into it. Thanks.
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