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Old 04-09-2015, 12:55 PM   #11
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Spot on guys.

There was a thread back about 5 years ago on pirate 4x4 that showed a few pics if a real bad mess in a one ton camperized van build. That prompted me to do a bit of research.

I'm real glad that fellow member took the time to share that mistake. Years latter I have the opportunity to help save others from making the same mistake.

Filling support ribs, ("Hat Chanels") that have been painted inside, using common sense not to over fill the gap on a hot day is a bit different. Fill only a few inches at a time, moving from rib to rib in a big circle around the inside of my bus. There are over 30 ribs, so by the time I got back to the first rib I filled, and a quick drink of water, I was ready to start spraying foam again.

I did this on my bus and I feel 100% confident it will not cause any further corrosion.

I also pulled the old yellow fiberglass insulation out of the support ribs with a wire from the bottom before foaming. This is one more reason I removed the bottom outer skin panels off my bus.

Nat
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Old 04-09-2015, 04:56 PM   #12
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Wow, all this information is so great! You are right about the cost, I did the math and there are 30+ panels, with one can per panel @ $5+ bucks a piece... Yikes!!
Also, the fire safety is Huge for us (as it should be with everyone)
The way it would corrode metal is also a no brainier... Apparently they don't advertise this aspect well, though!
Thanks a bunch, everyone!! Time to cross that not-so-great-stuff of our list.

I called around to local insulation places as well. They mostly said that their products won't work by drilling a hole and spraying it in. Their products would just NOT fully cover the space, and get stuck near the point of entry. Figured, just thought I would try and ask if they had a miracle product. My good friend also mentioned that they use air to spray it in, which might make it travel farther. Nope!

However, one guy I spoke to mentioned "sand stuff that they pour in and around masonry bricks to insulate when building a house." He suggested looking into it, and I believe he was talking about perlite. Because it's lightweight, and "sandy", he thought it would work best to pour it in from the top. Anyone ever heard of this?
Sounds like another great option, but I wonder if the loose granular consistency will just jiggle out of any lost cracks, etc. and we will have a constant supply of perlite snow coming down.
Interesting concept, and the R value is comparable to spray in foam... But a big plus is that it is very fire resistant. It's also pretty hydrophobic, I think. (I'm just guessing that due to my observations working with it with plants, though.) Perhaps a medium grain perilite will work? It's not unreasonably expensive either.

Ah, we love that ceiling so much! It's shiny and pretty! Terrible for thermal bridges with all the rivets and beams, yes I know. But it's magnetic! :P

Oh hey, we started a website blog too, after requests from family and friends. thewolfbus.com. Some pics on there, and more to come. Although I suppose all of our bus ceilings are pretty similar, lol!!
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Old 04-09-2015, 09:16 PM   #13
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Most folks from here won't follow your build on http://thewolfbus.com/, myself included.

Host your build here like the rest of us for maximum viewing.

Nat
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Old 04-09-2015, 10:18 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
Most folks from here won't follow your build on thewolfbus, myself included.

Host your build here like the rest of us for maximum viewing.

Nat
Ah, sorry. Didn't know that was the custom here. Just thought the pictures are already up there, and if others enjoy looking at others projects as much as I do, thought it might be fun.

Didn't mean to offend! I was just putting it there so I'm not just another random newbie poster.
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Old 04-09-2015, 11:06 PM   #15
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However, one guy I spoke to mentioned "sand stuff that they pour in and around masonry bricks to insulate when building a house." He suggested looking into it, and I believe he was talking about perlite. Because it's lightweight, and "sandy", he thought it would work best to pour it in from the top. Anyone ever heard of this?
I've posted about this stuff in the wood heating thread, not as something to actually use in a Skoolie but just as general information, one of the options for insulating chimneys when installing stainless liners. It's a "pour down" product, and it's usually vermiculite, not perlite (perlite has high water content and can absorb even more), mixed with a small amount of portland cement. You don't mix it like concrete - you just slightly dampen it enough to activate the portland cement, and it pours down like very light, very coarse sand.

In chimneys it's the bees' knees - as long as the surrounding flue isn't so huge that it takes a dozen bags (it's a bit of work to mix and get onto the roof), it makes great insulation, provides rigid support to the liner, and if NECESSARY, is removable - you bang it around with a chain or pole and it breaks back up enough to vacuum out. It's a H*** of a lot of work to remove, but it can be done.

In a skoolie I don't know what you'd use this stuff for. It's easily fractured when vibrated/shocked and although I suppose you could stuff it between two sheets of stainless or something for heat shielding, stainless or cement board mounted on stand-offs works just great.

This stuff is very lightweight - but only compared to concrete. As a pour-in insulator for a wall it provides a poor R value. Its main purpose is to be heat/fire-proof insulation for flues, where the main goal is to a) not be flammable, while at the same time b) keeping the flue warmER to minimize creosote condensation and improve its draft. This is mainly done in exterior masonry chimneys where outside-air cooling is a problem.

It can achieve both of these things with a very low R value. I wouldn't bother with it in a wall. The existing bus wall is so thin that you'd be lucky to get R-1 or R-2.

If anybody wants a video of this I can post one - I have a half bag left from a previous project. But as I said I think it would be a waste. I wouldn't recommend it in a skoolie. You're still going to get all the thermal bridging around the metal support channels, and it's not going to add enough to the walls to be worth the money.
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Old 04-09-2015, 11:39 PM   #16
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If anybody wants a video of this I can post one - I have a half bag left from a previous project. But as I said I think it would be a waste. I wouldn't recommend it in a skoolie. You're still going to get all the thermal bridging around the metal support channels, and it's not going to add enough to the walls to be worth the money.
Thank you! I really appreciate all of your knowledge!

On to looking for an air hammer, I suppose. Just have to convince the boyfriend that the ceiling needs to come down.
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Old 04-10-2015, 11:29 AM   #17
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Justin keeps saying "there's got to be another way".

We want a deck up top... Maybe that is our solution!
On to researching that.

All of your replies are absolutely amazing, I can't thank you all enough for your insight. I'm so happy for this website and its forums!! It's a life saver!!
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Old 04-10-2015, 12:07 PM   #18
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Justin keeps saying "there's got to be another way".

There is.

It's called sweating your self half to death, and freezing almost to death in a bus with a uninsulated pretty metal ceiling.

We tell it only like it is.

Roof deck or not, that metal ceiling needs to come down.

Nat
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Old 04-10-2015, 04:05 PM   #19
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I have to confess I may have misled you a little bit about the easiness of pulling down the ceiling. Last night I removed my own ceiling and was disappointed to find that although the walls seemed to be fastened with aluminum rivets, those in the ceiling were definitely steel and didn't shear off with the air chisel as fast as the aluminum kind do. It still worked, but it tore the metal more and it took longer (5-10 seconds each).
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Old 04-10-2015, 04:43 PM   #20
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I have to confess I may have misled you a little bit about the easiness of pulling down the ceiling. Last night I removed my own ceiling and was disappointed to find that although the walls seemed to be fastened with aluminum rivets, those in the ceiling were definitely steel and didn't shear off with the air chisel as fast as the aluminum kind do. It still worked, but it tore the metal more and it took longer (5-10 seconds each).

We really appreciate your insight.
Did you still use the same method... The one posted earlier with the air hammer and modified chisel?
How many chisels did you go through with the ceiling?
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