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Old 07-14-2019, 10:41 PM   #1
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Grease remover / soap after ospho?

I just used ospho on my metal floor to convert rust. Prior to that, I wire-wheeled, vacuumed, and cleaned the floor with water and rags... But theres still plenty of adhesive residue on the floor, and possibly other schmutz. I am planning to use rustoleum primer.

Seems others recommend using grease and wax remover or soap before ospho... I never did that. Should I do it now even though I have already used ospho? Or will the primer be fine without it?

Also, there wasnt much rust - does the dry ospho need to be neutralized in any way, or just rustoleum right over it?
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Old 07-17-2019, 07:01 PM   #2
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Can't comment on the ospho,but the "rusty metal" rustolem stuck to my my marginally prepared floor as well as I could have hoped for.
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Old 07-17-2019, 08:16 PM   #3
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Angry

Read the directions on the container. Normally before painting the ospho is rinsed off first.

PS, I didn't post the angry emoji, and I couldn't edit it out.
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Old 07-17-2019, 10:37 PM   #4
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After my ospho had dried for 2 days because the humidity here rarely falls below 60 percent lately, I parked my bus on a slope and spent several hours in there with a garden hose, and a worn out old corn broom that spent about 40 years in my dad's wood working shop. I did no more grinding after the ospho. I didn't think it was necessary because I did so much before the ospho, so after the floor dried from all the rinsing, I just swept and started painting with Rustoleum rusty metal primer followed by rustoleum enamel.

That was a couple of weeks ago. As far as I can tell by poking at it, the paint seems to have stuck well. I'm patching holes now, and finding a few small chunks of seam sealer thrown off by the wire brush in my angle grinder that stuck to the floor instead of sweeping up. I'm just scraping them off with my thumbnail and putting some epoxy and a patch on those spots too.

I've always been fussy about doing the best job I can. It's not something new that started when I got interested in building a bus. Like my grandfather told me many years ago: "If something is worth doing then do your best. If it's not worth doing, then don't do it, find something else to do." I thought that was pretty good advice, so I've been following it for about 60 years now.
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Old 07-17-2019, 10:57 PM   #5
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When time to rinse I used a pressure washer, nothing in there at that point that can be damaged. Plus the pressure gets stuff out you might not normally get to. Blasted floor, walls and ceiling.
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Old 07-18-2019, 12:06 AM   #6
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@01marc, If I had a pressure washer, I would have certainly used it for that job. But I think plenty of water from the hose and lots of elbow grease applied to that short, old corn broom did an adequate job.

And you're also right on about there being nothing in there to be damaged by plenty of water, as long as the main switch on the line from the negative terminals of the batteries is off. And then I didn't turn the power back on for 2 days just to be sure it was dry.
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Old 07-18-2019, 12:41 AM   #7
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@01marc, If I had a pressure washer, I would have certainly used it for that job. But I think plenty of water from the hose and lots of elbow grease applied to that short, old corn broom did an adequate job.

And you're also right on about there being nothing in there to be damaged by plenty of water, as long as the main switch on the line from the negative terminals of the batteries is off. And then I didn't turn the power back on for 2 days just to be sure it was dry.
In this heat mine was dry in half an hour. I had a friend stop by and loan me his pressure washer, got all the stuck insulation off the ceiling also, and kept the fiberglas dust down.
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Old 07-18-2019, 12:51 AM   #8
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I would not turn down an offer like that, but I am just not in the habit of asking people to borrow things. I'd rather do it the hard way.

So what's the humidity like in Atlanta this time of year? I've never been to Georgia even though one thread of my family comes from there. One of my great-grandfathers was born in Atlanta, simultaneous with General Sherman's visit, so much to the consternation of the geneologists in the family, he was never issued a birth certificate. So it's almost like he didn't exist even though he had 12 children, including my maternal grandmother. Bureaucrats are wonderful.
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Old 07-18-2019, 01:04 AM   #9
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I would not turn down an offer like that, but I am just not in the habit of asking people to borrow things. I'd rather do it the hard way.

So what's the humidity like in Atlanta this time of year? I've never been to Georgia even though one thread of my family comes from there. One of my great-grandfathers was born in Atlanta, simultaneous with General Sherman's visit, so much to the consternation of the geneologists in the family, he was never issued a birth certificate. So it's almost like he didn't exist even though he had 12 children, including my maternal grandmother. Bureaucrats are wonderful.
My brother the other day gave me an analogy that fit. You've heard of a 3 Dog Night. Well the last month has been all 4 T-shirts a day humid. I grew up in Ct., humidity isn't any different.
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Old 07-18-2019, 01:47 AM   #10
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It would be like that here too, if it were warmer. Lately it's rarely been above 70 for a daily maximum.

But then we are about 8 or 9 miles from the Pacific,which is at its coldest about now, and so the lows lately are somewhere in the high 50s or low 60s, but there's more clouds than usual this year and the humidity is higher and goes up to near 100 per cent when the sun is not shining. If cool summers are anyone's thing, they should move to the Oregon coast. There is an upside though, in the winter temperatures.

Last winter we had light frosts for no more than 8 to 10 days all winter, but we had plenty of days with lows in the low 40s and highs in the high 40s or low 50s.

The weather is actually kind of boring here. We have not had an exciting weather day since October 12, 1962. We call it the Columbus Day Storm. There is a picture of some renown showing about a 30 foot long salmon trawler being blown sideways, on the crest of a wave, in about 4 or 5 feet of water, down the main street of Coos Bay OR. That boat took up the whole street, which is also Highway 101 southbound.

But that took winds of well over 100 miles an hour to tear that boat from it's moorings and blow it down a nearby street. Windspeeds like that are rare. Usually, winter wind speeds around here never get much over 50 mph when we're getting a storm from Southeast Asia. But that's near the ocean, inland, up a river, 40 mph is pretty much the maximum wind speed during the winter.

So if you're tired of the heat in Atlanta, you could move to Coos County OR, where it is humid all the time but hasn't gotten hot for years. However, we are much less protected than the Seattle area and quite often over the course of the winter we will get over 6 or more inches of rain in 24 hours.
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